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Discussion Starter #1
A post to say hi as I have just joined and also today bought a 98 TBird. I pick it up on Friday and from all test rides and looks is immaculate. :)
This was a big thing for me, for the last 10 years I have been riding and maintaining a 79 T140 Bonneville. It has been a great bike and will be sad day when I sell it (soon):(
This looks the best forum to read and learn about this bike as there is nothing like owners views and experience. I am not a frequent chatter but will be reading everything I can and posting on the Tbird topics. I have been procrastinating for the last 5 years about this bike. I have looked at so many options for a better suited medium cruiser for longer tours and always came back to looking at the TBird. Its the looks that get me. A total bonus the reviews always read well also.
I like to do as much as I can myself but have no experience with this bike whatsoever.:confused:
The first job will be new chain and sprockets and my first query is.
How difficult is it to get at the front drive sprocket ?
I am assuming it worth changing both sprockets and chain together. This bike has 22,000 k's on it and never had a new chain. The loose play over the rear sprocket shows the wear.
regards
Murray from OZZY
PS I will post some pics as soon as get some decent ones.
 

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G'day & welcome! Fine choice of machine...:D

For the front sprocket cover you'll need a gasket for this & a clutch pushrod oil seal would be good to have on hand. The push rod can also be reversed to provide a fresh surface for this seal if you consider it needed. If the bike's leaned over on the sidestand, quite a bit of oil can leak out. The front sprocket is highly torqued & uses a tab washer. You want to keep the old chain on until you loosen this as holding it from moving is tricky. An air impact wrench (or 12V wheel nut impact wrench) would be ideal... I'm a tightwad & don't fit a new tab washer unless it's totally fekked (Irish technical term :)). Some folks like to have a new gearchange shaft oil seal handy too....I've never bothered, just use care sliding the cover over the splines.

Haynes do a manual for these - well worth it imo.
Bikebandit.com have the fiche blow-up parts diagrams, very useful too. They don't show Triumph factory part #s tho' I have a factory Tbird fiche as do others here if you need help there.

Changing sprockets gives you the chance to change the gearing. IMO these bikes are way undergeared tho' there's a bit of compromise to be considered for a high-ish !st gear & more relaxed top gear cruising on the five speeders. 17t/43t is stock. I'm running 19t/42t on my Legend, same as I did on my previous 98 Tbird. For full disclosure I mostly ride solo, out of town & have a few carb/ exhaust mods.

Maintenance is very easy on these imo. Even valve shimming I found easy, but ditched the ridiculously fiddly shim removal tool if favour of just lifting the camshafts. I use a torque wrench to get everything nice & even bolting up.

Search around the site - you'll find most every advice you need here.

Cheers
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Mike, reassuring advise. I will get the seals etc as I am getting the sprocket set and new chain in the deal.
I will stay with standard sprocket ratio as I am a big bloke and often have a pillion.
Pretty good on mechanics and have good tools , torque wrenches etc.
so you have got me started thinking about modern machines other than the 30 year old and older bikes I have always worked on.
Looking forwards to getting to know this bike.

Yes I will get a decent manual and have had a look at the Bikebandit site.

Here;s a flicker link to some pic's of the new TBird and my old beauty T140 ( now for sale in OZ )
I will get some decent pics of the new machine on the weekend.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
 
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