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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m looking for a replacement motor for my ‘06 T100 (865) and hoping some of you fine folks can point me in the right direction.
I see some on eBay between $800-$1200 but don’t know how much I can trust them. Was hoping someone on here might be in the know of a good motor for sale. I’m in Nashville, TN, and willing to make a day trip for pick up or have it shipped.
Any insight on what to look for, where to look, pricing guides, etc are much appreciated. This is my first (and hopefully only) time replacing a motor.
 

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If anything catastrophic has happened to an engine, you should be able to figure it out easily enough. The harder thing to deduce would be how well did the previous owner take care of the engine while he had it? If Pinwall has maintenance records for the engine they are selling, fantastic, but otherwise you're running the same risk that you would be had you gone through an ebay seller. Ebay also has a pretty solid buyer protection program. If the engine is not as advertised, then you can return it and the shipping, no small fee for an engine, will be on the seller. I doubt Pinwall is going to eat that cost for you.

I would go with ebay personally; find an engine with low miles. That shouldn't be too hard to do. Then, when the engine arrives, there are a few options. One could have a mechanic check it out and give it the all clear. Probably not a terrible way to go on a used, low mileage engine. One could also spend the time doing a little research on how to conduct a survey themselves. This would be more cost effective and one would learn something about their engine. The problems here are that you still can't really tell how well the engine had been treated.

This brings me to the third option, the one I would personally take: I would plan on rebuilding the engine if it has some miles on it. It's not terribly difficult to do. You would split the cases, change the main and transmission bearings, replace the piston rings, check the head out, inspect for any worn or damaged components then bolt it all back together the end result being that you have an engine which is practically new. It's already out of the bike, so why not spend a couple of weeks doing this, or if you feel that it's really beyond you, paying a mechanic to do it. I promise it's not as hard as it might initially seem.

Another thing to note, as far as I'm aware, the engines for all air cooled Bonneville's are the pretty close to the same. They fit in the same mounting points and are, as far as the frame is concerned, interchangeable. There is a difference in displacement, 790 vs 865, but even then they will still fit on the frame, the only difference being the pistons and the cams, and a few odds and ends of associated items. Fuel Injected and Carbed doesn't matter, that's all separate from the engine. So what I'm saying is you can cast a larger net for what you're looking for and possibly find an engine with lower miles and a better price than what you have already come across.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If anything catastrophic has happened to an engine, you should be able to figure it out easily enough. The harder thing to deduce would be how well did the previous owner take care of the engine while he had it? If Pinwall has maintenance records for the engine they are selling, fantastic, but otherwise you're running the same risk that you would be had you gone through an ebay seller. Ebay also has a pretty solid buyer protection program. If the engine is not as advertised, then you can return it and the shipping, no small fee for an engine, will be on the seller. I doubt Pinwall is going to eat that cost for you.

I would go with ebay personally; find an engine with low miles. That shouldn't be too hard to do. Then, when the engine arrives, there are a few options. One could have a mechanic check it out and give it the all clear. Probably not a terrible way to go on a used, low mileage engine. One could also spend the time doing a little research on how to conduct a survey themselves. This would be more cost effective and one would learn something about their engine. The problems here are that you still can't really tell how well the engine had been treated.

This brings me to the third option, the one I would personally take: I would plan on rebuilding the engine if it has some miles on it. It's not terribly difficult to do. You would split the cases, change the main and transmission bearings, replace the piston rings, check the head out, inspect for any worn or damaged components then bolt it all back together the end result being that you have an engine which is practically new. It's already out of the bike, so why not spend a couple of weeks doing this, or if you feel that it's really beyond you, paying a mechanic to do it. I promise it's not as hard as it might initially seem.

Another thing to note, as far as I'm aware, the engines for all air cooled Bonneville's are the pretty close to the same. They fit in the same mounting points and are, as far as the frame is concerned, interchangeable. There is a difference in displacement, 790 vs 865, but even then they will still fit on the frame, the only difference being the pistons and the cams, and a few odds and ends of associated items. Fuel Injected and Carbed doesn't matter, that's all separate from the engine. So what I'm saying is you can cast a larger net for what you're looking for and possibly find an engine with lower miles and a better price than what you have already come across.
Thank you for this information. I’m tempted to attempt the rebuild. Just not sure I have the time with a 4 yr old and 10 yr old. Was also wondering about the engine replacement. Will the newer, fuel-injected Bonneville motors (‘09 and newer) fit in the ‘06 frame?
 

