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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a 1972 Triumph Trophy 650 with a vin number of: AG44190 Do any of you know what this bike actually is? I always thought that the Trophy was a 500cc bike. This one came without a tachometer (so I bought one on ebay to install) and the owner tells me it has one carb rather than the two that the Bonnie has. This same month I have also bought another Triumph (Bonnie 1971 650) vin number: XE07156. And a Norton 750 1967 n15. So I warn you all.... I am gonna have a ship load of stupid questions.......

Regarding the Trophy bike.... If I add a tachometer to it, do I need a tach drive? Is there one already in the case, even if it came without a tach from the factory? As you might guess the bikes are in transit, and I do not have them here to view....

[email protected]....
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks

Thanks for the heads up regarding a tach drive. I'll start scouring ebay to see what can be found....

I think I have an interested buyer for my Norton N15 .... Hard decision.... keep the Norton sell the Norton... hmmmm Keep both Triumphs.. sell one.... Hmmmm Keep the old Honda...

I know... Ill buy a couple more.....

Mike....:D
 

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Discussion Starter #5
re thanks

First off, a definition of the quality of a used bike is in order. This is my measure......

The 67 Norton N15 is a high 8. Needs new tires... and that's it. Fresh overhaul fresh paint.... 13 k miles on it. 50 miles on the overhaul. Offer to date is 7 k. I don't know if I want to sell... Starts first-second kick.... I really like Triumph bikes... but admittedly there are lots of them around. The Norton is a bit more rarefied and you don't "see yourself" at an intersection very often. And its a conversation generator at any Brit bike runs....


10 There is no such thing as a vehicle with a 10 rating…. (new ones might get a 10 but….)

9 Excellent looking and functioning bike. All items and accessories work as new and looks new. Shows a dozen thousand miles or less. Runs well, starts easily. Bikes in this criteria are either fastidiously maintained, or are museum pieces.

8 Nice looking bike. Not perfect but a nice rider. Numbers should match, and bike should show minimal amounts of wear. All accessories and controls should work

7 Working bike runs well shows a bit of age. A few rust spots, needs a few things fixed to become a number 8-9. Rips in upholstery in this category

6 A ratty bike. Runs but has a few major problems. Needs a bit of TLC to get into number 7-8 condition. Has some rust

5 A bike that has value enough to repair as it might be somewhat rare. Otherwise is a contender for a parts bike

4 3 2 1 Parts bikes unless extremely rare.
 

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1972 tiger

I have aquired a 1972 650 tiger .It has taller handlebars than most tigers i have seen.But i still beleive they are stock because the cables have not been altered or replaced.this bike has about 6 thousand miles on it.I was wondering if any body knew anything about this but i have heard that they offered a street model and a off road model or enduro type of tigers.and yes i would maybe consider trading or selling this bike.
 

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The bikes imported to the US all got taller handlebars. OCCASIONALLY, there were some taller-than-average bars installed that could still use the stock cables. It was all a matter of what they had in stock when the bike reached that point in the assembly line.

As far as "street" and "off road", that would be TR6R (Road), and TR6C (Competition). Upswept pipes and different gearing is about the only difference between the C & R models, and while off road riding was possible, competition use required serious stripping down.
 

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Mike, I believe that the tach drive thread is a l.h. one. There is probably a bolt, a.k.a. "blanking plug", in the crankcase now. Check the thread to be sure....a manual or parts book will tell you.

Just in case you didn't know: Jim
 

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Hi Mike,

You should be able to look at the frame and see if it's a TR6R or a TR6C

I believe in 1972, Triumph made 3 650 Bikes:

• Trophy TR6C - 650CC, 'C' designates competition model. As GrandPaul Z states, no Tach, 18T front sprocket instead of 19T (for more low end torque), high left side exhaust pipes and a shield mounted on the frame under the engine. One Carb for simplicity.

• Tiger TR6R - 650CC, 'R' for road model. Same as TR6C but 19T front sprocket. Has a Tach. Low exhaust pipes on both sides of the bike.

• Bonneville T120 R - 650CC. Same bike as above, but the flagship Bonneville. Tach, two carbs 19T Front Sprocket.

http://www.classicbike.biz/Triumph/Brochures/1970/72TriumphBrochure.pdf

I own a 1972 TR6C Trophy. KG34450. Apparently only about 1150 were made in 72. Most I've looked up on the internet have been chopped or bobbed. Hope yours is still in 'original-ish' shape. Not many of my bikes brothers and sisters left out there. :)

Many people tend to not like the OIF bikes. I love mine. The OIF gets an unusually bad rap but the industry at the time found them to be better handling than their predecessors due to the race inspired frame, race inspired front shocks and reportedly some of the best drum brakes ever put on a Triumph.

