Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I put the bike up on my the rear stand to examine a tire puncture and before setting her back down I started her up to hear her purr (too cold to ride). To my surprise the rear wheel was spinning while the transmission was in neutral? It wasn't turning fast or hard, actually could stop it with my hand, buy why was it turning at all? A trip to the dealer is in the works for the tire puncture and now this issue. Can anyone offer up some knowledge about why this is happening?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
It's normal. You're just bringing the tire/wheel in right? If you have a rear stand, there is no bike that's easier to pull the rear wheel on...
Actually I decided it would be easier/cheaper to take it in. The shop quoted me $45 to fix the rear or $25 if I bring the tire in. Since I don't have a torque wrench or the 1 13/16" socket it's cheaper to take in. Plus my front tire is wearing funny so I'll have them swap that out as well.

Thanks for the reply!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
919 Posts
+1 just drag from the wet clutch causing the wheel to freewheel..

Russ
Close but not quite. The clutch is 100% engaged so it's not "dragging". When the gearbox is in neutral, all the gears are meshed & turning but none on them is locked to the shaft. So it is the friction between 6 spinning gears and the shaft that is turning the wheel.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,566 Posts
Close but not quite. The clutch is 100% engaged so it's not "dragging". When the gearbox is in neutral, all the gears are meshed & turning but none on them is locked to the shaft. So it is the friction between 6 spinning gears and the shaft that is turning the wheel.
No probs, I'll take your word for it, that sounds too technical for me :D

Gearboxes have always looked to complicated a piece of engineering for me to understand how they do what they do.

Russ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
944 Posts
:thumbsup:I'm with Rus on that last one.

I's recommend finding as local Harbor Freight and look for this collection of large sockets.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=5494

I got tired of trying to find large sockets, when I bought my first SSSA Sprint. Not to mention, the price Snap-On and Craftsman ere quoting, $60 was a steal (though I think I got mine on sale).

Don't get me wrong, my preference is on Craftsman tool when ever possible, but really, how often do sockets fail? And if it did, I can buy another set, and garage sale the left overs.

In any case, the SSSA on the S3 is cake to perform rear maintenence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
286 Posts
Don't get me wrong, my preference is on Craftsman tool when ever possible, but really, how often do sockets fail? And if it did, I can buy another set, and garage sale the left overs.
actually if you use your tools a lot, once in a while they do. I bought a cheaper set years ago and many of them have actually broke over the years. I just spend a little more (and not necessarily even because sears always does big craftsman sales) and never have to buy again!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
176 Posts
"I's recommend finding as local Harbor Freight and look for this collection of large sockets."

Is that in French? What the hell are you talking about Dave?

*SNICKER*
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
176 Posts
By the way, are you ever going to support this site? Or am I the the only one who REALLY loves Triumph? Hahahahahahaha!
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top