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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just traded out a 72' BMW R90 for a 68' TR6R with 3200 origional miles. I have NO background in Triumphs and figure I'll ride it this season and give it a good going over next winter. I've ordered the Haynes Manual but have some very very basic questions.
1. How do you know what the correct engine oil level is in the side oil reservoir?
2. I'm looking at refilling the engine and case with Castrol SAE 20/50. The chain box with???
3. Can the gators be replaced with out disassembling the forks?
4. Who would be good US suppliers for parts? I have a couple misc. items I'm looking at replacing:
chain cover
headlight retainer ring
wiring harness

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

L
 

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hi lo bo...dont put oil in the engine,its a dry sump.you only need to fill the oil tank.your gearbox would use ep 80 or 90.the primary woud be ok with 20/50 engine oil.make sure it does not have friction modifiers or the clutch will slip.these engines work great on 20/50.thats the oil that was used when they were new.wait till you get your manual before tinkering,you might do more damage.the haynes will give you lots of info.get a clymer and a factory manual as well.
if you pay for my flight over there,i will do it all for you........ :hammer: :hammer:
 

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A Triumph parts book would be a great help also. Mine has alot of illustrations in case I forget how something goes back together. :???: Lots of good dealers, as parts are plentiful. I'll let someone with a 60's bike make some recommendations. It won't be long. This site is essential for a triumph newbie. I've got alot of help and I'm a triumph newbie with years of H-D experience. Different ballgame. Lots of good guy's with good experience. No question to dumb. Okie
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
lobo
An English car forum which I read had a thread about oil recently. It seems that all the API oils have removed the anti-wear additives (something to do with EPA) and engine rebuilders are starting to see cam and follower failures. You might want to research this.
My '67 required removing the stanchions from the triple clamps. If you try to put the "dust excluder sleeve nut" on from the bottom you will tear the seal on the shoulder at the bottom of the stanchion; it has to go on from the top.
I bought both the Triumph manual and parts book and get a lot of use out of both.
For parts, I have had good luck with both Domi Racer 877-451-0354 (ask for Tony or Tom) and Morries Place 815-678-3118 (ask for Ed). These guys are friendly, helpful and knowedgeable. Neither one has that "press 1 press 2" answering machine.
Good Luck Tom
 

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After researching this question on a number of forums and oil company websites, I am using SG rated 20/50 non-synthetic BMW motorcycle oil. It doesn't have the friction reducers that modern car oils have and has better corrosion resistive additives. The friction reducers can cause clutch slip in Triumphs because they have a clutch that picks up oil in the primary case. The corrosion additives were taken out of modern oils because they damage catalytic converters.
The oil mentioned is probably the closest thing to what oils were in the day when the bikes we ride were new. I was using Castrol GTX 20/50 and after the switch to the BMW oil have lot less clutch slip on take off. The BMW oil is also relatively inexpensive, I paid less than 4.00$ a quart. Just my thoughts on a controversial subject.
 

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On 2007-02-23 07:35, htown16 wrote:
After researching this question on a number of forums and oil company websites, I am using SG rated 20/50 non-synthetic BMW motorcycle oil. It doesn't have the friction reducers that modern car oils have and has better corrosion resistive additives. The friction reducers can cause clutch slip in Triumphs because they have a clutch that picks up oil in the primary case. The corrosion additives were taken out of modern oils because they damage catalytic converters.
The oil mentioned is probably the closest thing to what oils were in the day when the bikes we ride were new. I was using Castrol GTX 20/50 and after the switch to the BMW oil have lot less clutch slip on take off. The BMW oil is also relatively inexpensive, I paid less than 4.00$ a quart. Just my thoughts on a controversial subject.
htown,the 68 model we speak of here has possibly got a seperated primary chaincase so has its own oil.i believe it was 1969 that the crank oil seal was ommitted and the breather fitted to the primary.good idea using a20/50 bmw oil though.dont ever see it in the uk
 

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I have a 68 Bonneville converted to a Tiger top end, running a Routt 750 kit, Jomo 15 cams, 1978 T140 five speed, lightened stock clutch, 3 phase alternator...no battery, Black Diamond valves, Ampco 45 guides, light valve train, tall final drive gearing. I used it as my transportaton (I didn't even HAVE a car license) for over 10 years and put over 85,000 miles on the engine after the rebuild in 1995. It is currently still doing duty in a friend's bike as I rebuild his TR 7 engine for his chopper while I redo the frame and bodywork (original faded paint.)
Here is what you do.
Run the bike to get the oil and engine hot.
Drain the tank and the crankcase of engine oil. The drain plug for the case it the angled one with about a 13/16" hex. The drain plug for the tank is 3/8 BS. Change the angle of the bike to get all the oil out of the tank and engine. With the plugs out, kick the engine over to remove all the oil that you can from the lines and passages.
Put the drainplugs and spark plugs back in and put a quart of full synthetic Amsoil or Royal Purple (or even Mobil one NON-ENERGY conserving) 10W-30 in the tank. Run it for fifteen minutes or so....a trip to the beer store is about right. Drain while hot, following the previous instructions. This time, fill the tank with three quarts of the synthlube.
Drain the primary case by removing a hard to access plug (1/4BS) at the bottom rear of the case (not in the cover....that is a level plug). You may have to remove the left peg to get access, especially if you take this opportunity to also adjust the primary chain....there is a special tool for this, but it can be made from a bolt ground to a screwdriver tip. If you want instructions on this, ask later.
This will drain slowly, because the adjuster is in the way, but give it a half hour and you should be done. Plug back in and all the other stuff back on and fill the primary case through the slotted plug on top of the primary case, rear of the cylinders with 1/3 quart of synthetic ATF. Even Dexron is better primary oil than the factory's recommended 20wt oil. ATF is designed to work with wet clutches to provide good operation of the clutch and good lube of the gears.
Drain the gearbox oil from the plug in the bottom of the case which as a second smaller bolt in the center. It is close to the right frame tube. It is also a BS hex. I think it's 1/2BS. Don't remove the long plunger housing with the rounded bottom. Rock the bike to get the most of the oil out. It will stink of sulfur compunds, as it's probably hypoid 90 wt. Put the plug back in and fill with a half quart of full synthetic 75/85 or 75/90 gear oil. The kind that goes in differentials. Your bike has hobbed, unlapped gears and shouldn't use motorcycle or engine oil in the gearbox. It must have high pressure additives. Hence the stink. I would change this oil out after about 500 miles with the second half of the synthetic. Now you are lubed up for a good long ride. As long as your bike isn't running really rich or has some mechanical problem, and if you aren't hotrodding about, you will be able to go 8K miles between changes.
I will be pulling my engine down and taking some photos of the results of it's life with synthetic lubricants. But I have had flawless reliability with it. I even removed the oil filter when, after doing a postmortem on a couple of filter elements, I found no metal particles. So the last 40K or so has been run sans filter, like most old bikes, but has been subjected to the travesties of city riding and high speed touring on the Big Island, and everything in between.
 