That said, my dream Triumph is a 67 TR6C, or a 70 Bonneville (or a green TR6C) or a 64 Bonnie, but I'd love to have a pre-unit too. A 50's T-Bird would be cool too. And those nacelles on the 50s Triumphs were sweet. And a Daytona 500 would be FUN... Guess I love all Triumphs. :)

The seats are a bit higher on these OIF bikes. I've seen pictures of OIFs with 'shorter' seats, but can't seem to find them. That's the only thing I'd change on my bike just so I could 'flat foot' it a little easier when at lights and during kickstarting.

Any pictures? Here's a couple of mine:

http://gallery.me.com/sballinger#100146
 

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The seat height of the first OIF frames in '71 was way high at 34". In '72 Triumph first addressed the problem by removing padding from the seat and narrowing it at the front. They shortened the fork springs to lower the front end. (A shorter centerstand was also fitted.) Seat height was reduced to 32 1/2". At #CG50414 a new frame was introduced with the rear subframe nearly3 1/2" lower on the frame. Everything on the back end of the bike except the swingarm and rear wheel was changed to accommodate the lower subframe.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I only have the pics that I originally looked at: But if I can figure out how to post em here, I can do so. I have a 1971 Bonnie XE07156, And a 1972 Trophy AG44190. Also picked up a 1967 Norton G15. No pics yet of the Norton. All the bikes have yet to be imported into Canada. I will do so in March. Till then they are tucked away in Bellingham WA. (Bellingham is the first significant city in proximity to me here in Vancouver BC.)

The two Triumphs have been reported to me as a high 7 or low 8 on my scale of "cleanliness". The Norton is a 8. I think I will probably sell one of the Triumphs but that would be in a a year or two. Till then I plan to try and meet up with the British bike clubbers here in BC, and go for a few rides.....

If any one is ever in Vancouver.... I have three Brit bikes you can ride.... Take yer pick..... I also have a 1981 CM400 commuter Honda.

In regards to the seat height.... I am looking to find an inexpensive solo seat. Hoping of course that I might be able to lower the stance... Has anyone got a good inexpensive solo seat and the mounting hardware? I don't want to do any cut/welding.....


Hi Mike,

You should be able to look at the frame and see if it's a TR6R or a TR6C

I believe in 1972, Triumph made 3 650 Bikes:

• Trophy TR6C - 650CC, 'C' designates competition model. As GrandPaul Z states, no Tach, 18T front sprocket instead of 19T (for more low end torque), high left side exhaust pipes and a shield mounted on the frame under the engine. One Carb for simplicity.

• Tiger TR6R - 650CC, 'R' for road model. Same as TR6C but 19T front sprocket. Has a Tach. Low exhaust pipes on both sides of the bike.

• Bonneville T120 R - 650CC. Same bike as above, but the flagship Bonneville. Tach, two carbs 19T Front Sprocket.

http://www.classicbike.biz/Triumph/Brochures/1970/72TriumphBrochure.pdf

I own a 1972 TR6C Trophy. KG34450. Apparently only about 1150 were made in 72. Most I've looked up on the internet have been chopped or bobbed. Hope yours is still in 'original-ish' shape. Not many of my bikes brothers and sisters left out there. :)

Many people tend to not like the OIF bikes. I love mine. The OIF gets an unusually bad rap but the industry at the time found them to be better handling than their predecessors due to the race inspired frame, race inspired front shocks and reportedly some of the best drum brakes ever put on a Triumph.

That said, my dream Triumph is a 67 TR6C, or a 70 Bonneville (or a green TR6C) or a 64 Bonnie, but I'd love to have a pre-unit too. A 50's T-Bird would be cool too. And those nacelles on the 50s Triumphs were sweet. And a Daytona 500 would be FUN... Guess I love all Triumphs. :)

The seats are a bit higher on these OIF bikes. I've seen pictures of OIFs with 'shorter' seats, but can't seem to find them. That's the only thing I'd change on my bike just so I could 'flat foot' it a little easier when at lights and during kickstarting.

Any pictures? Here's a couple of mine:

http://gallery.me.com/sballinger#100146
 

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The seat height of the first OIF frames in '71 was way high at 34". In '72 Triumph first addressed the problem by removing padding from the seat and narrowing it at the front. The shortened the fork springs to lower the front end. (A shorter centerstand was also fitted.) Seat height was reduced to 32 1/2". At #CG50414 a new fram was introduced with the rear subframe nearly3 1/2" lower on the frame. Everything on the back end of the bike except the swingarm and rear wheel was changed to accommodate the lower subframe.

