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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all,

I finally got my UK registration for my new to me T140V which enabled me to get it insured.

Over the past few weeks I've fitted new Handle bar bushes, changed the headlight to a UK spec one, checked oil and tyres, adjusted the clutch push rod which helped greatly with the lever action and have been practising the technique to start her up. It was a nice sunny afternoon in the UK, 31st of March, I was really looking forward to going for the first run. I got less than 1/2 a mile from the house and we spluttered to a halt. I tickled the carbs got fuel flowing and we started again. I returned straight home, the bike died on route and I coasted onto my drive. It was obviously fuel related, I was thinking a stuck float, blocked jet or fuel tap. With a full float, the bike ran very well which was a good thing.

I'd read good reviews on the Premier version of the Amal Carbs and thought, I'd just buy a set. It turns out that I they are unavailable until at least July now., I've left my order pending. Nothing for it but to take off the carbs, strip and clean. It didn't take long to figure out where the problem was, there is a rust in the tank which is getting stopped by the fuel filters.
750966


The reserve fuel line was full of rust, the main not so bad, but both filters were pretty badly blocked.
The Carbs were in pretty good order, but clearly have been stripped before, the floats are different colours and one of the gaskets looks home made; not a bad job was made of it though to be fair. The blockage explains why it took so long for the fuel to fill the bowls and seep over the ticklers and why it ran for a bit and then just died.
I've ordered new carb gaskets, clear fuel lines, an inline filter and new petcocks, which will arrive in a few days.

Next problem how to sort the tank out.
A quick inspection with a torch confirmed what I suspected, rust, but it wasn't as bad as it could be. Mainly on the bottom of the tank with patches all over the remainder. I've decided to attempt a rust removal exercise rather than a replacement, as a new tank is at least £500 and even then won't be as nicely painted.
I've looked at least ten You Tube Vids on how to fix this and settled on Evapo-Rust. It is probably not the best fix out there, but does the job, is safer and more eco-friendly and if it gets onto the floor won't burn a hole to Australia. I've bought 5L of the stuff, which I will add to the tank along with 70 old screws. Over the next four or five days I'll be turning the tank over regularly and wearing myself out shaking the screws around to further remove the rust.

Whilst the bike is down I've taken the wheels off and am going to have Avon Road Rider 2s fitted, the Dunlop K70's on the bike have cracks in the side wall.

It has not been all bad news though, I can't think of a better way to get to know your bike than to start taking it apart. I've never stripped an Amal before, easy when you know how.

When I'm all back up and running I'll send you picture.
 

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My brother has had a lot of success with molasses and water for rust removal on various external metal ware . Has a bowl with mixture in and all rusty parts are dropped in for a couple of days .
 

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I finally got my UK registration for my new to me T140V which enabled me to get it insured... I was really looking forward to going for the first run. I got less than 1/2 a mile from the house and we spluttered to a halt... It didn't take long to figure out where the problem was, there is a rust in the tank which is getting stopped by the fuel filters...settled on Evapo-Rust.
When I'm all back up and running I'll send you picture.
Well done and sorted, with a good plan going forward.

Carry on!
 

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Hi OGW,
I had a similar problem with a BSA tank, cleaning and descaling made a huge difference, but it did not completely stop the migration of oxide to the carburettor filters. I bought two strong flat Neodymium Magnets (cheap on E-bay) and stuck them to the bottom of the tank, any floating oxide is now captured and held in one spot away from the petrol taps. Every 3 years or so, I remove the magnets and flush the tank.
Unfortunately modern Ethanol based petrol absorbs water, if left in the tank for any period the water drops out of the fuel and sits in a layer at the bottom-hence your rust layer at the bottom of the tank.
If possible try to avoid standard 5% Ethanol blend fuel. This means purchasing premium blends, unfortunately most of the premium blends now have added Ethanol. As far as I am aware, only Esso premium blend fuel (Synergy supreme+ 99) is guaranteed to be Ethanol free. However it is a year since I checked, so this information might be out of date.

Good luck with your tank.
Best Regards
Peg.
 
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........ I bought two strong flat Neodymium Magnets (cheap on E-bay) and stuck them to the bottom of the tank, any floating oxide is now captured and held in one spot away from the petrol taps. Every 3 years or so, I remove the magnets and flush the tank.
Unfortunately modern Ethanol based petrol absorbs water, if left in the tank for any period the water drops out of the fuel and sits in a layer at the bottom-hence your rust layer at the bottom of the tank.
If possible try to avoid standard 5% Ethanol blend fuel. This means purchasing premium blends, unfortunately most of the premium blends now have added Ethanol. As far as I am aware, only Esso premium blend fuel (Synergy supreme+ 99) is guaranteed to be Ethanol free. However it is a year since I checked, so this information might be out of date.
Hi Peg, that sounds a really good idea but I'd be interested to know how you get the magnets out of the tank for cleaning. As they are pretty strong and will hang on well the only thing I can think of is a bit of wire wrapped around them as a "handle".