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Wasn't sure when the switch to the primary sharing oil with the engine was made. Mechannica's right about using ATF in primary in those that don't. The oil I mentioned definitely improved the clutch in mine which does share oil. Also, the anti corrosion additive package is better in both the synthetic and dino motorcycle oils. Mechannica, you didn't mention what weight to use to replace 10/30 flush.
 

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Same, I run 10/30 in the engine all the time. The change to shared engine/primary occured in 1970. If you have the big vent tube out of the upper rear of your engine, you have shared engine/primary oil.
5/20 may even be better on a newly rebuilt engine with tight clearances. The recycle velocity of the oil is much higher with the lower viscosity oil, so carries more heat away more quickly.
 

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Think I'll stick with 20/50 W per the facotry recommendation.
 

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The oils made today, even the mineral oils, have significantly different characteristics and chemistries compared to the oils made in the 60s.

The factory also recommended 20 wt engine oil for the primary, when synthetic ATF works so much better.
They used cast iron valve guides for a long time, too, then switched to phosphor bronze. Now you can get Nickel bronze guides which work better and last longer than iron OR PB. Would you use iron guides?
They used untreated GS valves forever. Now you can get Black Diamond nitrided valves. I'd never use an original valve if I could help it.
They used untreated "soft" cams until 1969. Would I put the old soft cams back in my engine? Never.
They used a relatively small capacity oil pump up through the mid 60s. Would I go buy a NOS early pump, or install the best of the bunch, the 750 short rod pump?
They used K70 Dunlop tires. Would I fit one now? Not if I actually planned to ride my bike, instead of showing it or putting it in a museum.
They used zinc plated spokes and steel chrome plated nipples, would I lace up a wheel with them? No. Stainless only.
They used a headlamp that capably lit up your front fender, providing that the filament hadn't vibrated to death. Do I use that? No. H4 only.
They used nitrocellulose paint. Would I use that, even if I could get it for only twice the price of modern paint? No.
They didn't topcoat the paint jobs. Would I run the decals on top without clearcoating. I have, but I wouldn't choose that.

So, it is silly to assume that the choices made by the factory forty or fifity years ago should be the standards for today. Unless you like to decoke and rebuild on a regular basis. I don't. I like the reliability and economy afforded by modern materials in my old motorcycles. Triumph made a long list of improvements as the years went by, and made some mistakes, so I don't see why I shouldn't carry on their tradition and make improvements when applicable and delete mistakes. It's just what the factory did.
 

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How do you know what the correct engine oil level is in the side oil reservoir?

My '69 TR6R has little gold letters on the side of the oil tank that say:

"___________MINIMUM OIL LEVEL___________".

If it's not there, you've voided your warrantee! :razz:
 

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LOL...you noticed that too eh?

You need to buy a pair of those X-Ray glasses they used to sell in the back of magazines. :)
 

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where can one obtain those stickers anyway? I am buying a bike & need to paint the oil tank & side cover back to it's original black. I would like to have the stickers for it.
 

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i was always able to replace the fork gaiters without dismateling the forks..
remove wheel, fender, fender stays.. ease gaiters up forks carefully..

this is on a 69 t100, i assume the 650's have the same front end. -j
 

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stickers

Clamp,
I'm sure there are plenty of places, but I recently received mine from klempfs.com. Just call the number on the site 507 374 2222) and they can help you out.

Bryan
 

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for oil level... In the absence of anyone elses input, have teh return hole in teh pipe inside the oil tank about 1/2" above the oil for an acceptable level.

With regard to oil... There is a whole bunch of different ideas. Originally these engines were designed for straight grade oils, the multigrade oils are a huge improvement because they prevent oil starvation when cold. Someone suggested using 20/50 sg oil from BMW. This is possibly one of teh best. What people often fail to understand about oil ratings is they are the maximum rating, not minimum as you might expect. They indicate the maximum amount of anti wear properties in teh oil for modern catalytic converts to deal with. SG is the grade that allows the most anti wear properties, if the oil states it is compatible with many grades it will be below the 'least' effective grade. It also happens that 20/50 grades are thick oils meant for old engines only and are therefor exempt exceeding the maximum amounts of anti wear properties because old engines do not have catalytic converters. BMW SG oil exceeds teh SG rating by more than a factor of three.

if petrol were graded like oil, kerosene could be sold as 100 octane because it does not exceed 100 octane. Once you understand this, you understand oil gradings.
 
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