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I have the first gear clunk, but smooth everywhere else. I only use a dab of clutch between all the gears, and I'm on Maxima 10W-40. After switching to Maxima, coincidental or not, things are excellent!

Hope you solve it man, this transmission is wonderful.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I seem to remember my Bobber transmission being consistent and smooth across all the gears but then again that's purely how I'm remembering it.

Forgot to mention: to help rule out poor technique, I tried shifting very slowly and intently. Clutch in + throttle roll off, wait a second or two, attempt 3rd, and CLUNK! I was in 3rd.

It's interesting. Some of you are reporting that you only have the 1st gear clunk (I have yet to see a bike that didn't) while others are reporting behavior extremely similar to mine.
 

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seems all over the map. my bobber black is clunky every gear (admittedly it has less than 500 miles on it) and my TTR is smooth as butter 🤷‍♂️
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Have any of you fellow 'clunkers' brought this up to your dealer? I'm wondering if anyone has actually gotten a mechanical explanation for what is causing it.
 

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Triumph mechanics receive highly advanced training in reacting to the word 'noise'. If you say the word it's like reading the Russian code words to the Winter Soldier - they instantly flip from helpful Bucky's to cold-blooded robots. It doesn't matter if it's bearing noise, cam chain noise, spark plug arcing noise, or exploding engine noise - all you ever get is "they make noise - it's normal". You could literally roll up with the worst case of detonation on the planet and a full bag of marbles in your engine case, and they would shrug and walk off.

TLDR:

Triumph Service Dictionary defines 'noise' as the annoying but harmless sounds customers make.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
That's certainly disappointing. The neutral to first gear clunk is actually not that bad on my Speed Twin. It was worse on my Boulevard and is much worse on my MT-09. The latter sometimes jumps forward very, very slightly. As stupid as this may sound, the liquid-buttery smoothness of the higher gear shifts on the Triumph makes me wish they were all that smooth. I'll learn to live with it. If it starts actually shifting poorly then I'll revisit my dealer.
 

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Ahh the MT-09.... the Yammie 850 Triple may very well be the most perfect motorcycle engine ever developed! But I digress.
It is very sensitive to chain slack. It takes shockingly little slack in this bike - like 1/2" It is also oil sensitive. Both affect clutch and tranny performance. I've had this engine in 2 bikes now and in both cases it loved Motul 7100, liked Silkolene, loved Rotella, hated Mobil1, and shockingly hated Yamalube.

Just for funsies pull a stock dyno chart for this engine. I swear you could lay a ruler on the torque and HP lines from 2500-redline.
 

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Motul 7100 is very thin for a 10-40w. A very good oil but low viscosity at higher temperatures. I am pretty sure most of these dodgy gear change issues are clutch "drag" related. I've had similar issues with my Street triple which is slick as butter with 7100 in, but awful with a thicker 10-40 oil, like the bike doesn't even have a neutral...ruins the whole experience!
It's all very marginal and maybe something to do with clutch tolerances somewhere or other. Maybe a nice 5-40 would work for those with notchiness as the clutch basket will be cooler so maybe a thinner oil (5w) would work there without sacrificing anything (40w) on the hot bits, head, pistons, cylinders etc. Just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
For fun, I thought I'd look through some Youtube reviews to see if I can hear the sound. Here's one:


The link should start you at 3:00. Listen to the 2-3 shift. That's the sharp "thunk!" I get.
 

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@Grinnygrl agreed it is on the thinner side. I think it's around 13cSt at 100c. My WC Triumphs seem to do well on it, though.
I have to wonder... most of these oils have a very low ZDDP pack these days and the shift drum is a sliding surface - heck the whole shift mechanism is. Some oils, like Rotella, still have a higher ZDDP pack yet are still JASO MA1/2 so the are safe for wet clutches and catalysts. There are others as well. OP might try one to see if it helps.
I have a Harley FLSL that refused to find neutral - ever. Took the cover off and found it a couple hundred ml's over. Siphoned some out and low-and-behold it found neutral! Clutch drag due to heightened oil level is real and quite the headache on some machines.
 

