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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been waiting for this bike for over a month now. I can't say how excited I've been because there are simply no words that can explain the feeling! It is seriously the most excited I've been for anything in awhile. I started out riding a 2008 Ninja 250R and I wanted a bike with a little more soul. I saw a picture of a Triumph custom online and that's where it all began..



Ever since this pic I've been obsessing with Triumph's. I've done plenty of research and have come to realize this isn't a bike I can just ride without worrying about. I still have plenty to learn. That's where you guys come in! I'm going to need as much help and advice as possible. I already saw GPZ' post in the other 'new to triumph' thread and there is some great info there. First thing I can notice with this bike is it needs a front end alignment, which is why I bumped that other thread. After that, I don't know what I should do! The seller says he put fresh oil and plugs in, and that's all I know. I'm going to ask him more about the history but don't know how much I'll be able to get out of him as I don't think it was his personal bike! So, on with the facts.. It is a '70 TR6R with almost 17k. How soon am I looking at a rebuild? When do you typically have to rebuild a Triumph motor? When should I rebuild the suspension? Transmission flush? Anything you guys could recommend that will help me keep her running tip top I am all ears for. I am looking forward to learning more and can't wait to get it on the road. One last thing, he shipped the bike without the keys! I haven't even heard it run yet! He's really testing my patience but so far it has definitely been worth the wait. Thanks in advance for any help you guys have to offer. All the best.



 

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Holy Guacamole!

Nice bike.

First do "the list" (from the other thread), then ride it and see what else it MIGHT need (besides the alignment).

Many times, you can simply loosen the bottom fork cap bolts, lower yoke pinch bolts, and fork top caps, then have a stout, strong ssist hold the front wheel steady while you yank the appropriate handlebar to set the steering straight. Once it's straight, you tighten everything from the bottom to the top, re-checking the alignment as you go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Will do! Hopefully I get the keys here soon. Sorry for the crappy cell phone pics, they really don't do this bike justice. This thing is mint! Is this an original paint scheme for 1970?
 

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I nearly ended up with that bike back in 1970 in London. However the one I looked at had after market mufflers so I passed. I ended up with a new flake blue Norton. If one did not pre order a Triumph back in 1970 you could not find any at the dealerships in London. I have a 70 t120r now but I do not care for the burgandy color. The BRG color looks super. You seem to have purchased a lovely bike. I know how you must be feeling. Enjoy!
 

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Rivera, you got yourself there, in my completely unbiased opinion, the best Triumph they ever made. The color Spring Gold is absolutely superb, and the condition of your paint job looks to be very nice. Keep a good coat of high quality wax polish on her.

Take it easy on her at first, the brakes are good, but require a bit more front lever and back pedal movement (especially for the rear) compared to a modern bike. I'd definately do a full fluids change (Castrol 20-50 with the red cap) for the motor and primary, and 90 weight gear oil for the trans. Get yourself a workshop manual, you can get from Rabers online or Klempfs (one good thing is there's many sources for all kinds of parts for this bike). That checklist looks pretty extensive, follow that and she'll be sittin' pretty ready for the season. They say that every time before you start it, pull in the clutch and crank the kick starter once, this will free the clutch plates if they're sticking. Tickle her once and give the kicker a good whack like you mean it (push in the tickler button on the carb until gas starts to dribble out, no need to pump it just push it in and hold it down) (I actually tickle mine once and crank it over slowly with the iginition turned off to build up a little oil pressure and prime the combustion chamber, then I tickle her again with the key on and one good whack and she starts right up no fuss), (no choke). She should start right up. You might have to work at it a while if she hasn't been running for a few months. Get the idle and air/fuel mixture set right if it isn't already so she's idling cold at about 800 rpm (once she warms up it'll rise to about 950). Always use the highest octane gas, it makes a big difference.

Good luck with your 1970 Tiger, treat her right and she'll treat you right, she sure is a beauty!!!!

Cheers .. GleaminTwin
 

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Holy Cow Man,

that is one sweet bike you ended up with. You are never
going to get anywhere on that bike. You will have too
many people around it at all times looking at your ride,
you will never get close enough.

