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Discussion Starter #1
Hi.
Just a question to you engineers out there, I have fixed the flywheel bolts on my 1970 T100 with Loctite 290 but noticed there is a stronger one numbered 270, do you think I should redo them with that? :nerd:
 

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I don't have all my 'stuff' here but the 290 (green) is used on set screws and other preassembled fasteners and is considered to be a medium to high strength product. Red is the high strength Loctite two part numbers I am aware of are 27100 & 27140. One is a small bottle and one is a small tube.



Your choice on the redo....... but I would


K
 

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If you look at this link below:
http://www.loctite.co.uk/uke/content_data/LOCT.C.G.final_english_version_genn_08.pdf
You will see that Loctite 290 is good for up to M8 (5/16"), and up to 150C, and a torque to 10 Nm.
Also 290 is rated at medium to high strength, but its main use is for pre-assembled components. (wicking).
You could ask them for advice, but I think 290 is the wrong choice for this application.

As you have already used 290, on balance I would leave it, as is.
Using high strength loctite is like using a sledge hammer to hit a panel pin into MDF.

In a T140 book, and 650's it says use 60-0524 Loctite for the flywheel bolts, whatever that is?
Funnily enough, BSA A65 only says tighten to the recommended torque figure.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thanks for replies, seems the more you look into Loctite the more confusing it becomes, never realised there were so many different types. :surprise:
 

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I'm not an engineer so in my mind I just tend to simplify loctite (or it's competitors) into there types: red, blue, and green:
Red - medium strength, what I use for most everything unless one of the others is specific called for.
Blue - high strength, perceived as 'permanent'. However, applying heat to the end of the bolt or nut will usually soften its enough to break it free. I only use this where specified.
Green - penetrating, more of an 'after the fact' locker, for bolts that have already been attached, but I'm leary of it's effectiveness for that but better than nothing. However it is quite good for sealing spokes when converting a rim to tubeless.
 

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Red - medium strength, what I use for most everything unless one of the others is specific called for.
Blue - high strength, perceived as 'permanent'. However, applying heat to the end of the bolt or nut will usually soften its enough to break it free. I only use this where specified.
Halfsheimers? ;) Got these reversed...
 
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I'm not an engineer so in my mind I just tend to simplify loctite (or it's competitors) into there types: red, blue, and green:
I'm not an engineer either just sell this stuff for a living. Actually there are four colors of Loctite Thread Lockers


1 Purple- Low Strength


2 Blue- Medium Strength


3 Red- High Strength


4 Green -Wicking Medium to High Strength


Both Red and Green require heat to release the fastener Information is available at www.henkel-adhesives.com


I think the number mentioned earlier,60-0524, was the Triumph part number for Loctite if you were to order it from them.


K
 

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Hi bikedog, This is very confusing indeed. Huge subject. Many products must be gotten online in US as normal stores may not stock them.

There are at least 2 kinds of blue 242 & 243. 243 is a little stronger & more oil resistant. It is considered medium strength.

John Healy recommends 243 for fly wheel bolts normal use. For racing use red 271 is recommended.

He also recommends red 271 for right end of main shaft nut.

Alternator rotor nut & clutch center nut blue 243.

I personally use 243 on case studs that go into oil space such as the 2 for cly. base. That keeps oil from wicking by threads.

In real life service the above have proven very good. I personally used 243 on flywheel bolt for sludge trap.

I have personal experience with removing loctited bolts from flywheel. You need to heat both head of bolt & crankshaft where threads are before removal. The bad part is it will leave flakey crust of old Loctite behind which will fall right into crank oilway.

Trust me on this, you'll have to take sludge trap out & clean all again. Then have another go at it.

Or... leave it as is. I'll let you research the Loctite web site & you can follow your best judgment on how to proceed.

But for sure I would not try to remove bolt cold at this time. Heat until spit just boils.

Other brands of thread lock products can be any color or number. I prefer genuine Loctite products due to they are known quality & type by number. Always go by number, not color.

Where is your country location? Please update. 271 shows not available in UK. (pg 11).

Here is link to product pages.
http://hybris.cms.henkel.com/medias/sys_master/root/h67/hca/9179859583006/Industrial-Product-Selector.pdf


Don
 

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Hi bikedog, This is very confusing indeed. Huge subject. Many products must be gotten online in US as normal stores may not stock them.

There are at least 2 kinds of blue 242 & 243. 243 is a little stronger & more oil resistant. It is considered medium strength.

John Healy recommends 243 for fly wheel bolts normal use. For racing use red 271 is recommended.

He also recommends red 271 for right end of main shaft nut.

Alternator rotor nut & clutch center nut blue 243.

I personally use 243 on case studs that go into oil space such as the 2 for cly. base. That keeps oil from wicking by threads.

In real life service the above have proven very good. I personally used 243 on flywheel bolt for sludge trap.

I have personal experience with removing loctited bolts from flywheel. You need to heat both head of bolt & crankshaft where threads are before removal. The bad part is it will leave flakey crust of old Loctite behind which will fall right into crank oilway.

Trust me on this, you'll have to take sludge trap out & clean all again. Then have another go at it.

