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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
(1–10)...10 being the most comfortable, what does the M-Bar come in at for comfort level? I want something in between stock and thrux, sport bar perhaps?

Thanks'
 

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M bar is a great bar but i would suggest puchasing taller aftermarket risers. i would say a 6 on the scale
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Here's the thing, I'm not feeling as safe on acceleration and cornering as I did on my sport bike. But my sport bike was too uncomfortable for long rides, 2-up riding, and it looked like a sneaker. I was hoping new handle bars would give me a little more feeling during aggressive riding. I know it won't be like the spot bike. Thoughts?
 

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9.
IMproves the handling markedly and is very comfortable. Your body leans forward and down, arching the back slightly - and the bike is more responsive.
But it is not equidistant between stock and Thrux.
It is a close brother to Thrux as opposed to being a distant cousin to stock.
Thrux is 26" in width - M I think are around 27 or 28".
For £30 - you cant go wrong so just buy them and experiment.
 

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Got LSL sport touring bars on my bike, they're just a tad too low (or too far forward) for me as I've got short arm reach. So now I shimmed them up 3/16" with washers below the clamps, figured it couldn't hurt.
Rode a buddies 69 BSA with M-bars, and they fit me just fine and felt much more comfortable than I'd expected. Probably b/c of more pullback.

Would also like to try some variant of the Superbike bars.

BTW, Have you seen the sticky handlebar thread?
 

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I fitted the M-bars to my Bonnie as I was having the same problem, I was used to a sports bike and the Bonnie was a little too upright and vague on the steering for my liking. The M-bars have made the steering better and made the riding position a little more agressive. The only problem I've found is that the footpegs on the Bonnie are not quite in the right place for the M-bars (it may just be me) and so your body is sort of curved in a C which isn't that comfortable. I keep fiddling with the bar position to make it more comfortable but haven't quite got it right for me yet. I have thought about putting rear-sets on to make the riding position a bit more sporty, but they're expensive. As I say the bars have dramatically improved the steering and handling and it may just be that I'm not used to the Bonnie riding position yet and I've not had it that long.
 

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I fitted the M-bars to my Bonnie as I was having the same problem, I was used to a sports bike and the Bonnie was a little too upright and vague on the steering for my liking. The M-bars have made the steering better and made the riding position a little more agressive. The only problem I've found is that the footpegs on the Bonnie are not quite in the right place for the M-bars (it may just be me) and so your body is sort of curved in a C which isn't that comfortable. I keep fiddling with the bar position to make it more comfortable but haven't quite got it right for me yet. I have thought about putting rear-sets on to make the riding position a bit more sporty, but they're expensive. As I say the bars have dramatically improved the steering and handling and it may just be that I'm not used to the Bonnie riding position yet and I've not had it that long.
Yep - that is what happens - and then you buy the Norman Hyde rearsets. And then you buy a Thruxton - which would give you a pair:D
 

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Sofiaspin is right. My personal opinion is the belt has to match the suspenders. :) If you go M bars, you need rearsets to unhinge the hips which are rotated too high in profile with the relatively forward and high stock bonnie foot peg position. I take a different approach but may not be for everybody which it clearly isn't as I like to experiment in riding position. Unlike many, I like the stock bars...but found the reach to the stock bars even a stretch with my long arms with long legs rotating my hips rearward due to stock peg position. I installed lowering pegs on my bonnie and now the reach to the stock bars is perfect. This in effect accomplishes the same end as rearsets with one noteable downside....lean angle. Lowered pegs would be on all motorcycles if it didn't compromise handling. It does. Most that want M bars tend to ride a bit more aggressive so lowering pegs may not be the right solution. If I went M bars, I would have to go rearsets. Instead, I like the factory handlebars with lowered pegs which helps my 34" pant inseam get my hips in the right position which btw has the residual benefit of taking a bit of pressure off my tailbone. Yes I do scrape the peg feelers on occasion but I ride on roads with intersecting dirt roads and honestly, these lowered pegs will likely save my bacon on not washing out by running too much lean angle through the twisties. :)
I have considered manufacturing lowering brackets for these bikes...perhaps in two different drops...1 and 2 inches depending on riding style and comfort needs. I may look into this, this forthcoming winter.
My thoughts,
George
 

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It's interesting that other people have a problem with the riding position, I did think that maybe it was just me. I have quite long legs so I think my hips must be at the wrong angle which is causing the problems. I also know I used to grip the tank with my thighs/knees on the SV650S and so alot of my body weight was held around the tank, I can't grip the tank on the Bonnie very easily and so I'm having to use different muscles to hold my body weight and use the foot controls. We've tried tilting the foot levers which helped a bit, but lowering the pegs sounds an interesting idea, I'm not a knee down rider ;) so it might be a way round the problem without having to resort to rear-sets which would put my knees down by the engine!
 

