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Discussion Starter #1
Just curious because I don't get it...though I love the look of the Scambler, why would anyone want an exhaust pipe running right under their thigh? If you use it off-road, would you really want to go down with the pipe right there? I'm sure the heat shields work well but... . I put the thread here as to not offend the Scambler owners because I really do think the bike looks great. Thought some of you air twin folks might have owned Scramblers before or could enlighten me on their pipes.
 

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I think it's so the pipes don't bang on rocks and stuff when riding offroad. I demo'd the Scrambler 1200 a couple months ago and I can tell you the pipe does get very hot even with the shield and I touched my thigh on it several times while stopped at traffic lights in the city. I suppose you might get used to only putting your left foot down when stopped but the constant risk of burning myself put me off. I bought a T120 instead.
 

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It's historical. Or maybe that should be hysterical. I personally would not want the exhaust there either. But, if you are really going off road, probably standing up as much as sitting. For a road bike, no thanks.
 

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I've never burnt my leg on mine. I've gone over on the right side and had my leg stuck under the bike before - not even any burn marks on my clothing. The heat shields work.
 

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It's put there for ground clearance reasons (if you actually take if off road). I'm not a huge fan of the way the heat shields look, but they do work. Never had a leg burning problem for me or my passenger.
 

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I'm not sure, but the leg burning could also be related to the riders size. A taller rider would have longer legs that stay away from the pipes better. Whereas the shorter rider would have a shorter leg and cause more leg burns. Or so my old thought process goes....
 

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I like the look, and I get the concept, but I hate how it limits your luggage choices so much. Can't have a pair of saddlebags as easy.

Only once I ran through water deep enough that I was worried about flooding my pipes, that was during a torrential storm when Winons got flooded, and I had my wife's SE. Water shooting up from storm sewers. I was riding on the sidewalk she get a couple of inches higher, and had to hope I hit the handicap ramps at the intersections. It was epic.

Anyways, that doesn't come up often. I think I like the lower pipes for touring and routine forest service road stuff, easier to carry gear.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
All great explanations. Thanks everyone. Hadn’t given the high water a thought but makes sense. I’ve ridden off road a good bit but never through water more than a foot deep.
 

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Wouldn't intake rather than exhaust be more of a problem in deep water? As long as you keep the revs up, would water get back up the exhaust? I know it didn't that time I drove my car through water so deep that it came over the headlights. I was wondering why it suddenly went dark!
 

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Ground clearance and river crossings.

See the scratches on the engine cover case and the missing brake pedal? When big rocks hit it's better to have a bash plate take the beating and your expensive exhaust system well away.

Screenshot 2019-07-19 at 12.52.13.jpg

But if you need neither, fit anything you want and avoid the occasional thigh burn
 

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I have the Arrow 2 into 1 fitted, looks good, sounds great and really doesn't get that hot......... My right leg touches the guard when I put both feet down and quite often I'm wearing normal jeans, never noticed it being an issue..........
 

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High pipes

I have the Arrow 2 into 1 fitted, looks good, sounds great and really doesn't get that hot......... My right leg touches the guard when I put both feet down and quite often I'm wearing normal jeans, never noticed it being an issue..........
I gotta reinforce my point for anyone considering a Scrambler (I was until I demo'd one)....

I've only ridden a bike with high pipes once and it was the 1200 XC Scrambler and it was around the suburban streets of Oshawa Canada at rush hour about a month ago. Rush hour anywhere in the greater Toronto area means lots of waiting in traffic for multiple light cycles. Traffic is BAD here. I live in downtown Toronto so invariably I sit in traffic on my bike a lot and I tend to alternate left and right legs to prop the bike up in these situations. On the Scrambler my right thigh got very hot - definitely close to the point of visible burns (I never actually looked to see if I had a burn but it felt like it for a day or two after). I'm actually a little surprised when other people say they never notice the heat from these pipes because from my experience it's not possible to ignore. It was HOT. Could be a thing with sitting stationary on the bike, in which case folks who live outside of cities might not experience it as much.

If I had one complaint about my Bonneville (and this is mostly just nitpicky) it's that the engine gives off a lot of radiant heat anyway, which can a bit overwhelming when it's also 32 degrees Celsius (approx 90F) in downtown Toronto (like today) and I'm wearing a jeans, a leather jacket and gloves. The high pipes were more than just uncomfortable though - it was a burning hot metal surface touching my leg. TBH, I was really close to buying a 1200 Scrambler but after riding it I knew I would have to replace the high pipes with a new system to make the bike workable as my city commuter. I would caution other city riders to demo a scrambler around town before buying to make sure they can tolerate that heat.
 

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I think we're talking about very different bikes - The OP seems to have wanted some background info on the air cooled models, although looks interested in the liquid cooled; maybe thinking these have hotter high pipes - who knows?

I'm given information about the air cooled models as asked for, your info is probably more relevant to the OP but it's regarding the liquid cooled bikes and not the air cooled. I've not ridden one of the newer bikes so can't say for sure but they may well be a lot hotter, it certainly sounds like it.............
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Edd_.e, that is one Mad Max road warrior machine you’ve got there. Sounds like you need a good helmet AND a personal flotation device where you ride! ? Stay safe.
 

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Tbh, unless I was actually planning on doing a lot of riding in the bush, I would not buy a bike with high exhaust.
 

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Edd_.e, that is one Mad Max road warrior machine you’ve got there. Sounds like you need a good helmet AND a personal flotation device where you ride! ? Stay safe.
To be honest, if you're riding the bike stock with the OEM exhaust shields like the ones below you will never burn your leg. The gap from the shields to the actual pipes is large enough for them to never get very hot at all, dare I say cool enough to touch with your hand. It's when you start messing with them and adding aftermarket parts, or you could always exhaust wrap it...

Screenshot 2019-07-22 at 11.54.09.jpg

The brackets leave a gap of about 2cm from pipes and minimise contact area

B892EEBA-2AB4-46FC-930C-AE1508B99982_1563794552285.jpeg
 

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They put high pipes on off road bikes for the reason mentioned. If you don't ride off road, then you don't NEED high pipes. So the question is why would you buy one that had them if you don't?
Because you like the "looks"?
Being a slave to fashion always involves compromise. ;)

If you are afraid of burning your leg, isn't that nearer the bottom of the list of the dangers of riding a bike on the road?

I had off road bikes fall on me a few times with the pipe falling on my leg, never got burned, as normally your first action when this happens is to push the bike off you, not lay there waiting for the pipe to cook you.

You feel folks wear pants when you ride don't you?
 

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To be honest, if you're riding the bike stock with the OEM exhaust shields like the ones below you will never burn your leg.
This. The heat shields are bigger than they really need to be, but my guess is that Triumph wanted to make sure no one would ever burn their leg on their exhaust. And they did a good job - I sit in traffic every day on my Scrambler and I've never had an issue with the side pipes.
 
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