Pookybear
 

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Great looking bike, congrats! By the way, if you know anyone with a Triumph of similar era - their key might work in your bike. The keys to mine were lost and I've been using a copy of a friend's, and his isn't even the same year. Doesn't fit perfectly put does the job. Very high security ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I nearly ended up with that bike back in 1970 in London. However the one I looked at had after market mufflers so I passed. I ended up with a new flake blue Norton. If one did not pre order a Triumph back in 1970 you could not find any at the dealerships in London. I have a 70 t120r now but I do not care for the burgandy color. The BRG color looks super. You seem to have purchased a lovely bike. I know how you must be feeling. Enjoy!
thanks man, are you saying i shouldn't put some wassell cocktail shakers on there??? haha.. ;)

Rivera, you got yourself there, in my completely unbiased opinion, the best Triumph they ever made. The color Spring Gold is absolutely superb, and the condition of your paint job looks to be very nice. Keep a good coat of high quality wax polish on her.

Take it easy on her at first, the brakes are good, but require a bit more front lever and back pedal movement (especially for the rear) compared to a modern bike. I'd definately do a full fluids change (Castrol 20-50 with the red cap) for the motor and primary, and 90 weight gear oil for the trans. Get yourself a workshop manual, you can get from Rabers online or Klempfs (one good thing is there's many sources for all kinds of parts for this bike). That checklist looks pretty extensive, follow that and she'll be sittin' pretty ready for the season. They say that every time before you start it, pull in the clutch and crank the kick starter once, this will free the clutch plates if they're sticking. Tickle her once and give the kicker a good whack like you mean it (push in the tickler button on the carb until gas starts to dribble out, no need to pump it just push it in and hold it down) (I actually tickle mine once and crank it over slowly with the iginition turned off to build up a little oil pressure and prime the combustion chamber, then I tickle her again with the key on and one good whack and she starts right up no fuss), (no choke). She should start right up. You might have to work at it a while if she hasn't been running for a few months. Get the idle and air/fuel mixture set right if it isn't already so she's idling cold at about 800 rpm (once she warms up it'll rise to about 950). Always use the highest octane gas, it makes a big difference.

Good luck with your 1970 Tiger, treat her right and she'll treat you right, she sure is a beauty!!!!

Cheers .. GleaminTwin
thanks for the tips! i dunno about the best triumph but i sure do love it.

Holy Cow Man,

that is one sweet bike you ended up with. You are never
going to get anywhere on that bike. You will have too
many people around it at all times looking at your ride,
you will never get close enough.

Pookybear
haha, lets hope thats not entirely true.

Great looking bike, congrats! By the way, if you know anyone with a Triumph of similar era - their key might work in your bike. The keys to mine were lost and I've been using a copy of a friend's, and his isn't even the same year. Doesn't fit perfectly put does the job. Very high security ;)
that doesn't sound good. what do you guys recommend for extra security? also, what is a good classic motorcycle insurance company?

the bobber is not yours? but the green one is?

at least is is what I thought when I read it again.
bobbers not mine, its the bike that got me interested in triumphs in the first place.

thanks for everyones input/compliments. i'm really looking forward to getting to know the ins and outs of this bike. another question, this bike is coming from ca and as you guys can see i'm in utah. quite the altitude change. what do you guys recommend as far as carb adjustment? i was told i may need a rejet. any thoughts? thanks in advance fellas.
 

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what do you guys recommend for extra security? also, what is a good classic motorcycle insurance company?
I lock my bike to something stationary with an enormous chain. I mean really, it's just a bit bigger than a bicycle and two motivated individuals can pick it up and throw it in the back of a van or truck. There's also alarms and various types of specialty locks out there.

As for insurance, I use Progressive. Although I've never had to file a claim so who knows what that'll be like. I was pleased that I was able to get my insurance sorted out online in about 15 minutes, with proof of insurance via email almost instantly. It made getting the bike registered that much easier / faster.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I lock my bike to something stationary with an enormous chain. I mean really, it's just a bit bigger than a bicycle and two motivated individuals can pick it up and throw it in the back of a van or truck. There's also alarms and various types of specialty locks out there.

As for insurance, I use Progressive. Although I've never had to file a claim so who knows what that'll be like. I was pleased that I was able to get my insurance sorted out online in about 15 minutes, with proof of insurance via email almost instantly. It made getting the bike registered that much easier / faster.
i'll have to look into some security devices. the reason i ask about insurance is cause the bike is only worth so much to them, if it got stolen or wrecked, i would lose a lot of money. that's why i've been considering classic motorcycle insurance so i can have peace of mind. anyone here have specialty insurance on their bike?
 

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I went with progressive on my "68" and they asked me how much it was worth. I guess with them you can insure it for what you think it's worth and they adjust the premium accordingly.
 
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