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Not too surprising Nick...depending on your body type and level of fussiness. Cyclists of all types are forever changing handlebars, seats and foot pegs. Rearsets aren't for everybody...again depends on the individual. If I was a track guy or even a mountain scratcher...only way to go is lower bar in front with rearsets. Adreneline will eradicate preoccupation with less than ideal ergos. ;)
But..for the regular Bonny guy that falls between a lay back cruiser guy with bad handling and a squid that has to knee drag, dropping the pegs down a bit is a good solution. Some and this would include me think the stock Bonny pegs are a bit high for the average rider in terms of what one needs for maximum lean angle...others will say not. Problem with moving pegs up and back is..yes you release your hips which can free up your torso to rotate forward, but many can't tolerate the acute femur to tibia angle of rearsets..which is aggravated with long legs. To me, riding a motorcycle like incidentally a racing bicycle...and cyclists like me are obsessed with fit because it translates to comfort and speed (related) is a large tradeoff. If you want to go fast, you have to get aggressive in your position on the bike which comes at some cost to comfort. Since I didn't drag my pegs in the stock position, they could come down and this freed up my hips to allow a more torso forward position or at least my torso wasn't being held up with my hips. The key is...and only trial and error will get you there because we are each different with different riding styles, you have to experiment to find the best tradeoff between comfort and speed.
So far dropping the pegs down 50mm works nicely for evening rides but a 25mm drop or so maybe the sweet spot for cruising and spirited forays through the twisties.
Cheers,
George
PS: A good cake and eat it too strategy which I may try at some point is 50mm dropped pegs + Thruxton rear shock height, i.e. 20mm higher. This not only restores half the lean angle lost by dropping the pegs but makes the bike turn in a bit easier negating the go straight tendency of the bigger 19" front wheel. Seat height is still acceptable when stopped as most do this if long legged anyway.
 

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Thruxton rear shocks are 25mm longer.
If you change them, you will change the geometry of the bike and the handling.
Same applies in reverse eg putting shorter rear shocks on the Thruxton, which is quite common.
 

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Thruxton rear shocks are 25mm longer.
If you change them, you will change the geometry of the bike and the handling.
Same applies in reverse eg putting shorter rear shocks on the Thruxton, which is quite common.
I am going to put a set of Thruxton shocks on my Bonneville because I like the feel of the Thruxton. Wonder if this will occur? Bought used ones so I won't be out many $ if it does not feel right.

Oh - M bar on a Bonneville rattle-can black:



 

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I am going to put a set of Thruxton shocks on my Bonneville because I like the feel of the Thruxton. Wonder if this will occur? Bought used ones so I won't be out many $ if it does not feel right.
Triumph warn against it but they would would'nt they - I rang them to get the official party line on inch lower shocks for the Thrux.

The bonnie rake is a degree more relaxed so it probably will not make too much difference - but you might want to get M bars to go with the riding position as Biker 7 says, lower pegs as I think you said you have long legs.

Anyway what do I know I cant make up my mind whether or not to put lower shocks on, lower the front end and buy the new LSL clubman seat - which would amount to around £650 to tweak what is a perfectly good bike until I screwed up be shaving an inch off the seat height and suffering locking in the kneees aaarrrrgghhh
 

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Some and this would include me think the stock Bonny pegs are a bit high for the average rider in terms of what one needs for maximum lean angle...others will say not.
For a quick and easy fix - try swapping your left and right peg! Costs nothing , except for a couple minutes.

It'll lower the pegs around 1", enough to notice. Looks a little stange with the feeler pegs facing forward though :)
 

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Check out Flanders; they have hundreds of options and detailed measurements so that you are likely to get the bar that fits you on the first try. Place your hands where you believe the most comfortable riding position is and measure difference from stock bars. Chances are that Flanders will have a bolt on set of bars and you won't have to hassle with risers. If you do change from stock bars I recommend some kind of vibration damping addition since aftermarket bars don't come with weights.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Some i'm thinking the SuperBar. Whts the deal with the stock weights can i use them if i get these bars from newbonneville?
 
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