Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
564 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just as the title says...

I was riding and heading turning into a gas station. As I was entering a car almost hit me head on and I had to hit the brakes. I was still kinda leaned over. But as soon as I grabbed the breaks I feel my front wheel just slip and I slam onto the ground. I was so pissed off and full of adrenaline and managed to pick up the beast pretty fast to the point where it was still running!...and then stall out because it was still in gear. The car drove off and the gas attendant came out running ask if I was okay. Needless to say I'm fine. It turns out the gas station I went to uses the same smooth concrete we use in our garages so there is little to no grip there.

When I got the bike up on its stand, It started up right away. Looked around the bike to asses damages. Gas tank...no dent and scratch. Muffler...no scratches other than from doing spirited riding. left side mirror very small scratch. Speedometer...very small scratch. Headlight...very small scratch. front wheel fender...grrr...2 small noticeable and deep scratches. kickstand...small scratch. Shifter peg...BROKEN!!!

I was devasted and rolled my bike to a station to pump gas. As I was pumping gas, I was almost on the verge of calling AAA to tow my bike back home all because the shifter broke. Luckily I let myself calm down. As I was sitting on the bike letting my nerves settle, I realized I was tapping my foot on the shifter!!! AWESOME...I can downshift...what about upshifting? Can't use my toes like I do normally. So after playing around with my feet and the broken shifter, I realized I can upshift by digging my heel the the front of the shift arm and pulling up. So I fired her up and off I went on the way home.

This is where it proved really difficult. It was pretty hard to tell myself to modify my riding because I took shifting for granted. I was pretty slow on a busy street trying to shift my bike. Once I got on the freeway, it was a huge sigh of relief staying in 5th gear. Getting off the freeway was okay until I had to get going again after stopping...but thank goodness it was only a couple miles away from home.

When I got home, my parents saw I was pissed. They asked what's wrong and I told them I low-sided. My mom freaks out and my dad thought I was lying because he couldnt see any damage until I pointed out the scratch on the front tire fender and broken shift peg.

With that day aside, I call my dealership and the total cost for a shift peg and rubber boot is only $13. The touch up paint cost $20....but I might as well just repair the deep scratches myself with JB Waterweld & matching spraypaint. Thank goodness the repairs are not costly

So after I work, to my local dealership I head off to.

This sucks...I have 4 accidents on my 675...and now 1 on my Bonneville.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
30,173 Posts
Well that sucks mightily - I'm glad you're OK that's the main thing, and at least your shifter repairs are inexpensive. Frankly - it's better that your shifter broke off than bending the gear selector shaft. That's fairly spendy to repair. This I know from recent annoying experience.

So.....that's the silver lining in your cloud.

Take it easy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
837 Posts
Vice Grips Shifter

AWESOME...I can downshift...what about upshifting? Can't use my toes like I do normally.
Sorry about your down episode! I broke my shifter peg as well letting her fall over and called the local dealer since I was out of town. They suggested using a small pair of vice grips attached to the shift lever and it worked great! Got me home and to the dealer for repair. I still carry the vice grips in case it ever happens again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,886 Posts
MacG - he may be erring on the accident prone, but he has a great line in poetry....


So after I work, to my local dealership I head off to.

That is a great line.

Anyway, who are we to judge on others riding habits??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
199 Posts
Glad you're ok and minimal damage to your Bonneville.

Wanted to ask you to back up to the part where the car almost hit you head on as you were entering the gas station. What exactly happened? Was it a blind entry or did the car come up from behind an obstacle where you couldn't see it? How could it have been avoided?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,592 Posts
I hit an oil slick and low sided on the left side taking clutch lever, peg, and shifter to name a few major parts. A fully fared Honda had just gone down in the same place before me, but he was able to ride off. I suppose this is the risk of a naked bike.

It makes me wonder if cutting down the shifter would save it with another off?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
564 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
In response to sweatmachine. I kind of take offense to the response, but I guess it does deserve explanation and at first glance looks like plain wrecklessness and squid-like behavior. To counter, I have always worn full gear and needless to say thanks to always wearing full gear, all accidents on a bike have been injury free. The 4 accidents on my 675 were:

1st: Coming around a blind corner and finding a Silverado truck in my lane and making me run off the road and hitting a curve indicator ejecting me from the bike and down a ravine. Granted I was new to motorcycling and hit the front brake in a panic causing my handlebars to go from one end of the tank to another.