EDIT: I see on ebay you can get neodymium "fishing recovery magnets" which are round and have a built-in loop at the top. Might have answered my own question!

I've been using Esso Supreme 99+ myself for a while and I've just checked their web site again today: still ethanol-free except in Devon, Cornwall, North Wales, North England and Scotland.

Regards,
Brian
 

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Hi,
my new to me T140V
What year? Your picture in your first post says it's somewhere between '76 and '78?

Premier version of the Amal Carbs
turns out that I they are unavailable until at least July now.,
Also discussed from post #488 in the "1976 t140 new to me" thread; apparently, Burton Bike Bits might have some, or Morrie's Place (in the US) does.

new
clear fuel lines
Clear is (y) for visual checks on fuel delivery but, before fitting, check whatever you're sent is effinol-resistant.

new
carb gaskets
inline filter
If you aren't replacing the existing carbs., if you don't have any service history, conventional wisdom says replace the needle jets and needles, jets because they're brass and the engine sucks the steel needles against the edge of the jets, wearing them oval, causing richness that won't clear without new jets.

Also be careful where you buy Amal parts from, Amal suffers particularly from pirate parts, sometimes supplied in "Amal"-logoed packaging! Any doubts about a source, buy from Amal directly.

new petcocks,
Not limited to Amal, crappy parts are common. :mad: When you get the new taps, turn the levers to the open positions and ensure a 3/16" OD rod, drill bit, etc. will pass all the way through. 3/16" ID was the original tap hole ID, some pattern taps are smaller. (n) Also be aware that some crappy tap seals swell when they come into contact with the dreaded effinol, blocking the tap. 😖

While we're spending your money ... :) rubber brake hoses ... Original maker Lockheed said they should not be used beyond ten years old ... If no history with your bike, consider changing them. fluid and master and slave cylinder seals? Old hoses are known to delaminate internally, broken bits then acting as 'one-way valves', preventing brakes releasing or being applied.

tank
70 old screws.
wearing myself out shaking the screws around to further remove the rust.
If your tank will fit inside your tumble-drier, consider wrapping it securely in an old duvet/blankets, solidly in the drum, have the drier do the hard work?

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi OGW,
I had a similar problem with a BSA tank, cleaning and descaling made a huge difference, but it did not completely stop the migration of oxide to the carburettor filters. I bought two strong flat Neodymium Magnets (cheap on E-bay) and stuck them to the bottom of the tank, any floating oxide is now captured and held in one spot away from the petrol taps. Every 3 years or so, I remove the magnets and flush the tank.
Unfortunately modern Ethanol based petrol absorbs water, if left in the tank for any period the water drops out of the fuel and sits in a layer at the bottom-hence your rust layer at the bottom of the tank.
If possible try to avoid standard 5% Ethanol blend fuel. This means purchasing premium blends, unfortunately most of the premium blends now have added Ethanol. As far as I am aware, only Esso premium blend fuel (Synergy supreme+ 99) is guaranteed to be Ethanol free. However it is a year since I checked, so this information might be out of date.

Good luck with your tank.
Best Regards
Peg.
Peg,
Magnets, now that really is a great idea.
You could stick them underneath the tank rather than inside.
But with a small hole drilled through them, so long as it doesn't affecting the magnetisation, I could attached them to an old guitar string. They could then go inside the tank and be fished out a couple of times a year and cleaned up.
Thank you for the suggestion.
 

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May I point out that common rust, red iron oxide (Fe3O4), is not magnetic (although black oxide - Fe2O3 - is, although much less weakly than iron itself.)
 

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The stuff that grows in bio ethanol, if left to fester, is brown and looks surprisingly like rust but it’s not.
 

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The few times I've cleaned a tank out I've used some light chain to shake about inside. So much easier to fish out afterwards
 

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Hi
I just stick them to the bottom of the tank on the outside, I don’t put them inside., so the bottom of the tank is magnetic.
It seems to hold everything together until I remove the magnets and flush it every few years.
Regards
Peg.
 

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The magnets are stuck on external to the tank. They do not go inside. I have had magnets on my tanks for many years now. It will pick up quite a bit of rust and hold it within the tank until a flush. The ones i use are about 25mmx10mm and one each side near the fuel taps. The magnets are extremely strong and i also have one stuck on the bottom of the frame tube beside the drain bolt. Putting a spanner on the bolt is difficult as the magnet will grab the spanner.
 