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I'm almost certain they will. Someone may point out my error, but as far as I know, the engines for the entire air cooled line were always the same outer dimensions, with the 865's just having a larger bore size and different valve train. The only outer difference that I know of is the crank case breather which was revamped on the later engines to be removable without pulling the clutch cover.

Since you already have the carbs, you probably want to stick with them for the sake of simplicity, but converting to FI can certainly be done. I'm not 100% sure if the sensors are the same between the two engines though, so that could be problematic. But you would also need a new harness, speedo, ECU... it's a lot. Going the other way around (FI to carb) however is so simple that Bonneville performance does the change to break in their rebuilt engines all the time for a mere $500 added to the final price.

The engine doesn't care if it's fuel injected or carbureted; so long as it's getting fuel, air, and oil it will be happy. It won't take a ton of time to rebuild the engine, the biggest waste of time you will have will be waiting on parts to ship. Unfortunately, you won't know what you need until you have the engine open. This could go for any worn component, but I'm especially thinking of the rod and crank bearings; they're color coded and you will need to get inside to see what you have to replace them.

The big caveat on this one is that it won't take much time so long as you do your research beforehand and don't screw anything up. I'm talking about stripping casing bolts, damaging rods, buggering the timing chain (heh, guilty of that last one). I rebuilt my engine a few months ago and made some mistakes along the way. Had I been a little more thorough in my research, I would have been done far sooner. And if it makes you feel any better, I went into the project having never torn an engine apart before. I just put 1000 miles on the rebuilt engine and as far as I can tell, it seems like the project was ultimately a success.

If you decide to go through with it, I can give you some information on what you will need before hand as well as caution you on the pitfalls I underwent.
 

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Just did a quick search on the forums. The engine will bolt up. There may be an issue with the alternator rotor which provides the signal for the ignitor, but you could fit the one you currently have on the new crank and be good to go (not totally sure if this will be an issue, so do the research on it). You could also just swap the cranks, but that will make replacing the bearings a little more involved.

Just wondering, why are you replacing your engine?
 

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Never mind, I see you fried your oil pumps. I don't think that would have damaged your alternator though as there are no metal to metal moving parts on it, so you should be able to keep it if the EFI engine requires it.

All the above information I posted goes for rebuilding an engine that you bought used, if you are looking to rebuild the existing engine, that will be much more involved. You will need to inspect and measure every component, likely replace or regrind the crank, reline the cylinders and much much more... it can all be done but it would be a major job and I would probably not do it personally with used engines being as cheap as they are.

I would be far more inclined to pick up a used engine and rebuild it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm almost certain they will. Someone may point out my error, but as far as I know, the engines for the entire air cooled line were always the same outer dimensions, with the 865's just having a larger bore size and different valve train. The only outer difference that I know of is the crank case breather which was revamped on the later engines to be removable without pulling the clutch cover.

Since you already have the carbs, you probably want to stick with them for the sake of simplicity, but converting to FI can certainly be done. I'm not 100% sure if the sensors are the same between the two engines though, so that could be problematic. But you would also need a new harness, speedo, ECU... it's a lot. Going the other way around (FI to carb) however is so simple that Bonneville performance does the change to break in their rebuilt engines all the time for a mere $500 added to the final price.

The engine doesn't care if it's fuel injected or carbureted; so long as it's getting fuel, air, and oil it will be happy. It won't take a ton of time to rebuild the engine, the biggest waste of time you will have will be waiting on parts to ship. Unfortunately, you won't know what you need until you have the engine open. This could go for any worn component, but I'm especially thinking of the rod and crank bearings; they're color coded and you will need to get inside to see what you have to replace them.

The big caveat on this one is that it won't take much time so long as you do your research beforehand and don't screw anything up. I'm talking about stripping casing bolts, damaging rods, buggering the timing chain (heh, guilty of that last one). I rebuilt my engine a few months ago and made some mistakes along the way. Had I been a little more thorough in my research, I would have been done far sooner. And if it makes you feel any better, I went into the project having never torn an engine apart before. I just put 1000 miles on the rebuilt engine and as far as I can tell, it seems like the project was ultimately a success.

If you decide to go through with it, I can give you some information on what you will need before hand as well as caution you on the pitfalls I underwent.
I may take you up on your offer. Thanks again. I’ll let you know what I find and how it goes.
 

