Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I'm working on the rear axle / Hub assembly on my '68 Bonneville restoration aka "bike-o-parts"...and had to order a new rear axle and bearings. Ordered them according to part numbers, etc...

The bearings slide on and off the axle and I'm guessing that's not correct. Does anyone know of a "How To" about the rear axle / Hub and Bearings assembly? Besides the bearing issue I'd like some help on how to center the axle, etc... I've tried the search function here, but not luck.

Thanks in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,034 Posts
Hi
The spindle should be a sliding close tolerance fit.
The bearing is 20mm and the spindle should be between 19.97mm and 19.98mm where it sits on the bearings.
I think it might be prudent to measure your new spindle with a micrometer, just in case it is a poorly dimensioned pattern part.

regards
Peg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks Peg...
Not confident my Harbor Freight micrometer is even worth getting out.

But on the fit - I can insert the spindle into both bearings and then freely spin the spindle and move it in and out while spinning it.
The spindle freely moves in the bearings without the bearing turning with it.

P.S. - the original spindle does the same thing...
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
52 Posts
Not a how to but a very helpful resource is the Hermit blog Hyperlink Field Guide to Bonnie. A Hyperlink Junkie's Field Guide to Bonnie

I finished mine in December, and have not really driven it yet because of snow.

I agree that it should be tighter than you are experiencing, but mine (new sealed bearings, old axle) also slid along the axle more easily than I thought they should. There was not any noticeable play in them, but they would fall off if I tilted the axle straight up. When everything is snugged up with the weight of the wheel and maybe the lateral force from the nuts, I am confident it is the bearings turning now, not the axle. I am expecting that the weight of the bike and rider also ensure the bearings turn on the axle, but I certainly think it would be possible for the axle to turn without the bearings, which would be bad. But I think it is just the design.

As far as centering the wheel, you need a thin wrench and to align it with the front wheel, using two very straight pieces of wood or something like that. It is finicky to get the placement and tension correct. Of all the things on the bike (1970 Bonneville), and I did a nut and bolt teardown, I found the rear bearings and wheel the most finicky.

Just so we are clear, I will not be sure I have it right until I get a chance to ride it in the spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Hey Thanks!
Yeah - my spindle does not have any "play" in it, but I can move it in and out fairly easily. Which sounds like what you have as well.
I've seen Hermit's blog before and it is thorough, but didn't think of it. I'll dig in to it, thanks!

I just posted a new question about the big dust cover on the short side of the Hub. I too am using the new "sealed" bearing and was wondering if I had to use that dust cover or not.
Did you use it with the new bearings??
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
52 Posts
I must have taken that rear wheel apart and put it back together 7-8 times, and adjusted the spacing and tension at least as many times. In the end, with the sealed bearings, I put all the spacers, including the dust cover back. I am not sure you need it, and I think I saw conflicting posts on whether you do. But since the new bearings are exactly the same size as the old, I thought it safer to put it back together exactly the same way. Great picture of the parts in the correct order on the Hermit blog, as I recall.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top