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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I may need some advice and possible modifications info. Finally, after all these years my childhood dream of owning and riding a triumph come true, however, I'm a little worried my '14 Triumph T100 might be too much for me to handle. Granted I'm very new at riding, and what riding I've done was on a very different bike. Right now, I'm got good ground contact with the balls of my feet, but can't go flat footed. From what I understand this is a non-issue for most confident riders, which I'm not there yet. I'm going to take it slow, start back at ground zero going through getting a feel for the bike as if it's my 1st day in the MSF class. If I can't get a handle on my comfort with this, is there any recommendations for lowering a 2014 Bonneville? I'm sure it changes the feel of the bike ride as well, but does converting the bike with a bobber kit change the seat height measurement?

Thank you!
 

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Hello, I may need some advice and possible modifications info. Finally, after all these years my childhood dream of owning and riding a triumph come true, however, I'm a little worried my '14 Triumph T100 might be too much for me to handle. Granted I'm very new at riding, and what riding I've done was on a very different bike. Right now, I'm got good ground contact with the balls of my feet, but can't go flat footed. From what I understand this is a non-issue for most confident riders, which I'm not there yet. I'm going to take it slow, start back at ground zero going through getting a feel for the bike as if it's my 1st day in the MSF class. If I can't get a handle on my comfort with this, is there any recommendations for lowering a 2014 Bonneville? I'm sure it changes the feel of the bike ride as well, but does converting the bike with a bobber kit change the seat height measurement?

Thank you!
I'm short, just under 5"4 and don't touch the ground with anything more then tip toes, and sometimes even only one side touches and the other foot just dangles. Learning a few tricks to stopping and feeling comfortable with the bike can help a lot. I personally don't like the feel of lowered bikes.

Stopping, parking straight and looking for dips, depressions and uneven ground can really help. And then I find that putting one foot flat on the ground gives me more confidence then tippy toes of both feet. When I come to a stop I usually put my left foot fully to the ground and I kind of turn my hips INTO the bike. This gives me more leverage and strength in holding the bike upright then if my hips aren't pointed in. The extra confidence I have with holding the bike up like that is huge and once you get more familiar with the bike and your own riding then it shouldn't be as big of an issue.

I hope that helps! Good luck! :grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you, Misti, this helps a great deal. I got real nervous that I got into something I couldn't work with, especially since this has been a life long dream of mine. So I felt very heart broken when I dropped my brand new bike twice with just unloading it from the trailer and getting it into the driveway. Luckily, no real damage to the bike, just my heart. Not a scratch on the baby, just needs a new Clutch lever. Maybe I should order some extras, just in case. ����✌
 

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There are several things you can do to lower the bike, but imo don't do the bobber thing. If you don't have real motorcycle boots, the adventure style or street boots often have a thick sole and you can pick up 1/2-3/4", and be better protected. Slide your fork tubes up through the triples 1/2" or so. Note this also causes a little quicker turn in, but it won't really affect you as you're not used to the bike yet anyway. A lower seat, many times you can pick up 1" or so with little loss of comfort. Shorter rear shocks can pick up an inch, though you're losing precious shock travel, a better quality shock will make the bike feel more stable and return the chassis geometry if you also slid the fork tubes up. When you replace the tires, look for a lower profile tire. They are not all the same. As you can see , if you do all the things I've mentioned you can make the seat height as much as 3" lower and still ride much better than a bobber. The boots and seat require no mechanical knowledge. The tires are a maintenance item. Sliding the fork tubes up is free. The seat and shocks are costly but worth it, as you could easily do more damage with one drop than all these things together would cost.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Duc,

Fantastic info, thank you. I think I can get used to the tricks and trades of being a short person on a bike, but I want to not just be okay, but feel at home my the bike. Exactly, one drop could be costly. I was very lucky so far. Truth is I'm still nervous about it. It may take time, and money, but I'd like to look into some of the modifications you recommend. I'm only 5'3"...if my posture and stand like I'm stretching myself. Thanks guys! ✌
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Update, in case others out there are looking for options as a short rider. The girl at the local Triumph dealership recommend these boots to me. They arrived today, and it's like night and day. I went from somewhere in between tip toe and slightly balls of feet to almost full flat footed with zero modifications to the bike. The boots cost a good chunk of dollar bills, but very comfortable and well made quality boots. Only thing is they are very stuff in the ankle which will require practice getting around to gear shift. I actually don't feel safe riding my cruiser with these boots because of the foot controls being so far in front, and the lack of flex in the ankle. They are more of a foot under you or behind you boot. Here is the link, and hope this helps other short riders out there who want the security of having there feet planted. https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/daytona-lady-star-gtx-boots
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Another Update; so.....I took my T100 SE in for the 500 mike break in service. I ended up riding home on a Triumph Bobber. Er, so I switched the seat on the T100 to a beautiful low profile from British Customs. That got me on the T100 and out of the driveway. The boots were to stiff and didn’t make enough difference so they were returned. The boots keep you from being able to shift well as the ankle is way to inflexible. I took additional motorcycle classes using the T100, and I ride her fine. She is so beautiful, but couldn’t get myself to feel safe enough on the taller bike, I did the research for lowering I wasn’t comfortable with that either. Anyway, I test rode the Bobber and she felt like home. So now she is home with me. :)
 

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Fear not Annora , you're better off than you think. A rider your size fits a bike much more naturally than someone like me, at 6 ft 1 in. I almost look too big to be sitting on a modern classic. A shorter person fits a British size bike like a jockey on a thorobred horse - it just works.
Look up the history of many of the great GP racers, most of those guys were of modest stature, and around 150 lb. or so.