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Have to agree the sound of the gear change clip sounds normal. Rarely do I ever ride without ear plugs but when I do I hear all sorts of things.
Ear plugs in keep riding.
 

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For fun, I thought I'd look through some Youtube reviews to see if I can hear the sound. Here's one:


The link should start you at 3:00. Listen to the 2-3 shift. That's the sharp "thunk!" I get.
I'm not sure what everybody else is listening to (maybe try earphones) but I can hear it clear as daylight, first to second smooth and quiet second to third clunk, although my ""clunk" does seem louder and I wear earplugs all the time.
Just shows you that noises are subjective and if you can't hear it from the video then maybe your bikes are the same and you just don't notice it or can't hear it, although what you don't get from the video is the feel of the knock through your foot.
I've also heard the noise on other videos when the reviewer hasn't mentioned it at all, and also listened while they crash down the gears without any thoughts of rev matching, clunk, clunk, clunk, so obviously some people are more mechanically sympathetic and sensitive to noises than others.
And just for the record my clutch and chain are perfectly adjusted and no they don't magically adjust themselves in between gear changes so if one more person tells me it's the clutch or the chain I'm going to go €#*[email protected]% mental :mad:
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Here's another one:


I'm guessing by the rolling stop that this was the 2-3 shift. Notice how you can hear the shift over the wind and voice audio.
 

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I have an observation on the clunky 2-3 shift on my 2017 Thruxton R. Yes, my bike is very definitely clunky on a 2-3 upshift, but since I balanced the throttles recently, it is noticeably less so. As CafRacer says, the 2-3 shift is absolutely smooth only at at very low RPM.
Another observation I have made is that with the bike up on a paddock stand with the engine running, I can engage any gear, and with the clutch lever pulled in the rear wheel will stay perfectly still. This indicates no drag at all to me. It's something I have not noticed on any other bike I have owned. The rear wheel will turn on all other bikes I've owned ie. slight drag.. To back this up, I find it dead easy to "paddle" the TTR backwards while in gear with engine running and clutch in.
Clunky shifting and no clutch drag seem kind of contradictory, but that's the way my TTR is. Strange. I use Castrol 10W50 motorcycle specific oil BTW.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I have an observation on the clunky 2-3 shift on my 2017 Thruxton R. Yes, my bike is very definitely clunky on a 2-3 upshift, but since I balanced the throttles recently, it is noticeably less so. As CafRacer says, the 2-3 shift is absolutely smooth only at at very low RPM.
Another observation I have made is that with the bike up on a paddock stand with the engine running, I can engage any gear, and with the clutch lever pulled in the rear wheel will stay perfectly still. This indicates no drag at all to me. It's something I have not noticed on any other bike I have owned. The rear wheel will turn on all other bikes I've owned ie. slight drag.. To back this up, I find it dead easy to "paddle" the TTR backwards while in gear with engine running and clutch in.
Clunky shifting and no clutch drag seem kind of contradictory, but that's the way my TTR is. Strange. I use Castrol 10W50 motorcycle specific oil BTW.
I experience the same thing. On a paddock stand, the rear wheel will stop moving completely in any gear. My initial thought was the clutch wasn't completely disengaging; causing load on the gears during the shift and hence the clunk.
 

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I can hear it too, I just don't think it is abnormal. The shift drum rotates, sliding the collar and engaging gear to the driven shaft. If there is load it can draw the collar in with some force resulting in a sound. If the tranny goes from unloaded to loaded suddenly you can hear the backlash being taken up. If the oil is on the thinner side it can become more audible as the parts engage. If the clutch has any drag then load exists which will result in a harder shift. I get concerned hearing grinding noise, which is typically the dogs skipping instead of engaging.
I wonder what a clutchless 2-3 on your bike would sound like, OP?
 

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I can hear it too, I just don't think it is abnormal
I think it's abnormal if it does it on every 2nd to 3rd gear change but it NEVER happens on any other gear change.
Also it can't be normal if many people claim theirs are smooth and silent, as is my other triumph.
I wonder what a clutchless 2-3 on your bike would sound like, OP?
I have a quick shifter on mine and it makes the the same noise whether I use the clutch or the quickshifter, the quick shifter only works properly above third anyway.
 
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