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Discussion Starter #1
Just talked to the New Orleans dealership. I wanted them to rejet my carbs for my Norman Hydes, as well as perform routine maintenance (like a scheduled service).

Jet kit: $90
Rejet: $190
Service (oil, plugs, etc) $250

Are these prices high compared with other dealerships. I was amazed at the $250 service fee. They stated that it included all supplies and tax, but come on.

I mentioned just changing the oil myself and they stated that they would perform other functions that I would most probably not do my self.

Another question, is that I wanted service performed, and was mostly concerned with the oil change because my bike has been sitting in a garage for the past year, with very infrequent starts. I had moved and did not have a chance until not to bring the bike.,

The bike is at 4500 miles, and up till now I have had a TX dealership service the bike. Is there anything I really need to worry about a bike sitting for that long? She starts and runs fine, I had stabil in the gas. Other than changing the oil, is there really anything that NEEDS to be done to protect her from damages? Im thinking of condensation problems, etc.

In other words, since the bike is not scheduled for service at this time (per the manual) is a total service actually needed?

Thanks.
 

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Were the carb bowls drained? If not, it might be worth cleaning the carbs before starting it up. An oil change is also a very good idea. And my BS-o-meter jumps pretty high at their "we'll do things you wouldn't." The most likely function they refer to is forgetting to put all the little hexagonal things with the spirally holes inside them back on the bike. Do it yourself.

I don't really know about the prices.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, before storing the bike, and every time after running it I would make sure the tank was topped off with stabilized gas and I would drain the carbs. I would return every couple of months to run the bike and make sure the battery remained charged.
. The bike is four years old now and is indeed time for a service visit, which is the cause for my hesitation in the first place. I am not a mechanic by any means, but I can change oil for sure.

I will need to talk to them about this more. HERE IS A LINK to the service schedule. It seems that at four years there is quite a bit to do. I will most likely bring this list to the dealership and ask if they intend on completing it. For the cost I specified, it may be an ok deal, being that I currently possess none of the supplies mentioned and the dealer stated that his cost included all supplies necessary.
 

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Don't let the butchers touch your bike!

Answer these questions:

1. Who has the most motivation to do a thorough, workman-like job of maintaining YOUR bike?
2. Can you read, write and speak the English language?
3. Is there a Sears store in your area?
4.Do you want to be at the mercy of the dealer, or would you like to know your machine a little better and acquire some new skills?

All B.S. aside, your best bet is to take all that money, buy a factory Triumph manual and some metric tools. A motorcycle lift is also a good idea, look at Harbor Freight or Northern Tool for a bargain. The only "supplies" that they are talking about are shop rags, and a shot of WD-40. If you perform only the 6000 mile service, the two "biggies" are changing the oil and filter, and changing the brake fluid(not listed, but required after two years, the fluid absorbs moisture and this raises the boiling point), the rest is simply inspecting the operating systems to see if they are OK. The manual will spell everything out in detail. You also have the members of this forum to lean on if you get into a bind. By the way, welcome to forum, you can PM me if you have any problems. There are others here that have more knowledge and may be able to help you better. The Bonneville and it's variants are really very simple to work on compared to other bikes. Just jump in with both feet; you'll be glad you did. Just go slowly at first and double check yourself. Good Luck.---James.
 

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We want to avoid boiling; raising the boiling point would be a good thing. Moisture lowers the boiling point of the brake fluid.

Yes, I'm a nit-picker. No, I can't help it. Or won't help it. Feel free to argue with me about that distinction. :D
 

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HiDesert, I stand humbly corrected.:bow::YellowWink: In my haste, I mis-spoke, and you were entirely correct to point this out. Moisture degrades the brake fluid by LOWERING the boiling temperature, thereby degrading brake performance. Still, the advice to change the old brake fluid is valid. I don't have the time or the inclination to argue with you, but instead wish You and Yours Happy Thanksgiving holiday.---James.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you all very kindly, especially you, Thruxton-TX, for the offer to pm for any help needed. I am going to do just as you all have suggested, as I recently acquired a service manual. I am not so sure that I am ready to rejet my bike, but the 6k maintenance should prove no threat.

Actually, before reading the replies, I had already decided to do the job myself, and had canceled my appointment, which was scheduled for last saturday (today is monday).

Thanks everyone.
It's really appreciated.
 
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