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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After trying different equipment to be comfortable in extended hwy riding in temps in the low 30s, I could keep everything decent except for my finger tips. Tried better winter gloves and glove liners that helped but it still got painful on the finger tips.

So a friend told me to try good mittens. I thought they would be hard to ride with so never considered them. I bought some winter, water-proof mittens and did a test today.

When I left the house about 8:30 am the temp was 35 degrees with a constant light rain. I put on my thick gloves with silk liners and thicker liners over them. Within 10 minutes my finger tips were uncomfortable already and I was still in the neighborhood area. The hand control feeling was not good but manageable.

I then put on the mittens over the same double liners. They were warmer after riding for about 10 minutes but I got cramps in the webs of my hands between the thumbs and pointing finger. So I took off the silk liners to allow more room. Much better then and very good hand control feeling.

After about 15 minutes of hwy riding my finger tips started to get chilled, so I just tried letting my finger tips not grip and point more straight so just my palms were griping. This allowed more of an air gap all around the finger tips. WALLAH!!! My finger tips got warm again except for my thumb tips. So I extended my fingers over my thumbs and tucked my thumbs under the finger air flow so my thumb tips were shielded by the mitts. I rode for about an hour and a half like that on the hwy and ALL was comfortable as long as I didn't grip with my finger tips. The gloves gave me no relief no matter what I tried.

So if you were able to stay awake through this boring post of mine, it is true, mittens ARE better than gloves, especially when the correct grip technique is found.

Just got home and the digital temp reads 37 degrees so the weather stayed consistent.
 

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I admire brave souls who are not afeared of cold temps!
Your perception of mittens must be true, I've never seen "snowmobiling gloves", just mittens. Lucky for you, riding is a possibility. The past few days in western PA have been in the 40's and 50's but raining. I'll pass on wet roads with gravel till I get new tires on.
 

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Have you looked at 9v solutions? I understand now why guys up north get electric grips. And you use an electric vest right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, an electric vest I use. There has to be something, somewhere that touches you that generates heat besides yourself if you are in prolonged periods of cold without being able to move to generate heat. In affect, the electric vest helps keep the whole body warm as long as they are insulated.

From what reading I've done about 9v batteries, they use up a lot of batteries and are not worth it.

I'm just very happy to finally find a solution for my finger tips that does not require electric gloves, electric grips, hand guards or Hippo Muffs.

Now if I could only find motorcycle tires with spikes so I could ride on the icy roads that are coming tonight. LOL.
 

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Bonnie-Black,

Are you a smoker ? I found when I smoked that I needed extremely good gloves to keep the finger tips from hurting and getting the first stages of frost-bite.

I used leather insulated skiing gloves, which stopped all the pain in my finger tips. At the time I was riding 35-45 mins
at highway speeds (in NJ that's 75(+)) and then 10 -15 mins in stop and go traffic.

But when I quit smoking alot of the above problems went away, the blood was able to circulate better in my fingers.
 

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On 2007-01-15 08:21, wenzel850 wrote:
Are you a smoker ? I found when I smoked that I needed extremely good gloves to keep the finger tips from hurting and getting the first stages of frost-bite...........But when I quit smoking alot of the above problems went away, the blood was able to circulate better in my fingers.
Hmmm..... very interesting, not smoking means more oxygen in the blood? Blood better able to fuel the cellular level processes that fuel the body and warm it as a by-product? Just guessing, don't know the physiology. Anyone here know this stuff?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Am I a smoker? Of what? :)

No I don't smoke but I'm on the lean side. Not much body fat for insulation. I've always had cold finger tips when the weather got chilly.

That is an interesting observation though about smoking.
 

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jstark,
Not up on all the physiology of it but, long term smoking does effect circulation in the extemities. I believe it's a constriction of the blood vessels that is a by-product of nicotine, and increased carbon-dioxide levels in the blood stream.
I used to smoke, (20 years) and quit about six years ago. I don't really experiance the loss of profussion (oxygen-circulation)in my limbs, but *****, breathing can be hard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Question:

For all the non-smokers out there; are you saying that your finger tips don't get cold riding on the hwy in 35 degrees on a rainy day?
 

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Good posting. Dressing in layers requires a little air space to be effective. Same thing extreme weather gear manufacturers refer to when comparing down when it gets wet/compacted/no air vs other materials that maintain insulation qualities even when wet.

Glad you got it worked out, fun to ride year round when you can make it relatively comfortable.

BobW
 

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On 2007-01-15 15:43, black-bonnie wrote:
Question:

For all the non-smokers out there; are you saying that your finger tips don't get cold riding on the hwy in 35 degrees on a rainy day?
Never smoked in my life, 50 years old, and yes, my finger tips get cold on the Bonnie. Found the best way to fight it is make sure my body core is warm, but there are limits........ What has made a difference this year is the V-strom with its hand guards. No wind blowing on the hands = warm fingers on extended rides!
 

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Last winter my wife got me some silk inner gloves which, on short runs, made my hands much warmer. On longer runs, however, my hands got so warm that they swelled up slightly, cutting off the blood to my finger tips which then nearly froze. I have to say, though, that my outer gloves were a pretty snug fit in the first place so if I'd got myself a pair of larger ones my new silk inners would have been fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
jstark47,

I think if someone made hand guards for the bonnie, I'd give them a try. They may even look good. All I have now is a small fairing that I like.

keef,

What's the lowest temps that you found your gloves and liners work in? Does a fairing cover your hands area? Just curious.
 

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The lowest temperature I've used them in would be around minus 4 or 5 degrees centigrade. The only fairing I have is a small Fabbri flyscreen with no protection for the hands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
keef,

Minus 5 C = 23 F.

Using gloves and liners in that cold is pretty darn good. May I ask what gloves and liners are you using?

A test that was done of motorcycle gloves said that HARLEY-DAVIDSON COLD WEATHER GAUNTLET GLOVES: $80 are the warmest. They are also very bulky.
 

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I wear USGI mittens, trigger finger( I don't put my finger in the hole). They are much warmer than ANY glove I have tried. They also have gauntlets that reach to mid forearm.
The coldest I have ridden is 5 Deg. F. Your tax dollars at work, Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
GUNGUY45,

Thanks for the info. Yesterday in Austin is was in the 30s and rainy all day again. I rode with just the mittens and no liners this time for a few hours and my fingers did fine until I was in the city streets and had to work the front brake and clutch. As soon as my finger tips get near the surface of the wet mitts, they got a bit chilled. Something I could easily live with as long as they stay warm on hwy riding where the fingers stay away from the mitt's surfaces.

So you agree, mittens are the way to go for cold weather. They are actually quite easy to use on a motorcycle to my surprise.
 

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On 2007-01-19 12:44, black-bonnie wrote:
keef,

Minus 5 C = 23 F.

Using gloves and liners in that cold is pretty darn good. May I ask what gloves and liners are you using?
Yeah, it was a bit chilly - not to mention slippery on the road.
My gloves are made by GPL and are leather with Kevlar abrasion-point pads and are Hipora (a bit like Goretex) and 3M Thinsulate lined. When it's really cold I use Patra pure silk inner gloves.
 
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