As to getting experience on your bike. Practice all you can AWAY from traffic, go where you are alone so you can focus on what you are doing without distraction. After decades of riding I still practice and swoop around in school parking lots on Sundays, this really helps with a new bike - learning its natural balance with you as the rider.

Boots are a mandatory item. Never ride without them, ever. My bike weighs close to 500 lbs. and almost went over to the left while I was just dabbing around in my driveway. Shot my left foot out and that grip sole stuck on the blacktop and kept me from going over.
Priceless! My regular boots (waterproof) are made by TCX, Italian, and made just for motorcyclists. I can wear them all day too.

A year from now, if you put in enough time learning your bike, you will be at a confidence level that will allow more and more enjoyment of our sport on two wheels. Just stay outta that traffic, its worse than ever.

Weedie

"Don't let the bastards wear you down" right?
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Yeah, Weedie, I totally agree with you. I do wear boots, the boots mentioned above are specifically designed to give extra height to a short rider. However, the stiffness and bulk of them made for very clumsy attempts at shifting. I tried to stick it out with the T100, and yeah, eventually I?d have gotten more comfortable, but in the end it didn?t feel right to me. The Bobber immediate felt like home. That is what is most important. Each rider has their own level of comfort to what they ride or don?t ride. I played the debate in my head about getting more miles, and getting more comfort, more classes. The irony was I rode the bike smooth and clean, but with feelings of fear. I took her in for the 1st 500 service and ended up just terrified of the rush hour traffic to get her back home. So, I took the Bobber home instead and it felt great. I found my home. The T100, I still have a great deal and love and respect for that bike, and you are right, eventually I?d have overcome the fear of her. Still, just simply didn?t feel like a good fit for me. Thank you all for your support, and encouragements. I hope the thread helps others decide what is best for them. We always overcome, sometimes that means sticking out that road, other times it means, choosing another road, as long as we get there.
and no never let those Bastards grind you Down...
 

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Good Move

Another Update; so.....I took my T100 SE in for the 500 mike break in service. I ended up riding home on a Triumph Bobber. Er, so I switched the seat on the T100 to a beautiful low profile from British Customs. That got me on the T100 and out of the driveway. The boots were to stiff and didn’t make enough difference so they were returned. The boots keep you from being able to shift well as the ankle is way to inflexible. I took additional motorcycle classes using the T100, and I ride her fine. She is so beautiful, but couldn’t get myself to feel safe enough on the taller bike, I did the research for lowering I wasn’t comfortable with that either. Anyway, I test rode the Bobber and she felt like home. So now she is home with me. :)
Who said "If the shoe fits - wear it" ?? The Bobber felt right and you married it - that's a good move. I remember having about four different bars on one of my T100's long time ago, and ended up with the stockers anyway.
Feeling a comfort level on a new bike is way important - it will just get better with more saddle time.
So, Annora, Enjoy! and ................stay outta the traffic as best you can (take the long road home):laugh2:

Weedie
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Weedie, so true. And I wish, Er, I live outside of Washington DC, there is no such thing as staying out of traffic, unfortunately.
 

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Hi, I'm 5'5" on a 2001 Bonneville with nothing adjust and wearing regular boots. I'm basically always on toes unless i simply stand leaning the bike to the left or right on one foot. I agree with others--practice in the lot, pretend you're making tight right angle turns.

Take time in live traffic to master right and left turns. The biking courses that stress "looking through the turn" are dead on correct. Practice this in a school lot or church lot often and then when real life turns are to happen , don't dart out. Never worry about the impatient person behind you in a car........

Being short isn't a buzzkill for a bonneville. Yes it would be better to touch flat but all the bike adjustments will change performance a bit. I've tried lowering shocks and it helps a bit but it also changes the ride and my city is rife with potholes.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hello, and welcome. It’s funny, now that I have the confidence on the Bobber, I feel as thought the T100 isn’t so scary anymore. Still, I’ve always loved the Bobber, I fell in love with it at first sight. Either way, she feels like home to me. Down the road, I would really want to add another traditional cafe racer Bonnivileyto my collection. Enjoy!
 

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I was on a 50cc Honda C110 for year--actually a great city bike--Beatles rode them, Elvis, Beach Boys. It was a 4 speed with clutch and got me riding around Boston --loads of kick starts. When I lept up to the 790cc Bonneville, the new awareness of staying still and keeping the bike level hit home. Easy to lose control of the weight, especially when shorter.....so constant consciousness helps me...reminding myself over and over, focus, be safe , focus--mind what i'm doing.

Best,
moi
 

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Hello, and welcome. It’s funny, now that I have the confidence on the Bobber, I feel as thought the T100 isn’t so scary anymore. Still, I’ve always loved the Bobber, I fell in love with it at first sight. Either way, she feels like home to me. Down the road, I would really want to add another traditional cafe racer Bonnivileyto my collection. Enjoy!

It's amazing what a little riding confidence will do :) Glad you feel better and enjoy the Bobber! One option you can sometimes get away with for shorter riders is trimming down the thickness of the seat. I've done this on my Yamaha YZ250 as it gets me a little closer to being able to touch the ground without changing any suspension settings etc.

I also find that just putting one foot down and then turning my hips INTO the bike helps my confidence level as well because I have a bit more strength and leverage to hold the bike up. :nerd:
 
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