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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2000 Adventurer with 21,000 miles...my chain is shot. It keeps stretching. Anyway, I am wondering what chain to put on...O-ring or X-ring. I want a X-ring..
what do you all think about this:
http://www.quality-cycle.com/truth_about_motorcycle_chains.htm

The only shop around here who works on Triumphs wants to sell me a Tsubaki 530 o-ring($109 nice discount), and front sprocket ($30) rear ($50) about.
I can have the nearest Triumph dealer ship me a OEM chain and sprocket kit for $220...but I started to try and get to the front sprocket and it scared me. There's a coolant valve assembly thingy going through the front chain guard, seems like it has a seal. Also when I popped all the screws, engine oil dripped out the bottom, so its like you have to drain oil and coolant to change the front sprocket.
Screw that, I'll let the cycle shop do it. Except he wont use carry in parts.
Advice?
 

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That thing on the front sprocket cover is the clutch slave cylinder. IIRC it will not be disturbed by removing the cover. There is oil behind the sprocket cover- a throwback to the bikes that had a dip-stick in the top of the cover. You might want to lean the bike over to the right to minimise oil loss.

It might be a good idea to have a new gasket to hand, although when I changed mine I got away with using the old gasket with some sealant.
 

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You don't have to drain the coolant, just the oil to do the job. Not a big deal. I haven't changed my chain and sprockets yet, so can't say on Triumph OEM versus Tsubaki, but I do have a Tsubaki on another bike and it is fine. Other posts have noted no problems with the aftermarket sprockets though they don't have the damping rubber of the OEM. I pulled the front sprocket cover to replace a broken shifter shaft and it is an easy job, but you will probably need a new gasket. HTH
Joe
 

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Chain/sprocket removal

You don't have to drain the coolant, just the oil to do the job. Not a big deal. I haven't changed my chain and sprockets yet, so can't say on Triumph OEM versus Tsubaki, but I do have a Tsubaki on another bike and it is fine. Other posts have noted no problems with the aftermarket sprockets though they don't have the damping rubber of the OEM. I pulled the front sprocket cover to replace a broken shifter shaft and it is an easy job, but you will probably need a new gasket. HTH
Joe
You will only lose a little oil as you remove the cover. Place a block under the side stand to straighten the bike up towards vertical. The gasket on the cover is small and easily made if you find it damaged.
Once you have knocked up the tab washer and with 1st gear selected have an assistant apply the rear brake place a 36mm socket on the nut along with a good sized shifter and remove the nut.
Rear wheel sprocket replacement is a case of removing the wheel and then the sprocket securing nuts.
Once both sprockets are back on the chain adjusters should be screwed out until the axle is as far forward as it will go.
The chain will come with a joining link. Some use a special tool to join the chain. In lieu of that have your assistant place a solid steel bar through the spokes from the right side of the wheel. The end of the bar is then placed up against the back of the joining link, assemble the link correctly from your side and then use a small ball peined hammer to carefully 'mushroom' the soft heads of the joining link. The steel bar at the rear of the link acts as a dolly and it is possible to obtain a neat mushroom pattern without splitting the soft metal.

Good Luck.
 

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Another suggestion – You’ll probably want to change the rubber chain guide when you replace the chain. It’s attached with a torx bolt that is hidden behind a frame member. You won’t be able to get a socket in to remove it. What you can do is carefully cut the old guide with a sharp wood chisel, then remove the bolt with needle nose vise grips. Replace the bolt with a hex head that you can get an open end wrench on.
 
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