Good Post!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
pics posted

I posted all three of my bikes. the Trophy, the Bonnie, and the Norton.... I posted them in the members albums. Dunno if that's the right place.....

under member: mikestp
 

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Hi Mike,

You should be able to look at the frame and see if it's a TR6R or a TR6C

I believe in 1972, Triumph made 3 650 Bikes:

• Trophy TR6C - 650CC, 'C' designates competition model. As GrandPaul Z states, no Tach, 18T front sprocket instead of 19T (for more low end torque), high left side exhaust pipes and a shield mounted on the frame under the engine. One Carb for simplicity.

• Tiger TR6R - 650CC, 'R' for road model. Same as TR6C but 19T front sprocket. Has a Tach. Low exhaust pipes on both sides of the bike.

• Bonneville T120 R - 650CC. Same bike as above, but the flagship Bonneville. Tach, two carbs 19T Front Sprocket.

http://www.classicbike.biz/Triumph/Brochures/1970/72TriumphBrochure.pdf

I own a 1972 TR6C Trophy. KG34450. Apparently only about 1150 were made in 72. Most I've looked up on the internet have been chopped or bobbed. Hope yours is still in 'original-ish' shape. Not many of my bikes brothers and sisters left out there. :)

Many people tend to not like the OIF bikes. I love mine. The OIF gets an unusually bad rap but the industry at the time found them to be better handling than their predecessors due to the race inspired frame, race inspired front shocks and reportedly some of the best drum brakes ever put on a Triumph.

That said, my dream Triumph is a 67 TR6C, or a 70 Bonneville (or a green TR6C) or a 64 Bonnie, but I'd love to have a pre-unit too. A 50's T-Bird would be cool too. And those nacelles on the 50s Triumphs were sweet. And a Daytona 500 would be FUN... Guess I love all Triumphs. :)

The seats are a bit higher on these OIF bikes. I've seen pictures of OIFs with 'shorter' seats, but can't seem to find them. That's the only thing I'd change on my bike just so I could 'flat foot' it a little easier when at lights and during kickstarting.

Any pictures? Here's a couple of mine:

http://gallery.me.com/sballinger#100146
Hi,

I am looking to buy a 1972 Triumph Trophy 650 TR6C. I would welcome any advice as to what I should watch out for in terms of issues and problems. I understand brakes and running hot can be an issue with the 71 and later OIF bikes.

Best,

John
 

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I came across this beauty a few years ago at the international North West 200 road races in N Ireland (where I live). It was a locally registered 'bike and I just loved the look of it....in wonderful (restored??) condition with a tacho added. I thought it was just bloody gorgeous!!





I hung around for 1/2 hour or so hoping the owner would show but he didn't.....haven't seen it since..
 

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71-72 Triumphs

72's are a bargain due to lack of respect. I installed a Corbin Gunfighter seat to lower the height. I'm 6ft; it was never an issue. My 1st seat rotted after 35 yrs.
The lack of high performance brake shoes for conical brakes is an issue for me. The factory shoes are MUCH too hard. I put a 73 front end on mine for the disc brake and HH pads. The 72 with the 5-speed tranny is preferred, but the 4-speed is good. Transmissions came with a leaf spring to locate gears and neutral and are inferior to the plunger type. Valve lash adjustment is easier due to the enlongated cover. I have a Mikuni on my 72 TR6, with a thin pancake air filter. The clearance from the carb to the frame tube limits filter options. Make sure the brace on the bottom of the tank fastening the front/bottoms together is in place. Stress cracks are very likely when this part is omitted. Inspect the wiring harness for deterioration. Inspect all rubber parts. If they aren't new, expect to replace them. The push-in exhaust pipes can seal poorly at the head. Get good exhaust components. Brighter headlights probably require an upgrade to 3-phase alternator/regulator. Personally, I immediately get rid of the original Lucas voltage rectifier/regulation. Other than comical brake shoes, all upgrades are available including: rims,tires, spokes, progressive springs and shocks, valves, alternators, ignitions, sealed wheel bearings, viton O-rings, clutches, and cables. Parts for keeping one original are also widely available. Don't believe the shown mileage; odometer/speedometers and drives frequently had problems. Expect to pay much more for a TR6C. 1 1/2" high-level pipes can be fitted with adapters. I haven't found push-in high pipes and in 73 they went to shorter cylinders. Provenance should be a big factor in your selection. It's difficult to uncover all the modifications/fabrications/bastardizations done without an owner history. Bob
 
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