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Discussion Starter #1
Got to see my new bike this weekend and I love it. There are a few little issues that I need to fix, though. First, after I start it cold and let it warm for a couple of minutes, it idles at about 1,000 rpm's (or a little less) and I can shift it into 1st gear easily, but when it thoroughly warms up after 5 - 10 minutes riding, the engine's idling speed increases to about 2,000 rpm's and I have to shift into second to stop the tranny internals from spinning and then slip it into first, if I try going right into 1st gear when it's idling that high, it grinds the gears and then goes into 1st. So that's either a clutch adjustment or idling adjustment or both that it needs (this is my newbie guess at least). Second the rear brake has to be pressed down about an inch and a half before it starts to work and the wing nut on the rear brake adjuster is screwed up almost all the way on the threads, so maybe it needs new rear brake shoes or need the brakes adjusted somehow. The motor sounds and runs excellent and it goes down the road great, actually engine vibration is not bad at all. All things considered I'm thrilled with it, I just need to address these minor issues, also need to install a new steering lock as I have no key for the current one, actually have only one ignition key as well, has Union stamped on it and a code so maybe I can get a replacement of that. Cheers, all and here's a few pictures of it:





 

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**** fine lookin ride! Idle adjustment is pretty simple. It's the screw on the right side of the carburetor. (Of the 2, it's the one to the rear ... the other is the air / fuel mixture) Get it hot then bring the idle down. Then adjust the air / fuel to bring the idle back up. Keep this up until you get the idle where you want it and the a/f isn't idling it up any more. You'll get to where you can 'feel' the carb adjustment. Do a search on clutch adjustment. Bike looks like it was recently restored, so it would shock me if the clutch is shot ... although, it does sound like your rear brake shoes are dead. That wingnut on the brake rod IS the brake adjustment. I know on my '70 500, I can easily lock the rear brake after getting it adjusted. And the twin leading shoe front brake is a monster (as drum brakes go) ... and mine is only 7 inches. (My BRAKE DRUM!! :) )

Anyway, sounds like you're only a couple of minor tweaks away from having a real fun summer! Be prepared to be late to stuff all the time because of all the folks who want to stop you and talk about your bike ...

Here's Mine:
 

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Re the brake adjustment. Check you have plenty of brake lining. if so remove the operating lever from the splined spindle on teh wheel from off the splines and refit it a spline different ( back) this will give you more room for your adjusting nut. NOTE. the adjustment position on your bike looks correct, being just before top dead centre, the brake should start to bind at that point ( relative to the splined operating arm) IT may have been replaced a spline or two off.

nice bike, that model/year is probably my all time favourite

hope this helps
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hey guys, thanks a lot for the compliments. Also thanks for the advice about re-positioning the brake lever on the rear hub on it's spline as a possible remedy to the adjuster wing nut being fully threaded on it's adjustment threads, one way or another (either myself doing it or at a shop I'll have to inspect the drum's lining for thickness and the shoes). I just got my owner's handbook in the mail tonight, and I was thumbing through it, and it mentioned the "air control" on the handlebar, meaning the choke, and said "close the lever to the stop to richen the mixture only when starting a cold motor". Well, the way the bike was delivered to me the choke lever was rotated fully clockwise against the stop, I assumed that was the choke closed position, but now I'm thinking maybe the choke was fully open. That might explain my problem of the idle rising to 2,000 rpm's when the bike warms up, and then my resulting difficulty in shifting into 1st gear at such a high idle, at low, cold idle of 1,000 rpm's it shifted into 1st gear fine, and if I was rolling down a gentle hill even with the 2,000 rpm warmed up idle, it would still slip into 1st fine, it was just at a stop with the high idle that I would grind going into 1st, and then realized that if I put it into 2nd it would stop the tranny internals from spinning, then I'd slip her into 1st. The picture below shows my choke lever position, fully clockwise, I just would like to confirm, is this the choke fully open or fully closed?

