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I just found this site a few days ago and am very impressed with the amount of things topics and things to learn about the Tiger. I am so happy to have found a group of people who can help if i have a question

I have a 2000 model that i bought just before last Christmas with less than 2000 miles on the clock. it has over 10,000 on it now.

Since then i have made one or two small modifications. First i fitted a larger gearbox sprocket ( i commute on the I 5 freeway about 25 miles each way) from thunder cycle in NZ and this dropped the rpm by about 500.

Iadded a Triumph tank bag and top trunk and some aluminum side boxes from a company in Iowa, the name escapes me now, which i fit on for camping trips.
Heated grips came with the bike but i did invest in an electric vest which has been great this past few weeks, believe it or not it does get cold in southern California, specially early in the mornings.

My first question is regarding the Scottoiler i recieved earlier this year as a gift. It has a universal fitting but can't seem to figure out how to fit it up to the tiger. is there something i am missing or is there a special trick to making it fit.'?

My second question is about replacement tires. My riding is about 95% srtreet and a bit of dirt roads at the wekend. What is the brand and style of chioce amongst the group.

Many thanks in advance.

Chef
 

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I also have a Scott Oiler (standard 50ml size and single nozzle). No issues installing on my 2000. I installed the reservoir on the right side of the bike on the frame-tube with the supplied plastic "saddle" and "zip-ties". You will need the "special" tee from Scott to attach the vacuum line to the bike's system (it's not in the kit, but they will supply for free). I attached the delivery tube and nozzle using "zip-ties" and some of the plastic tubing holder material found in the kit. The biggest issue was routing over the swing-arm (make sure the tube won't get pinched as the arm travels.

I hope this makes it a little clearer!

I bought Dunlop D607's . They are a little less "blocky" than the standard Anakees, the bike handles better (on pavement, I don't go off-road) and they seem to be wearing a little better. One other favorable point is that they are about 30% cheaper (at least in the states). :)

[ This message was edited by: guydan on 2006-12-08 19:29 ]
 

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Tires - I have worn through two rear Annakees. Got 5000 on each. I have now fitted Tourances, hoping to get longer use from them. Like them so far, and find them good on dirt.
 

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Scotoiler - I would think twice about fitting this. I bought my bike secondhand so it came with a Scotoiler. This was my first experience of one having lubed the chain by hand on previous chain drive bikes.

I have found it very difficult to set the flow. It seems to be not enough or to be all over the back wheel and tyre. If you are not going to drive off road then a few minutes at night with a can of chain lube IMO might be better.

With regard to the tyres I also only ride on the black stuff so went for Michelin Pilot Roads. Absolutely spot on! Brilliant :-D

Paul
 
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Thanks very much for the help. I didn,t think of mounting the oiler on the right side. I'll take another look at it when i get home from work tonight.

Also thanks for the answers regarding tires.

Chef
 

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On 2006-12-09 01:58, Pansmiker wrote:

With regard to the tyres I also only ride on the black stuff so went for Michelin Pilot Roads. Absolutely spot on! Brilliant :-D

Paul
I totally agree with the Michelin Pilot Roads, I just put them on my Tiger and what a difference!
 

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Hi

I run a Scottoiler on my 05.

Once set I find it brilliant. You just need to play with the settings a little.

Oh and Ive only adjusted the chain once in 18 months and never need to worry about the chain. :hammer:
 

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Have you checked out the forum 'Album' at the top of the page, there are a few pictures of different chain oilers mounted up on our bikes.

With the Scottoiler, make sure you get a good seal on the vacuum pipes and all should be well. I have found my Scottoiler to be 100% reliable in all conditions, even at altitude (which can play havoc with some oilers)
 

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I got my Scottoiler about 18 months ago and installed it without much hassle. I actually rivited a channel on the inside of the swingarm to guide and protect the feed tube. I found it interesting that my directions said to direct the feed tube on the center of the chain directly in front of the rear sprocket. This was somewhat of a pain because the chain would grab the small dripper tube and rip it out of the larger feed tube. I run my chain pretty loose, the chain and I both like it that way! I recently saw some other Scottoiler info that had the small distribution tube running on the outside edge of the rear sprocket. I changed mine to that configuration and it's a vast improvement. Not so much slinging, it evenly lubes the chain, even if it looks like it's pointed at only one side - I think there's plenty of action when the Tiger's eating up pavement - the tube's not been ripped out since I did that, and the setting at about "3" seems to work on hot and cold days. Yes, we get cold in Arizona, too. I run Tourance tires and am on my second front, third rear. I like'um a lot! I also run a 19T that I got from Baxter Cycle in Iowa. The distances we need to cover out here in the west make those 500 extra revs well worth it!
 
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