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EFI motors won't replace a carb'ed motor. Due to differences in the electric system. You'd have to replace the whole electric system and properly many other components.
 

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EFI motors won't replace a carb'ed motor. Due to differences in the electric system. You'd have to replace the whole electric system and properly many other components.
What are you referring to as the "whole electric system?" The engine doesn't know if it's being fed by a carb or injector. Perhaps the oil pressure sensor is different, but that's a minor part. The only major issue that would arise would potentially be the pickup sensor and the alternator rotor, both of which are likely salvageable from the original engine.
 

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This is a quote from a thread from someone who actually did the conversion (he's not the only one):

for a complete conversion you need:

flywheel, main wiring harness, carbs and coils
in the 2010 version you have to keep the stock tps, in other version you can keep it or change it, it doesn't matter!

the rest of the work is just unplug the old and plug the new, not too hard if you have just basical skill!
now the bike work like a charm, the 2010 engine have some hp more and with carbs installed i have to change my clutch springs, now it slip in first and second gear!
You've got the flywheel
You've got the harness
You've got the carbs
You've got the coils

By flywheel, I assume he means the alternator rotor. Pop it off the old crank and onto the new, then hook it all up.
 

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What are you referring to as the "whole electric system?" The engine doesn't know if it's being fed by a carb or injector. Perhaps the oil pressure sensor is different, but that's a minor part. The only major issue that would arise would potentially be the pickup sensor and the alternator rotor, both of which are likely salvageable from the original engine.
What about the ECU, the different tune that are needed ???
 

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What about the ECU, the different tune that are needed ???
That won't be needed in this case because, assuming the OP finds an EFI engine, he will be outfitting it to run with a carb setup. The carbs do the same thing that a tuned ECU with injectors do as far as the engine is concerned, both supply fuel.

If the OP were to use an engine from an EFI bike with the intention of turning his bike into an EFI bike, then you'd be right, he would need all of the extra components.

I think maybe the confusion is coming from using the term "EFI engine" and "carb engine." We should perhaps be saying "engine from an EFI bike" and "engine from a carbed bike." Despite a few trifling differences (rotor, breather, etc), the engine is just an engine, it doesn't care what's giving it fuel, just so long as it's getting it.
 

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I’m looking for a replacement motor for my ‘06 T100 (865) and hoping some of you fine folks can point me in the right direction.
I see some on eBay between $800-$1200 but don’t know how much I can trust them. Was hoping someone on here might be in the know of a good motor for sale. I’m in Nashville, TN, and willing to make a day trip for pick up or have it shipped.
Any insight on what to look for, where to look, pricing guides, etc are much appreciated. This is my first (and hopefully only) time replacing a motor.
Hey Danny,

Just wondering where you've taken this project. Very interested to hear updates.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hey Danny,

Just wondering where you've taken this project. Very interested to hear updates.
I appreciate the poke! I should have followed up sooner. I found a couple of options through Pinwall and ordered. They posted videos of the motor running, shifting through gears, etc. before it was disassembled and had a flat shipping rate. It was delivered within by carrier within a week. I will be starting install tomorrow.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I appreciate the poke! I should have followed up sooner. I found a couple of options through Pinwall and ordered. They posted videos of the motor running, shifting through gears, etc. before it was disassembled and had a flat shipping rate. It was delivered within by carrier within a week. I will be starting install tomorrow.
Hey Danny,

Just wondering where you've taken this project. Very interested to hear updates.
Also, as it turns out, the motor I ordered came off the same year ('06) and model (T100) with the same paint scheme (red and black) and with 25% fewer miles than my original motor. So, I feel like I am getting a heart transplant from a healthier twin brother (pun intended) separated at birth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Update: New (to me) motor installed and bike is back up in running: knees in the breeze! One thing I immediately noticed is that it doesn't have the same get-up-and-go as before. When I roll on, the RPMs will rev, but the bike doesn't accelerate at the same rate. It just feels a little sluggish. Previously, it would accelerate through the red line and I would have to hang on rolling through the gears. It just doesn't pack the same punch. Any thoughts?
A couple of other bits of info: 1. I did not adjust the jets at all; 2. I previously had a 19T sprocket on the front and I put the 18T on when I installed the new motor. Could either of these be contributing to the issue?
I can repost this in the Twin Technical Talk threads but thought I would include it hear since it follows on my motor replacement.
 
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