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Discussion Starter #1
So, I took direction from DEcosse and lowered the wife's 2009 Speed Triple. She could ride it fine but found that in parking lot situations etc. it was not confidence inspiring on her tip toes. I started by buying the needed parts off Ebay; Sprint rotor, caliper, and caliper carrier. The Sprint rotor is larger than the Speed, and the caliper mounts on the top and allows the eccentric to be rotated 180 degrees to allow about an inch of extra lowering ability.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I started by flipping the pegs so I could jack the rear, removed the wheel and compared the parts. Next, remove the caliper and rear axle. Remove the brake rotor from the axle and install the larger Sprint rotor. This is a good time to service the rear SSS bearing, so go for it.
 

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Next re-assemble the rear and turn the eccentric so the axle is at the upper most position, install the Sprint caliper with new pads and bleed the brakes. This is the tricky part. I went through half a bottle of brake fluid trying to get the air out. Finally I realized that the sprint caliper sits a bit down in the front, which is where the bleeder screw is. To rectify this, simply remove the front bolt from the caliper mount, loosen the rear bolt slightly and tip the front of the caliper up. Bleed away and voila! Because the brake line is designed to go to the caliper on the bottom, there is extra line, you must put a loop in the line to get it to fit, but it is really not difficult and with a bit of trial and error it actually looks fine. Then re-install and torque the caliper bolts, mount the wheel and bobs your uncle.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It looks like I didn't get very much from this, but I think my measuring was skewed. It got me about 3/4" - 1" lower. I haven't ridden it yet as it was late when I got done. Pretty easy mod if you have a height issue. The caliper I bought was very low mileage and did not require rebuilding, I just flushed it out well with alcohol and installed new pads. Overall cost was about $220.00 US and took about three hours to complete. You could do it faster, but I was cleaning parts and servicing the rear bearing as well. I am hoping the larger rotor will result in a better rear brake. Test ride tomorrow and post up my results. Cheers!

Oh, and it did not require a shorter sidestand, but any lower and it would.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Not sure yet Norm, the wife is away for the weekend, so we'll see when she gets back. I'm sure it is perfect though.
 

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Remember to bring the forks up through the triples by about same amount - that will gain (lose) you a bit more but also restore the front/rear geometry
After that you may want to think about the side-stand - if it's too upright it really might be safer to take some out

Looks like you did nice photo doc - will have to check it out on the PC later
If the mrs says it was all worthwhile with a significant enough height loss, we'll stick this
We want to see pictures with her feet on the ground! :D

Oh - that brake should work a bit better too!
 

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I flipped the eccentric on my Sprint ST and it dropped about an inch. The bike sat too upright for my liking, but I was lucky enough to swap witha guy that bought an ST with a shortened sidestand, whch he did not need.

Mine was non ABS. IIRC, ABS-equipped Sprint could not do this.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yes, I am hopeful that the brake does work better. If it does, I may do this mod on my own Speed, leave the height where it is, but get the bigger rotor and top caliper install.

I just lowered the front and yes it's iffy on the sidestand. I will be shortening it. I have a welder living across the street, I'll just cut it, figure out the best length, grind it to there to get the angle right and then have him weld it back up, re-powdercoat black, done.

This was a fun little project, thanks Ken, for the required parts info.

The trickiest part was the bleed, (which I should have picked up on right away). Oh well.

That Sprint rotor certainly takes up more space in the rear wheel. :)
 

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Yes, I am hopeful that the brake does work better. If it does, I may do this mod on my own Speed, leave the height where it is, but get the bigger rotor and top caliper install.
I have the 1/2" Master Cylinder on mine - a lot less expensive, less work to install and is pretty effective improvement. So for just improving the brake, you might consider that route.
(For everyone else please don't turn this into a "why do you need your rear brake" debate)
Master from a 91-96 Kawasaki 750 - plus would advise a rebuild kit for a 20 yr old cylinder, if buying used!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yes, I had her sit on my SE first and then on hers. She had just returned from work and was in flip flops but it was exactly what she was looking for. Bikes are locked up as we are leaving on vacation tonight. She has not had a chance to ride it, or even take it out of the shop. When I get back I will take a pick of her on the SE and the 09 so we can see the difference the mod makes. It is a good inch. One thing I did notice though during the install; I had the 45 tooth sprocket on this bike but put the stocker back on. The 45 tooth kit came with a longer chain so the eccentric needed to be adjusted back some, putting it back on the downswing effectively raising the bike slightly. If I had the stock chain length, the bike would be lower. Just something to note.
 

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.. If I had the stock chain length, the bike would be lower. ...
Isn't that the opposite?
Because chain is longer (with the OEM sprocket) it would have to be adjusted further on the arc to take up the extra slack, so would actually make it lower?
Is that not right? It gets a bit confusing when you're not looking at it first-hand directly but I believe so?
And that is what you effectively did when putting the stock sprocket back on - you had to move the eccentric further up the arc to take up the slack.
So longer chain - regardless of the sprocket size (once the arc is reversed with the mod) is better.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Definitely it is better after the mod, no doubt about it. If you see my diagram below, you can see what I am talking about in relation to the chain length. The optimum lowering distance is achieved when the axle can be centered in the most vertical position. Any variation from vertical be it shorter chain or longer chain will result in a slightly increased ride height.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Well, I apologize for the tardiness on completing this thread. It is summer and vacations have been at the forefront of my agenda.

The project was a huge success. My wife and I have been on several bike trips since the mod, and she is absolutely thrilled with the outcome. It is the simple things, like backing the bike out of a slightly downhill parking space etc. where the extra shoe contact really shines. Here are a couple more pictures to clarify the outcome. The one shot she is sitting on my stock Speed, and the other she is sitting on her lowered version of the same bike.

No, she doesn't ride in flip flops! We figured it would best show the actual foot position as opposed to boots. As you can see, if she was wearing footwear with any sole thickness at all, her feet would be completely flat on the ground.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Here are a couple more pictures to maybe show a bit of difference. It is subtle, but if you look at the distance between the license plates to the tire you can see the difference.

Also a coupe shots to show the different look to the rear brake setup after the mod. The blue sliders are obviously the stock setup.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
I almost forgot. After lowering the front by moving the forks up in the trees, The sidestand was a little short for comfort, I cut about an inch out to compensate. It stood without the chop, but if someone so much as bumped into it in a lot it would be lying on it's side. Cheers! Terry

One final note; This was actually an enjoyable project as aside from the sidestand, there was no cutting or modifying required, it was a simple re & re modification. If you consider the price of the lowering blocks I have seen on the "Bay", they run around $300.00 - $350.00 and generally do not include bearings or seals etc. This project was a real bargain, and allowed me to use nothing but genuine Triumph parts. The other "free" bonus to this mod is that, yes indeed the rear brake functions notably better.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
That's a nice looking part. Did you need to buy new seals and bearings, or were you able to re-use the originals? The price is good too. I looked at one of those, but after thinking about the cost of bearings and seals etc. I opted to try DeCosse's suggestion. With the Soupy's at $200.00, if you can re-use the original bearings and seals, you wouldn't save much doing the Sprint swap, depending on your luck with the used parts. (but I needed an excuse to modify, modify, modify) so there you go!

The Sprint swap is really very good. After a season with the black 09 lowered, my wife loves it. Really was a great and simple mod.

I am surprised you could leave the side stand unaltered. I thought I could at first, but the slightest irregularity in the surface, and the lean angle was too iffy for comfort.
 
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