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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Alright,

My '06 Thruxton came today. I bought it from Gengras [in CT], after hearing/reading some good stuff about them. My MSF course is this coming weekend - I hope to pass - even if I flunk I am going to spend a lot of time in a parking lot. Just FYI, I am 5' 4" - 140lbs - athletic body - 31 yrs old with 31" inseam, so both my feet should touch at least 80% on both the sides and I am hoping that this should help me get used to the 500lbs machine.

My first impression was that the bike felt heavy but only when I had to walk it & I can't make the steering lock work - need some help from a wise guy :)

As you can see I am not too young and I am in full senses regarding what not to do with the bike, I am [almost] mature and sensible - so I shall be taking it easy and learning the art of motorcycling and I don't want to rush into this. I know what drills I shall be practicing in the first month, but if someone wants to forward any other resources, I shall be grateful. I know for sure [but hope I don't] I shall be laying down my bike couple of times while practicing, what is the best upgrade I can make to protect the body work - I don't want to do any performance upgrade for first 8-9 months, nor do I want to add more weight to the bike - just curious what would be the best investment to protect a really gorgeous bike other than riding responsibly ?

Can't thank you all enough
D
 

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I think the chances of you laying the bike down in the first 2 months are pretty slight, actually.

The MSF course (which 99% of people pass) will go a very long way.

Read Proficient Motorcycling by Hough, too, which will provide some explanation for the things they teach you in the course, like keeping on throttle during a swerve.

Good luck and give us a pic with you and the bike in the intro thread.
 

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I think the chances of you laying the bike down in the first 2 months are pretty slight, actually.
Ditto.
I was in the same situation as you back in October. Zero experience on a motorcycle but real enthusiastic about safety and having a good time. So far, no spills on my 2008 Thrux...yes, slip and slide here and there (one, thanks to an orange pulp truck spilling rotten slimy orange juice all over the road...this IS Florida) but overall an awesome experience. I'm 5'9" with a 30 inseam and can put both feet on the ground but I've read on here somewhere with a picture (can't find the link though) that someone shaved down the original, factory seat and then recovered it with the same material, giving them more inseam space to put down their feet.
Try this thread and also use the search function:
http://www.triumphrat.net/club-cafe/78485-short-people-on-thrux.html

Good Luck!
 

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Hi dhisharp
Remember that you have to ride like you are totally invisible to everyone.
I recently had a spill on my 07 Thruxton. Luckily i was only going around 40 to 45, which is fast enough to hit the pavement.
It was a very typical left turn right in my path. I was just about to pass a junction when this 18 year old kid (with 2 suspensions) dedcided to shoot straight out in front of me. I was probably no more than 15 to 20 feet from the side of his truck. My front wheel washed out under the heavy braking and i went down on my head and shoulder. Seperating the shoulder and tearing all the ligiments.
All i remember is thinking, s*%$# that's my lovely bike I can hear sliding down the road!!!
We are so invisible to others. I would say keep the speed down, good lane position, cover the brakes and you should be fine.
There are a lot of good books out there one i especially like is Total Control, by Lee Parks.
Lot's of great info.
Also another reason to ride slower is so you check out you and your bike in the shop windows as you cruise by, and think to yourself this is one f#%@!*^ cool bike!!!
Have fun Ride safe
John.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I feel stupid

I just laid it down doing a tight turn in a closed garage ... can't believe it ... it didn't fall very bad but the end of clutch lever is broken and the gear selector shaft bent.

I think the bike was in 1st gear when it went down and now I can't bring it back in Neutral and I can't even start the bike ... fall wasn't bad so I am hoping there won't be any major internal damage.

I am in berkeley - I am going to call few shops tomorrow, who can work on triumph ...

I am not sure if someone would be able to come to my apt garage because bike is not starting ... should I buy the clutch lever and gear selector shaft myself from bikebandit and replace it myself ? Is that easy enough to replace it for a newbie ? Please help ...

I screwed it up on the very first day :(
 

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Welcome to the wonderful world of Triumph and its coolest bike: The Thruxton. Good luck w/ it and the more you ride, the more confidence you'll get.

BTW, did they ship the bike from CT to CA? You must have the yellow thruxton they had listed.

Dave-
 

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I am a first time owner and street rider. I began my journey last April and took a spill over some gravel (second day on the bike) while making a left hand turn. I got torn up but the bike got it worse. The clutch lever was bent, mirror broken off, Left foot peg and shifter gone. The parts seem pretty fragile so maybe investing in a couple of replacement sets might be worth while and they are easy to replace.

