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I was five. I'm truly glad I only know of the Vietnam war and those times via documentaries and stories. Seems like there wasn't enough peace, love and cookies :(

Did generate some excellent music though, although the point about commercializing pain is noted.
Yes, I now can see how it might now be seen as a 'commercial appropriation' of the pain of the ones involved, but the take from my friends, and certainly their parents, was entirely positive toward the song. It actually changed the minds of many adults connected to the school.

We were all quite a bit less media sophisticated and cynical in those days, the warm flowing ooze of the great ****e-train was just getting started and hadn't affected us at that time.
 

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As with all history, it has to be taken in the context of the views at the time. But yes, some great music. I remember listening to a lot of Jethro Tull about that time and riding around in my pale yellow '63 Karmann Ghia convertible. ...J.D.
 

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As with all history, it has to be taken in the context of the views at the time....J.D.
More people should remember that. maybe there wouldn't be as much discord in this country as there is now.
Respectfully, what are both of your opinions of the views at that time in history and now?

IMHO, generally the opinions broke down along lines of age, with younger people being anti-war, anti-establishment. It was a social revolution and there are definitely parallels that can be seen today.
 

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I don't know if I want to get in to this on this site. Respect for the rules of this format comes in to play. Yes there was social revolution happening at the time, and yes there is some of that going on today. My only statement is "Do not re-write history. What happened -- happened". I have no regrets. ...J.D.
 

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I don't know if I want to get in to this on this site. Respect for the rules of this format comes in to play. Yes there was social revolution happening at the time, and yes there is some of that going on today. My only statement is "Do not re-write history. What happened -- happened". I have no regrets. ...J.D.
Understood. And yes, what happened was important for many reasons that continue to impact us today. But did we as a nation learn anything? Did that young generation's actions improve the world somehow? The rhetoric continues.
 

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If you live long enough you will experience history as an unbroken circle of repeats. Movements arise to counteract injustice which do at the time "improve" the world or at least locally. Then over time those generations become old and fade away to allow younger generations to experience their own social injustices that spawn movements that try to steer clear of the chaos and inequities. Repeat, repeat, repeat......... This has been going on for thousands of years, generation after generation. As far as I'm concerned, nothing changes but the players. Knowledge is gained, lost and regained, only to be lost once again.
 

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If you live long enough you will experience history as an unbroken circle of repeats. Movements arise to counteract injustice which do at the time "improve" the world or at least locally. Then over time those generations become old and fade away to allow younger generations to experience their own social injustices that spawn movements that try to steer clear of the chaos and inequities. Repeat, repeat, repeat......... This has been going on for thousands of years, generation after generation. As far as I'm concerned, nothing changes but the players. Knowledge is gained, lost and regained, only to be lost once again.
I tend to agree with you with one caveat. We are living longer now. Hopefully as our lifespan and more importantly, quality of life improves, we will make lasting improvements on our decisions.
 

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I sorta had the same feelings as you regarding Young writing the song and it being released in a matter of a few days. Two years ago there was a thread about this very event in history, I have a different perspective on what Young did because of what Weedie wrote in response to me saying the same thing as you, mind you I'm not making a comment on your thoughts, just that mine changed after reading what someone like Weedie (who had more invested then I) thought about it.

Here is a link to that thread from 2 years ago https://www.triumphrat.net/biker-hang-out/824338-may-4-1970-a.html
I don't disagree with what Weedie wrote but at 13 I would have never heard of Kent State if Young didn't write the song. Unlike today, I didn't read newspapers or watch the news at that age. Probably was better off that way! Having said that I never liked bands protest or political songs-that's not what I listen to music for. That's why I got bored listening to CSN&Y years ago. They're all still trying to write protest songs (individually) 50 years later!
 

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I am just beginning to see the generational issue from the other side. At 73 I have adult kids. They are all 3 successful, productive citizens, yet because Dad has a few nonconventional ideas, I feel they tend to discount everything I have to offer in the way of advice. Do not be afraid to learn something from those that went before you. We did not do it perfectly, but we inherited a mess from our elders as well. In the end, you still have to live with the decisions you make. ...J.D.
 

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I was five. I'm truly glad I only know of the Vietnam war and those times via documentaries and stories. Seems like there wasn't enough peace, love and cookies :(

Did generate some excellent music though, although the point about commercializing pain is noted.
Means you probably missed all the Jane Fonda bullseyes in the urinals then. :D

Was driving a newish DD then in the North Atlantic and Med and sitting on Russian subs. Don't let anyone tell you that was a "cold" war either, but at least most will agree it was totally justified. And if I were taken out, would have been vaporized wearing a clean shirt. ;)

Wouldn't trust documentaries much on Vietnam after maybe 1990. The PTSD from that disaster was exponentially worse than anything in the past couple of decades.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
OK many interesting response's to my question. Many were more than I expected. It was intended to be a simple question as where were you when you heard X died. (Enter a name based on your experience/age) Me? I was living in the burbs of Chicago. I came home from work and saw it on the Evening News. Understand I had been going to school in the Chicago Loop during the 68 Convention.

Lambroing as far as your comments on Hanoi Jane her visit to the North was in July of 1972 less than two months prior to the massacre in Munich. The August Madison WI bombing was much closer (time wise)to Kent State


K
 

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Yes, but we now see the younger generation as no hopers and lazy. Funny how time can alter the perspective on things. :)
Yep! :smile2: Every generation poo poos the next one and the one before it.

You should've heard what my late grandfather (born in 1903) had to say about Baby Boomers. It was the first time I heard several popular curse words. :grin2:

I personally know Millennials who aren't worth a squirt and are everything negative that is said about them. I also work with Millennials who are the hardest working, caring, and thoughtful people I've ever met. Vast generalizations based on one or even a few observations is faulty reasoning.
 

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I think a lot of millennials don't have life in full focus yet. How could they. As we older ones know, it takes years ! I think most of them have a good conscience, but it needs a little training. They will tell you us older ones have it all wrong, but I can overlook that. ...J.D.
 

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1956 Chevy Bel Air

I was 10 years old in 1970. My older brother bought a '56 Chevy (didn't tell the parents). He parked it down the alley and managed to keep it hidden for a couple of months. He only had a Learner's Permit, so there was a good reason for our clandestine activity (in our minds).

We had a lot of fun working on that car. We replaced the torn vinyl on the door interiors and had the interior looking great. Exterior was two-tone green and white; no rust. It had a 265ci V8 under the hood; transmission was a 'three on the tree' and the car was fun to drive.

Our subterfuge was thwarted by a family friend. Having seen my brother driving down the main drag the day before, the family friend said to our Mom, "I didn't know **** already had his license! I saw him driving down Norfolk Avenue yesterday!"

The conversation at dinner that night was tense, to say the least. My brother drove the car home. The parents tore the plug wires off the motor and informed us that the car would be sold. We got grounded for about a hundred years.
 

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I was 4 years old in Brooklyn NY. According to my mom, dad had left for the army a " sweet smiling kid" and returned from Vietnam pretty much completely nuts. The term PTSD hadn't been invented yet. Everything in our house got turned upside down, figuretively and literally. Our whole family spent the next 20 years trying to work that out and we are still dealing with it. Made for a traumatic childhood, I can tell you that much.
 
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