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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Or keep same brand ? Also, it has around 2k miles so not thinking about changing front or should I?

Mine is a 2015 Street Triple R
 

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If the tire still has some life in it, why not just plug it and carry on?
 

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Agreed. Use a plug/patch and carry on. A plug/patch is a patch that has a plug attached to it. Unlike a plug it can not work it's way out like a poorly installed or mis-sized plug.



Installed properly I'd even run one on the track. Installing properly is the key part though. To do it properly the inside of the tire should be sanded past the shiny surface. I use a air powered drill with a wire wheel. Clean it with alcohol. Use a proper vulcanizing adhesive on the cleaned surface and the patch and plug let it dry a minute then install using a steel edge roller to press it down good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't like patches on bikes, price is not a concerned ever to me when talking about bike's tires. My worries are more about mixing tires or stock OEM brand.

I don't ride too aggressive and my commute is mostly straight line.
 

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In that case,I would go with sport touring tire. I commute also 100+ miles round trip. In my research through countless reviews I came to the conclusion most of the top brands would meet my needs so I bought the ones I got the best deal on. Dunlop roadsmart 2's. Over 7k miles on then and 2 track days. I'll easily get 10k. The Dunlop's are a huge improvement over the stockers when it comes to chasing tar snakes or following milling on the highway. Totally transformed the bike for me. The bike is more stable and I'm more confident leaned over;well as leaned over as I get...lol.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G870A using Tapatalk
 

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I don't like patches on bikes, price is not a concerned ever to me when talking about bike's tires. My worries are more about mixing tires or stock OEM brand.

I don't ride too aggressive and my commute is mostly straight line.


You won't notice any difference with any tire you put on it with your riding style. Funny you're worried about a good repaired tire and just straight line ride but worried about mismatched tires.

That plug-patch shown above is a solid repair good for life of tire, have done a few over the years with zero issues. UNLESS, the nail is on the side or near the sidewall of tire. Center portion of tire no problem.
 

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This is what I use. It's not as comprehensive a fix as the plug/patch above, but great for DIY and roadside fixes, because you don't need to remove the tire from the wheel. I recently had to plug one of my car tires with it, and it's holding air at least as good as the non-plugged tires.



I wouldn't hesitate to use it - and have used it - on my bike tires, and continue to ride them as though they weren't plugged - including doing track days. Even if the plug somehow fails, it would only be a slow deflation, not some spontaneous, catastrophic, blow-out type failure.
 
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Good operating practice holds that front and rear tires should always be from the same manufacturer's same product line. These have been tested for handling and general compatibility. You're the tester if brands or models are mixed.

For example, I recently changed the tires on my Triumph T100, going with new OEM Bridgestone BT45s front and rear. There are lots of more exotic and more expensive choices out there, but these have worked very well for a long time. I bought Bridgestone's matching tubes, too.
 

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VAST majority of riders blindfolded could not tell the difference between brands mismatched on the bike. All modern rubber these days are great...your bike will not blow up or veer off the road due to mismatched tires from different manufacturers. Really. It's ok.

I've run all sorts of tires on my bikes over the years to include mis-matched brands with zero issues. I am a seasoned rider that rides in advanced class on track days and have my preferences on tires, but normal street riding won't care one bit. I am more concerned with what kind of tire it is (sporty, sport touring, etc..) than what brand. They all work.
 
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