2nd: Turning into a parking lot at work hitting a huge patch of sand in a center turn in lane. The sand was nearly the same color as the asphalt. Turns out many cars have spun out there as well. I've written to the city to sweep it up. They say they did but never gets done. I may voice a complaint at this point.

3rd: Happened at the track...my first track day at Streets of Willow---I lowsided. A combination of cold tires and going pretty fast at full lean and hitting a bump on a banked sweeper going about 70mph.

4th. Happened at the track...my second track day. Was the last session and was about to start my lap into the pits. I was at Pahrump on turn 9. Just as I was accelerating out, I all of a sudden lost grip on my rear and lowsided. Prior to the crash I had lost grip at random times on turn 3....one of them a total pucker moment where my rear was sliding violently that my feet came off the footpegs. This day made me realize why I hate Pilot Power 2cts.

To answer AAustin, I was turning left into the gas station and as soon as I entered a car was getting out and turning straight into me. I guess it was trying to exit but was turning too sharp. THe pumps were to the right. There were bushes so we couldn't see each other. Needless to say I probably won't enter through there again.



Slowgator...EXCELLENT IDEA!!! I think I'll do that from now on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
Just a little reminder that if you are leaned over and you panic when having to brake you will go down. Too many people when leaned over will grab a mit full of front brake and boom on the ground. You need to remember if you are leaned over to straiten up and apply the brakes smoothly. Not abruptly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
564 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Just a little reminder that if you are leaned over and you panic when having to brake you will go down. Too many people when leaned over will grab a mit full of front brake and boom on the ground. You need to remember if you are leaned over to straiten up and apply the brakes smoothly. Not abruptly.
I just read that last night as I was browsing through my plethora books such as Sport Riding Techniques and Proficient Riding. That was probably where I could have avoided lowsiding it: bringing it upright.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
You need to think of your traction as a dollar bill. When upright you have a full $1 in your pocket for traction. As you lean you are spending that dollar. On good tires under good road conditons and in a decent lean you have about 70 cents traction left for braking while 30 sents are used up in traction for the lean. As you straighten the bike up you regain the money lost!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
980 Posts
I just read that last night as I was browsing through my plethora books such as Sport Riding Techniques and Proficient Riding. That was probably where I could have avoided lowsiding it: bringing it upright.
This a a main topic at a basic riding course. After 5 accidents, it might be time to go check one out. After you took offense to Sweat's post, your examples of your mishaps were all avoidable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
I just read that last night as I was browsing through my plethora books such as Sport Riding Techniques and Proficient Riding. That was probably where I could have avoided lowsiding it: bringing it upright.
This same thing happened to me 2 weeks ago on a left hand turn in the middle of an intersection. Everybody stopped in front of me and I too grabbed the brakes. There is no way in hell anyone would have time to get a bike upright and then stop in a circumstance where they are surprised. Granted in my case, I shouldn't have been following so close and I was in a hurry ...and I shouldn't have been in that situation to be so surprised. Anyway, believe me, I understand your pain.

Get better man.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,294 Posts
Tooblekain, anyone probably would feel a little offended. Good on ya for overcoming it and continuing a valuable and civil discussion.

at first glance looks like plain wrecklessness
If it were wrecklessness, we wouldn't be having this discussion. :p Wrecklessness is something we should all aspire to. I've been wreckless for, let's see, about 18 months. The risk adds to the flavor.

I'm sure you're studying chapter 5 of Proficient Motorcycling. More training is a great idea; in the meantime, try this. When you are on a nice, deserted, twisty road, give yourself a braking test. While turning, use the front brakes (very gently and carefully at first!) to get the feel for how your bike responds to mid-corner braking. Keep taximan62's excellent analogy firmly in mind. Don't overspend. You know what will happen.

But starting with gentle braking in gentle curves, practice applying the front brake. As you get more experience and gain confidence, build up to higher speed and stronger braking. You will find that unless you are really, really pushing it, you can make some use of the front brake in turns. And within one particular turn, as you slow down, you will be leaning less and less, meaning you can apply the brakes harder toward the end of the stop.

