Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
509 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
About to head out for an extended weekend of riding and my rear tire has a nail in it. The Metzeler Tourance Next.

I am reading mixed comments about fixing it and riding 1,500 to 2,000 kms.
Automotive tire Hood Tread Tire Grey
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,402 Posts
If it's not too near the sidewall, I'd take it out, see if it goes down, which it looks like it will, get it professionally repaired, and enjoy your weekend. I've had a million and fifty four punctures like that over the years, all repaired with no detrimental effects :)

Let us know how you get on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
647 Posts
The problem you'll run into is that no tire shop nor any motorcycle dealer will repair a motorcycle tire. Some won't even mount a repaired tire for you. The best solution I've found is to either dismount the tire yourself if you have the tools for it or take the wheel and tire to a dealer and ask them to dismount it. Don't ask for anything more than dismounting it. Then take the tire and wheel back home and apply a patch to the inside of the tire. Makes sure you clean an abrade the area around the puncture as instructed for the patch you're using. You might consider inserting one of those string patches through the puncture hole as a means of keeping water out because water will start to corrode the steel belt if there is one in there. But you'll need to cut the string patch off flush with the inside of the tire at the hole so the patch you apply to the inside of the tire will seal properly.

Apply the patch inside the tire and remount it in its original location on the wheel so you won't have to re-balance it. Mounting the tire is much, much easier than dismounting. I have used this method countless times to fix motorcycle tires (my own--I won't fix yours) and have never had a repair fail despite putting thousands of miles on the repairs.
 

·
Registered
Tiger 900
Joined
·
27 Posts
As mentioned, applying the patch on the inside of the tire with it off the wheel is the safest/cleanest way to go. My local shop has done this for me 3 times so far, but they always examined the puncture to make sure it's repairable. And with your image, I don't see why it wouldn't be.

So I would just call a local motorcycle shop and ask if they are willing to repair it. If not, you can do a patch from the outside yourself and monitor it. In the end, you'll have to decide what solution you feel is safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I have done simple rope patch on about 6 tires. I have never had an issue with them.
2 rear tires I have had less the 200 miles on them & got nails in them.
On the rears I have rode them to bald status (about 12000 miles on my Tiger 800) just keep a frequent eye on air pressure if you go this route. every fill up.
If front tire I would just not ride as aggressive as I normally would. Nor would I put the usually 18,000 miles on them either.
I was riding 10-12000 miels a year - 90% commuting.
 

·
Registered
2019 Triumph Tiger XCA
Joined
·
59 Posts
I agree with the "patch it" crowd, assuming when you pull out the nail it loses air. If not, I would say you are good to go. One, a rear tire going flat is not nearly the problem of a front tire going flat and Two, a patch is fine if done correctly. Unless we are talking "track day" or "sanctioned race", a patch is fine. IMHO.
 

·
Registered
Tiger 900 GT Pro Svartpilen 401
Joined
·
1,202 Posts
I would pull out the nail and plug it. You have TPMS that will alert you if the pressure drops out on the road. Carry a pump just in case.

On a previous bike I picked it up after a service and the guy said they found a nail in a tyre and patched it for me. Some places don't mind patching bike tyres, others might have a liability aversion and refuse patching. I didn't ask what patch method they used but my guess is they didn't remove the tyre. Some places use a mushroom patch that pushes through from the outside.

I've had earlier bikes patched as well - one of them picked up a roofing screw from when guys were working on a roof at my work and must have dropped a box of them in the grass where I parked the bike. I later picked up a handful of them searching through the grass. Roofing screws are much more savage than a nail, but the patch held.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
509 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for all the replies everyone. I just got back from my weekend trip. I took the Bonnie and decided to not let the Tiger ruin my weekend.

The tire lost 5 lbs pressure from Thursday night to Saturday morning. I just checked and it has lost 2 lbs since then.

I am going to review all the posts tomorrow after I get some sleep. It would be nice if I could get it fixed to get this year out them before switching.

I did 1,400 kms (870 miles) over three days on the Bonnie. My throttle wrist and shifter leg are worn out. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
509 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
In my opinion this is a perfect excuse for replacing that Tourance Next tire and get a proper one that will transform your riding pleasure.

Chico
To be honest, this did occur to me because I am leaning towards the Road 6 for when I replace them. The bike had 4500 kms and I have only put about 1,000 kms since I have owned it. I convinced myself over the weekend that if I have to buy a new year tire, I might as well get the front too and be done with it. However, I don't think I have ridden the bike on the Tourance tires long enough to appreciate the difference with new shoes. The other people on this thread and elsewhere have convinced me that I should plug it and enjoy it. To that end, I have a question for our expert pluggers.

I watched a lot of videos and everyone has made a hole, drilling straight down into the tire, to show how to plug it. My nail is going in at an angle. Am I safe to assume I should follow the hole direction when enlarging it for the plug?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
About to head out for an extended weekend of riding and my rear tire has a nail in it. The Metzeler Tourance Next.

I am reading mixed comments about fixing it and riding 1,500 to 2,000 kms. View attachment 784327
Piece of piss to fix yourself with a tubeless bung kit. The only issue is that it is in a rain groove, as my last puncture was; so, you may need more than one bung to repair the hole, as the contact with the road is less.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top