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Discussion Starter #1
Ok so my dads bonny finally made to my place last night. All the reading I have done says the oil will be in the sump but I pulled dipstick and the frame is full of oil any concerns is this a good thing or bad ? This bike hasn't been ridden it over 20 years or run. Also anybody have suggestion on jet size and what slide cut to use for colorado elevation also suggestions on needle settings? Who has the best prices on carbs parts ?
 

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there isn't a sump as in the true sense.

there will be a few cc's in the bottom of the engine(150cc?) but with a Triumph, the oil is held in the tank/frame and circulates via the pump. If some grit causes a valve in the pump to lodge partly open, it can fill the bottom of the engine.

Yours sounds ok.

I'd get her going before you play with the carbs.

Some would dump the old oil first, some would run it as is and then change the oil.

Make sure that you buy fresh oil of the correct type (20-50 "classic" type) plus fresh gaskets for the base of the oil tank. (2)



The best mod that you can do is fit an external canister type oil filter that will collect all the gunk and allows easy changes. It's a matterof strong opinion aboutdraining or cleaning the filter at the true sump, in the engine.

I would clean it, but you need to be surgically clean under the engine before you start to undo the drain plug. Clean under the engine with paraffin and a toothbrush. use a strong light and a mirror so it's clean enough to eat off before goinmg in and removing the filter, which you again clean with paraffin. Replace it and add a little oil.

You need to avoid the chance of a tiny bit of grit entering the engine.

You can poutfresh oil in via the pushrod tubes or via the timing slot hiole behind the engine (clean [email protected])

Check that oil recirculates by checking the top of the oil tank
make sure that you know which drain plug is which, it's easy to confuse it with the gear box one, or the plungerfor the gear change.
It's the angled one.

Look up youtube for LUNMAD vids. he does an oil change and you'll see what he does
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well the issue is with carbs the bike has sat for 20 years and has gunk in the bowls and the main jet is to large being it went from less then a 1000 feet to over 5000 so I was going to upgrade the carb with the stay up float kit the right jet sizes and the hard slides while it was apart. I already plan on getting an oil filter setup for it is well.
 

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You'll need to remove the air-mixture screws and clean the pilot jets with a wire or drill no bigger than 0.016" diameter.The wire should go at least 1-1/2" into the carb body if the jet is clear.
Replace the needle-jets with 105 needle-jets.It will then run fine up to 3/4 throttle.If it 8-strokes at full throttle with the 190 jets,fit 170 main jets.If it doesn't 8-stroke with 190,fit 180 mains.If you find brass float needles,replace them with aluminium needles.You'll obviously need float bowl gaskets (grease them and they won't tear apart next time).Everything else in the carbs will work fine,the way it is.

You could drain and re-fill the primary case and gearbox immediately.
Prime the rocker spindle oil feed line with an oil can before you start the engine.The oil light should go out within one or two kicks of the starter.It should certainly be off when the engine has started.

Warm the engine,then drain the oil from the tank.Clean the filter and re-fill with fresh oil.I wouldn't be tempted to remove the crankcase drain plug.It won't cause any problem if you leave it untouched.

There's not much to gain with "stay up" floats.They make it easy to change fuel level,but then you should check the actual fuel level as it will be when the engine is running 0.170"-0.240" below the top of the bowls.With early floats you can set it static;float toe 0.080" below top of bowl.

Anodisied slides are good.Stainless steel sleeves on original slides are even better,in my opinion.It's easy to turn down a slide and fit a stainless sleeve;give it 0.0035" clearance in the slide bore.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks pete the bike does have brass needles also I found something interesting the left carb had a 3.5 slide in and a 3 in right. Also is easy to find axle caps for the bottom of the forks both of mine are cracked in half. I thought the stay up floats were need to deal with ethanol fuel.
 

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The stamped numbers in slides aren't exactly accurate.Sometimes a "3-1/2" can be more like 3.How do the slides measure?They should both have 3/16" of cutaway.

You can buy stronger fork caps to replace the original cast caps.1/2 the trouble was the wrong torque settings in the manual,which worked fine on earlier steel forks.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Not sure how they measure I will check them tommorow evening that was what I was basing it on the cast numbers on the bottom. An idea who makes the fork caps ?
 

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get the CNC'd ones They are less prone to cracking. I doubt that you can get cast ones any more. You need to be careful and still follow the book when tightening the clamps

Mine are from TriCor England. But I know that Stateside suppliers sell their stuff.
 
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