As for riding an oldtimer who I spoke with sometime after my mishap gave me one great word of advise that has saved my neck a few times. He told me to NEVER under ANY circumstances be the first one through an intersection when the lights are changing. This has been the absolute best peice of advise anyone has ever given me.

Be safe and have fun.

Randy
 

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Stayin' Safe - Larry Grodsky

dhisharp,

In addition to David Hough's "Proficient" series, I highly recommend Larry Grodsky's "Stayin' Safe" (Whitehorse Press) - a collection of his columns from Motorcycle Consumer News. An excellent collection of safety tips and drills to help with your survival on 2 wheels. And hopefully this will be your last drop!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
dhisharp,

In addition to David Hough's "Proficient" series, I highly recommend Larry Grodsky's "Stayin' Safe" (Whitehorse Press) - a collection of his columns from Motorcycle Consumer News. An excellent collection of safety tips and drills to help with your survival on 2 wheels. And hopefully this will be your last drop!
Yes I have Hough's book - very good book indeed, but right now I am just focusing on getting used to the bike, have to spend a lot of time in parking lot
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Welcome to the wonderful world of Triumph and its coolest bike: The Thruxton. Good luck w/ it and the more you ride, the more confidence you'll get.

BTW, did they ship the bike from CT to CA? You must have the yellow thruxton they had listed.

Dave-
Yes I shipped it from CT to CA - it's the yellow one - very sweet looking
 

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Sorry about the spill. Happens to best.

Those fixes are easy. Before you go ordering new parts, first take off the shifter and try to bend it back to its original shape. And when you're trying to find neutral, rock the bike back and forth a bit and it should slip into N. No need to pull in the clutch.

As for the clutch lever, what's broken? Did the ball-end snap off? Did it break at the pivot point? Close-up pics would help a lot.
 

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Well apart from the obvious ( reading books, MSF course) I would suggest just sitting on the bike in the garage, and getting familiar with the controlsthe layout , and the feel of the bike at rest, etc. Nothing wrong with just looking at it and memorizing its layout or just sitting on it. ANytime spent with the bike is good when you are new.
 

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Greaser's suggestion is an excellent one. Pay particular attention to the fuel on/reserve/off switch. You don't want to be trying to find it the first time, as you're driving along at 60 MPH in heavy traffic, and your engine starts to sputter! (Don't ask me how I know this *G*)
 

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Welcome to the wonderful world of Triumph

Congratulations on your new bike and hobby! Since you mentioned the bike being a bit tall I would suggest getting some 13 inch shocks for you to lower it a bit. Pick up an inexpensive set cheap off ebay OR I would recommend if you can afford it get WORKS Performance shocks in a 13 inch and what ever your weight is they will build you a very nice set for around $400.00 and they are the best...but lowering it will help you I believe. The stock shocks on your bike are 14.5 inches. The standard Bonneville uses a 13" shock also so there are alot of cheap prices out there on those as well. The advice on riding like you are invisable will keep you out of trouble. I've been riding 40+ years. I never get tired of the fun motorcycles are for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Congratulations on your new bike and hobby! Since you mentioned the bike being a bit tall I would suggest getting some 13 inch shocks for you to lower it a bit. Pick up an inexpensive set cheap off ebay OR I would recommend if you can afford it get WORKS Performance shocks in a 13 inch and what ever your weight is they will build you a very nice set for around $400.00 and they are the best...but lowering it will help you I believe. The stock shocks on your bike are 14.5 inches. The standard Bonneville uses a 13" shock also so there are alot of cheap prices out there on those as well. The advice on riding like you are invisable will keep you out of trouble. I've been riding 40+ years. I never get tired of the fun motorcycles are for me.
50% of both of my feet touch on the ground. My one major concern is doing tighter turns at slower speeds. Like a fool I was trying to make a U turn in 20' space on my very first day. Do you think installing lower shocks [13"] would provide me better control of the bike on slower speed or boost my confidence ?

I guess that should also lower the CG of the bike, because it feels very top heavy with a full tank.
 

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If you lower the rear, you'll want to lower the front to maintain the bike's overall geometry.

If you replace 14.5-inch rear shocks with 13-inch units, then you need to raise the fork tubes in the trees by 1.5 inches.

It's not hard. Put the bike on a lift, take off the front wheel, loosen the pinch bolts on the top and bottom yokes and push each fork leg up. Retorque the pinch bolts, replace the front wheel, voila[/i[]. There's a little more to it, but that's the general process. Something to think about...
 
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