As you build up to better braking skills, you'll be more accustomed to applying brakes carefully, rather than just grabbing a fistful. And if you ever do have to brake in earnest mid-corner, you'll have a much better idea what to expect.

I will now shuffle off and do penance for injecting my heretical third cylinder into twins talk. :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
I'm sorry to be contrary to the OP.

Everyone of the above instances were avoidable, beyond that, they should be basic rider skills.

Your first event sounds like you slammed the rear two. The front just washes, it doesn't slap if you get...overzealous...with the break while leaned. You either really upset the backend or you cranked it. You lock the front it just falls. inexperience

Second....Yeah sand happens, but this is where you work? I know every pothole on the way to work, where the road salt collects ect. I ride through it all the time. inexperience again

Third/fourth event...You are inexperienced and pushing the bike to hard and don't know how to understand what it's telling you. I tracked a 100lb heavier bike with 2CT Roads, a touring tire, and if the back broke lose it was because I was messing around and weighting the inside peg. Pilot Power 2CTs were designed to be a spit track/road tire and they have amazing traction...just short of a race tire, with a fairly predictable break point and great feedback. I had a pair myself, they just didn't last long enough for how I use the bike.

Fifth time...again sounds like inexperience, you yanked the front brake and wiped. At parking lot speeds this shouldn't be an issue. Did you never practice panic stops?


I go out behind grocery stores and rip back and forth from about 40MPH and slap on the brakes till the tires squeal every few months, and I'll do it back and forth for an hour. The people working there look at me like I'm nuts and I've had a couple managers come out and ask why I was just zinging back and forth behind their stores, but generally it keeps me out of trouble.

Seriously, take some classes track classes, MSF whatever floats your boat. Reading doesn't cut it, it certainly helps, but there is no replacement for an instructor correcting your bad habits. Simply put there is no real replacement for muscle memory and repetition.

May I ask how you hold the controls? Brake and clutch four/two/no fingers?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
I'm sorry to be contrary to the OP.

Everyone of the above instances were avoidable, beyond that, they should be basic rider skills. ....
Avoidable? Tell that to the highly trained F-18 pilot that just slammed his jet into a San Diego neighborhood today. My point is that no matter how much training you have, no matter how many times you practice skills, you will go down. There are always circumstances that are beyond our control. Admittedly it's good to practice and be vigilant but, sometimes even after riding for almost 40 years, circumstances might dictate whether you fall or not.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,294 Posts
Safety is unachievable. Not all accidents can be avoided. Risk is part of life. Develop your skills, wear ATGATT, and get on with riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
Avoidable? Tell that to the highly trained F-18 pilot that just slammed his jet into a San Diego neighborhood today. My point is that no matter how much training you have, no matter how many times you practice skills, you will go down. There are always circumstances that are beyond our control. Admittedly it's good to practice and be vigilant but, sometimes even after riding for almost 40 years, circumstances might dictate whether you fall or not.
True to an extent, but FIVE times? That tops my record including races for the last 15 years. Considering that the root cause of the the first and fifth crashes were the same thing, misuse of the front brake, I would say he isn't learning very fast.

For me

1) Lowsided in the grass after having to dodging someone pulling out 100 feet in front, I swung into oncoming traffic just in time to dodge a mobile home coming down the other lane and the wind blast got me in the weeds....this was in 97. No real damage to either me or the bike as oppsoed to dodging the lady that cut me off and a head on collision.

2) Highside at Road Atlanta back end got away from me and I lost my nuts and chopped the throttle when I felt it hit the lock, this was in 98....that was entirely my fault, but had if I just wrapped it all the way around it would have hurt a LOT less. The best part, the only reason I lost it at all was because I was trying to beat a guy under breaking and was WAY hot at tip in.

3 Lowside guy behind me at mid-ohio missed his brake marker and washed the front, his bike caught me in the back tire...bye bye. In his defense this was 10 years ago before they resurfaced it and the entrance to that corner was pretty bumpy. In 2002 I think.