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Hi OldGrey, I had similar problem. Lots of ways to clean rust. Evaporites works good.
What about paint. Thoughtful cleaning no paint damage
However once tank starts rusting it seems to accelerate in rusting. Mostly above fuel line. I used magnet & paper automotive filters. That protected carbs. A few years later tank rusted pin hole in top. Very tiny seep. Looking in with mirror lots of rust up there. Lots!! of rust. Obviously soon would be many pin holes. I cleaned tank again, protecting original paint. I then lined tank, again protecting paint with Kreem paint protector. 3 coats.
Did final flush. with Acetone.
After much research I used Caswell tank liner. I choose clear so I could monitor new rust formation.
Been 3.5 years. Zero new rust. Liner sealed pin hole. Zero paint damage.
You need at least the 10 gal kit. I got the automotive size which worked well. The center tube is hard to cover, the larger kit really helps. Let it cure a full 10 days. Obviously a lot of waste, but I got 100% coverage.
A big job & time consuming. Done right it works really good.
100% E10 fuel proof.
Kreem paint protector works really good. Kreem liner is junk! Don’t use it!! I don’t know what you can get in UK. The Caswell formula is used to good success in industry. Like every thing else prep is everything. Careful mixing is very important. Don’t introduce bubbles. It indeed will stick to light tight rust. Heavy rust no.
Don
 

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Hi OG,

+1 for what Don says about the Caswell epoxy liner kits. I've done both of my Triumphs and I'd not use anything else. Definitely produces a well-lined tank.
 

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Great topic! Really helpful replies as well. It took me around 9 weeks to get my ex Minnesota 1973 T140V registered back here in Lincolnshire in the UK Just waiting for the warmer weather to creep in and I will be back out on my 3rd T140 over many years. Mine is a total restoration job, so although I am assuming that the fuel tank is clear of any oxides, I will get the torch out tomorrow, plus check the fuel taps and filters. I was not aware of the different petrol types, worrying, so will check that out as well. We all tend to use the local fuel stations.
I suppose I could place a few brass screws in the tank that would roll around naturally, but maybe also be heard?
Super advice on here, thanks to all, Liam
 

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I suppose I could place a few brass screws in the tank that would roll around naturally, but maybe also be heard?
Hi Liam, I put a couple of handfuls of old nuts and bolts, screws etc in my tanks with a dose of HG Rust Remover and left them in for a couple of days, rolling the tank round every few hours. It foams a bit at first then converts the rust to something else (my A level Chemistry at Boston Grammar was a long time ago!). Tipped the whole lot out, washed them out several times and left the tanks to dry over a storage radiator for a few days.

Then used the Caswell epoxy as per the instructions. Do it somewhere warm and get your skates on, it goes off in about 15 minutes.

I found the motorcycle size kit was not quite enough even on a US spec tank, and the car size kit way too much on a UK spec tank. The epoxy found a small pinhole on my Tiger 750 (US spec tank) and that's not leaked since treatment.

It forms a hard, clear coating that looks perfect a couple of years down the line.

As bought5.JPG


Yes, I know. The tank should be blue/white on a '73....... Maybe one day.
 

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"Yes, I know. The tank should be blue/white on a '73....... Maybe one day"
My 1973 T140V was imported back to the UK from the US last year, it originally had an identical tank as yours. Now black, wish it was still original colours, Liam
 

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Hi all,

I finally got my UK registration for my new to me T140V which enabled me to get it insured.

Over the past few weeks I've fitted new Handle bar bushes, changed the headlight to a UK spec one, checked oil and tyres, adjusted the clutch push rod which helped greatly with the lever action and have been practising the technique to start her up. It was a nice sunny afternoon in the UK, 31st of March, I was really looking forward to going for the first run. I got less than 1/2 a mile from the house and we spluttered to a halt. I tickled the carbs got fuel flowing and we started again. I returned straight home, the bike died on route and I coasted onto my drive. It was obviously fuel related, I was thinking a stuck float, blocked jet or fuel tap. With a full float, the bike ran very well which was a good thing.

I'd read good reviews on the Premier version of the Amal Carbs and thought, I'd just buy a set. It turns out that I they are unavailable until at least July now., I've left my order pending. Nothing for it but to take off the carbs, strip and clean. It didn't take long to figure out where the problem was, there is a rust in the tank which is getting stopped by the fuel filters.
View attachment 750966

The reserve fuel line was full of rust, the main not so bad, but both filters were pretty badly blocked.
The Carbs were in pretty good order, but clearly have been stripped before, the floats are different colours and one of the gaskets looks home made; not a bad job was made of it though to be fair. The blockage explains why it took so long for the fuel to fill the bowls and seep over the ticklers and why it ran for a bit and then just died.
I've ordered new carb gaskets, clear fuel lines, an inline filter and new petcocks, which will arrive in a few days.