 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sweet! Thanks, you have confirmed what I suspected. Most likely my high idling problem was caused by starting bike with choke wide open and leaving it wide open the whole time I was running it. Now that I look at the choke lever it makes sense that in that clockwise direction it's pulling on the cable, and opening the choke. Why it was delivered to me like that, who knows. Now, I just have to figure out if I can fix the brake issue myself or I'm better off bringing it to a shop. I guess if it's in the shop, I could have the whole bike thoroughly checked over, clutch adjusted, the grease fittings greased, maybe the valves adjusted, although I don't think it needs that, I'm just saying I don't really know what to look for in making certain that the bike is properly sorted and adjusted just right. I'll have to look through my service manual to see how complicated it is to check the drum lining for thickness.
 

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My old 59 shifts like that. with the idle low, it will go into first real easy. I usualy shift to second, then first anyway, as I got in the habit while riding other Brirbikes. I usr ATF in the primary on the 59, I don't know if it is possible on yours. One suggestion is ,no matter how long the valve tappet clearance is set; re check then after a couple hundre miles. The head tends to 'bed down' using up the clearance. If it hasnt' already bed downed, you will ahve to recheck the torque on the head. After a while those things settle down.
 

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Sorry folks.I'm a little confused.I thought that the lever position(in the picture)on the choke is set to 'off'.
I searched old posts under 'choke lever' and came up with the same info. Do I have it backwards?
Thanks for any other opinions.
The bike is a beauty by the way.
 

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Sorry folks.I'm a little confused.I thought that the lever position(in the picture)on the choke is set to 'off'.
I searched old posts under 'choke lever' and came up with the same info. Do I have it backwards?
Thanks for any other opinions.
The bike is a beauty by the way.
ok , my oldie doesn't have a choke , but was just answering by looking at the picture and using logic . looks at the pic and how the cable enters the control , reads poster say "The picture below shows my choke lever position, fully clockwise,...." .

unless the choke is turned off by tensioning the cable .....?
 

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If there is no slack on the choke cable the choke is on (the choke slide is down in the carb). If you pull the lever and put tension on the cable it raises the choke slide and takes the choke off.

Retro is right. The choke is off in the picture.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
OK, thanks, that's good information. With my Lambretta, the choke is on when the cable is pulled, but that's a Dell Orto carb. I thought I had discovered that my choke was on with the Tiger, explaining my idle mysteriously rising from 1,000 cold to 2,000 warm, instead it must be my carb adjustment/air fuel ratio need fiddling with to get a constant 1,000 rpm idle whether it's cold or warm. The owners handbook does say "Close the lever to the stop to richen the mixture only when starting a cold motor", but there's probably another stop in the counterclockwise direction.
 

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If there is no slack on the choke cable the choke is on (the choke slide is down in the carb). If you pull the lever and put tension on the cable it raises the choke slide and takes the choke off.

Retro is right. The choke is off in the picture.
really ? who woulda guessed . my appoligies . totally opposite of ........ never mind . i was going to say normal , but then it is British :)
 

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Here is the the intake side of the choke. The yellow line is pointing to the choke slide. When the lever and cable are slack, the slide is in the down position. Because the cable comes in from the top, pulling on the choke lever pulls the choke slide up out of the way.



While were on the subject of carbs....If you adjust it yourself, and by all means mess around with it, it's not that hard. These are the screws you want to play with. "A" is the air mixture screw and "B" is the throttle stop screw. There are plenty of threads on how to do this and you workshop manual also explains what to do. I'd tell you how I did mine but my carb is messed up so I'm not sure I'm doing anything right at this moment!

 

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Just to show that my favorite oxymoron is "foolproof" (I guess they haven't seen my talent level, fool wise) I personally know it's possible to install the top of the carb on backward so the slide and choke face the wrong way.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I'm having the bike brought into the city tomorrow, going to have the bike fully sorted by a shop that specializes in these old British bikes. Then I have to decide if I'll keep it here in the city (this was my original plan) or out in the suburbs in my mom's garage, I'm leaning towards keeping it in the city. My mom is definately a good sport because right now she's letting me keep 3 motorcycles crammed in her single car garage. I have to get used to the shifter on the other side from my Scrambler, I had a little bit of a brain freeze when I was doing some braking at an intersection on this TR6R trying to get the locations of the front brake, clutch lever, rear brake and shifter locations straight in my mind. When you guys start your bikes, do you ever pull in the clutch lever and operate the clutch lever several times to free the clutch? The owner's handbook recommends doing this. Here's another couple shots of this little beauty:



 
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