Thats it, and I ride over 25,000 miles a year usually.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,263 Posts
The F-18 apparently had both engines fail...
I don't think anyone thinks riding is risk free, but all that touchy-feely-you'll-get-em-next-time-slugger stuff is great for when your kid loses their first ball game, but isn't helping this young man understand WHY he keeps crashing.
I'm with Tripped, all these accidents were avoidable. If you take offense and choose not to listen, the only person losing out is you.
Honestly, you would be better off with an MSF or Total Control class followed up by track school rather than going to track days. You are riding well over your head and lacking in basic braking and visual skills.
To your credit, you have the sense to gear up, and the fortune not to be injured.
Save the excuses for parental explanations and examine the REAL reasons you crashed; it will help you to become an OLD man riding LOL

Not trying to be d*ck, just hoping you'll open your eyes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
575 Posts
tooblekain said:
The 4 accidents on my 675 were:

1st: Coming around a blind corner and finding a Silverado truck in my lane and making me run off the road and hitting a curve indicator ejecting me from the bike and down a ravine. Granted I was new to motorcycling and hit the front brake in a panic causing my handlebars to go from one end of the tank to another.
There are valid reasons why everyone who knows better would tell you to not have a supersport as your first street bike.



tooblekain said:
I just read that last night
You should have read that before you ever threw a leg over a motorbike at the MSF course. I don’t get it, people will study for days for a final exam at school, but no one seems to think about studying up on an activity where if they fail the test they die.



vonroll said:
Avoidable? Tell that to the highly trained F-18 pilot that just slammed his jet into a San Diego neighborhood today.
Freak mechanical failures (you being a lazy SOB and not checking your mount out before a ride is your damn fault) and animal strikes are about the only two things in this world that I would consider unavoidable. Though I do understand there aren’t too many deer running across airstrips.

vonroll said:
There are always circumstances that are beyond our control.
No there isn’t (aside from the two I mentioned above).

HiDesert said:
Not all accidents can be avoided.
Yes they can, by definition they can be avoided.

Let us look into the OP’s admitted “accidents”:

1) I was riding and heading turning into a gas station. As I was entering a car almost hit me head on and I had to hit the brakes. I was still kinda leaned over. But as soon as I grabbed the breaks I feel my front wheel just slip and I slam onto the ground.

Why would you be entering a fuel station at such a speed that you’re leant over to that great of an extent? False sense of security. Complacency on a motorbike is a bad thing. Why would you grab brakes while leant over? Reactionary impulse, not a trained response.

2) Coming around a blind corner and finding a Silverado truck in my lane and making me run off the road and hitting a curve indicator ejecting me from the bike and down a ravine. Granted I was new to motorcycling and hit the front brake in a panic causing my handlebars to go from one end of the tank to another.

Since he went into a tank slapper I’m going to guess there was some major panic induced reactionary impulse action happening here. That aside, always leave room to correct your drive line for instances such as this. There is no way the oncoming truck was using the entirety of both lanes, there is always an escape path.

3) Turning into a parking lot at work hitting a huge patch of sand in a center turn in lane. The sand was nearly the same color as the asphalt.

OK people listen up, car parks are an area of considerable concern for motorcycle safety. You have people driving every which fracken direction, you have pedestrians scurrying about like morons on holiday, and you have more slippy hazards than anywhere else this side of Antarctica. Oil, gravel, sand, dirt, marbles, cables, nuts, bolts, body parts, ball bearings, these are things that are always present at any given time in a parking lot. Why are we so shocked about this? This also goes back to the most recent crash of the OP, a slick concrete parking area of a place that sells petrol and oil that are poured by dimwits on the premises onto the premises. This doesn’t require a lot of pre-planning. Keep the bike as upright as is possible in these places.

4) Happened at the track...my first track day at Streets of Willow---I lowsided. A combination of cold tires and going pretty fast at full lean and hitting a bump on a banked sweeper going about 70mph.

Going all Rossi while on cold tyres is just a bad idea no matter how you slice it. You should have also done a few laps to learn the track before you attacked it, that way you would’ve known the bump was there from a previous safer slower lap.

5) Just as I was accelerating out, I all of a sudden lost grip on my rear and lowsided. Prior to the crash I had lost grip at random times on turn 3....one of them a total pucker moment where my rear was sliding violently that my feet came off the footpegs. This day made me realize why I hate Pilot Power 2cts.

You had many warnings that something was amiss with the rear rubber, yet still you pushed it to the limit. There are no trophies for DNF.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top