Next problem how to sort the tank out.
A quick inspection with a torch confirmed what I suspected, rust, but it wasn't as bad as it could be. Mainly on the bottom of the tank with patches all over the remainder. I've decided to attempt a rust removal exercise rather than a replacement, as a new tank is at least £500 and even then won't be as nicely painted.
I've looked at least ten You Tube Vids on how to fix this and settled on Evapo-Rust. It is probably not the best fix out there, but does the job, is safer and more eco-friendly and if it gets onto the floor won't burn a hole to Australia. I've bought 5L of the stuff, which I will add to the tank along with 70 old screws. Over the next four or five days I'll be turning the tank over regularly and wearing myself out shaking the screws around to further remove the rust.

Whilst the bike is down I've taken the wheels off and am going to have Avon Road Rider 2s fitted, the Dunlop K70's on the bike have cracks in the side wall.

It has not been all bad news though, I can't think of a better way to get to know your bike than to start taking it apart. I've never stripped an Amal before, easy when you know how.

When I'm all back up and running I'll send you picture.
I've had good results cleaning several rusted tanks using reverse electrolysis, I think that a good term for it. It involves connecting a low DC voltage to the tank (battery charger or just a battery) and a simple iron/steel electrode, filling the tank with a simple solution of water, then just let it percolate for hours or several days. You can see it working by the bubbles it produces. You will be left with a bare 'gray metal' steel interior that you can then coat with a product like 'Kreem' to completely insulate the steel from any further corrosion. Study and comply with the instruction available on internet or YouTube. No, this isn't alchemy. It's well established for cleaning any rusted item. It really works and is permanent.
 

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Hi all,

I finally got my UK registration for my new to me T140V which enabled me to get it insured.

Over the past few weeks I've fitted new Handle bar bushes, changed the headlight to a UK spec one, checked oil and tyres, adjusted the clutch push rod which helped greatly with the lever action and have been practising the technique to start her up. It was a nice sunny afternoon in the UK, 31st of March, I was really looking forward to going for the first run. I got less than 1/2 a mile from the house and we spluttered to a halt. I tickled the carbs got fuel flowing and we started again. I returned straight home, the bike died on route and I coasted onto my drive. It was obviously fuel related, I was thinking a stuck float, blocked jet or fuel tap. With a full float, the bike ran very well which was a good thing.

I'd read good reviews on the Premier version of the Amal Carbs and thought, I'd just buy a set. It turns out that I they are unavailable until at least July now., I've left my order pending. Nothing for it but to take off the carbs, strip and clean. It didn't take long to figure out where the problem was, there is a rust in the tank which is getting stopped by the fuel filters.
View attachment 750966

The reserve fuel line was full of rust, the main not so bad, but both filters were pretty badly blocked.
The Carbs were in pretty good order, but clearly have been stripped before, the floats are different colours and one of the gaskets looks home made; not a bad job was made of it though to be fair. The blockage explains why it took so long for the fuel to fill the bowls and seep over the ticklers and why it ran for a bit and then just died.
I've ordered new carb gaskets, clear fuel lines, an inline filter and new petcocks, which will arrive in a few days.

Next problem how to sort the tank out.
A quick inspection with a torch confirmed what I suspected, rust, but it wasn't as bad as it could be. Mainly on the bottom of the tank with patches all over the remainder. I've decided to attempt a rust removal exercise rather than a replacement, as a new tank is at least £500 and even then won't be as nicely painted.
I've looked at least ten You Tube Vids on how to fix this and settled on Evapo-Rust. It is probably not the best fix out there, but does the job, is safer and more eco-friendly and if it gets onto the floor won't burn a hole to Australia. I've bought 5L of the stuff, which I will add to the tank along with 70 old screws. Over the next four or five days I'll be turning the tank over regularly and wearing myself out shaking the screws around to further remove the rust.

Whilst the bike is down I've taken the wheels off and am going to have Avon Road Rider 2s fitted, the Dunlop K70's on the bike have cracks in the side wall.

It has not been all bad news though, I can't think of a better way to get to know your bike than to start taking it apart. I've never stripped an Amal before, easy when you know how.

When I'm all back up and running I'll send you picture.
a good tip is to use a 2 foot length of small chain instead of loose screws much easier to fish out than trying to find and remove the last half a dozen screws
Cheers mark
 
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