Or... leave it as is. I'll let you research the Loctite web site & you can follow your best judgment on how to proceed.

But for sure I would not try to remove bolt cold at this time. Heat until spit just boils.

Other brands of thread lock products can be any color or number. I prefer genuine Loctite products due to they are known quality & type by number. Always go by number, not color.

Where is your country location? Please update. 271 shows not available in UK. (pg 11).

Here is link to product pages.
http://hybris.cms.henkel.com/medias/sys_master/root/h67/hca/9179859583006/Industrial-Product-Selector.pdf


Don

Technically all correct, I'm sure, but I'll stick to my simple color based approach. I've never had trouble with that approach. Also, all of the various brands I have used have kept to that same color scheme but of course there may be exceptions.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hi bikedog, This is very confusing indeed. Huge subject. Many products must be gotten online in US as normal stores may not stock them.

There are at least 2 kinds of blue 242 & 243. 243 is a little stronger & more oil resistant. It is considered medium strength.

John Healy recommends 243 for fly wheel bolts normal use. For racing use red 271 is recommended.

He also recommends red 271 for right end of main shaft nut.

Alternator rotor nut & clutch center nut blue 243.

I personally use 243 on case studs that go into oil space such as the 2 for cly. base. That keeps oil from wicking by threads.

In real life service the above have proven very good. I personally used 243 on flywheel bolt for sludge trap.

I have personal experience with removing loctited bolts from flywheel. You need to heat both head of bolt & crankshaft where threads are before removal. The bad part is it will leave flakey crust of old Loctite behind which will fall right into crank oilway.

Trust me on this, you'll have to take sludge trap out & clean all again. Then have another go at it.

Or... leave it as is. I'll let you research the Loctite web site & you can follow your best judgment on how to proceed.

But for sure I would not try to remove bolt cold at this time. Heat until spit just boils.

Other brands of thread lock products can be any color or number. I prefer genuine Loctite products due to they are known quality & type by number. Always go by number, not color.

Where is your country location? Please update. 271 shows not available in UK. (pg 11).

Here is link to product pages.
http://hybris.cms.henkel.com/medias/sys_master/root/h67/hca/9179859583006/Industrial-Product-Selector.pdf


Don
Thanks for that useful info, have not actually got any 271 just looked at a site selling Loctite. Think I should get some 243.
 

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Just so you are aware 242 & 243 are basically the same. I was told by our Loctite rep the 243 will be eventually be replacing the 242 series product..... but that was about eight years ago.:eek:


K
 

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One thing I've seen on Youtube videos from the UK is Loctite in stick. Looks really convenient but so far I've only found it stateside via Amazon.

One more thing - the first car engine I ever rebuilt was an old flathead six and there was no Loctite to be seen. The auto industry got along quite well for well over 50 years until it was developed from superglue in the '60s, and vehicles did not fall apart for lack of it. Loctite is not a necessity but adds another layer of security. Properly torqued fastenings shouldn't need it, but I suspect most torque settings published today assume it is used.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks again for all the replies, can always rely on this site when needing help :smile2:
 

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One thing I've seen on Youtube videos from the UK is Loctite in stick. Looks really convenient but so far I've only found it stateside via Amazon.

Should be easily obtainable even on the western frontier of Arizona:grin2:. Probably the biggest hold back is the cost.


Blue 37614 19gm or 37643 9gm tube

Red 37700 19gm or 37701 9gm tube


Green Hi-Temp Bearing Mount 39150 9gm tube


PST Pipe Sealant 37615 19gm tube


Copper Anti-Seize 37616 20gm tube


Silver Anti-Seize 37617 20gm tube

K
 

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Should be easily obtainable even on the western frontier of Arizona:grin2:. Probably the biggest hold back is the cost.


Blue 37614 19gm or 37643 9gm tube

Red 37700 19gm or 37701 9gm tube


Green Hi-Temp Bearing Mount 39150 9gm tube


PST Pipe Sealant 37615 19gm tube


Copper Anti-Seize 37616 20gm tube


Silver Anti-Seize 37617 20gm tube

K


Well you’d think so but I’ve been into most of the major likelihood’s and not found a stick! I have some of the copper but it came from Amazon.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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There are only four parts that you should use Loctite on a Triumph twin: Red on the three flywheel bolts (and heat should be applied to the sides of the crankshaft adjacent to the threads to remove. Failing this you risk breaking the bolt trying to remove it!!!!!!!!!!!!!), Blue on the main shaft kick starter and clutch nuts and rotor nut. There is nothing else that requires, or should you use Loctite on.

Green Loctite, or any Loctite, should not be used on any bearing. If the bearing is loose in the case Loctite WILL NOT secure it. The differential in coefficient of expansion between the aluminum case and the steel bearing breaks up the Loctite in short order. If the bearing has its normal interference fit, the green Loctite will reduce the internal clearance which can lead to bearing failure. Loctite should never bu used when fitting a new sleeve to a cylinder.

Other than the places mentioned above, the only other aids I use are ThreeBond #4 on aluminum to aluminum covers where their is no gasket, P-80 rubber lube for the push rod tube rubber and the 6 rebound rubbers and a name brand assembly lube. My gaskets are designed to be used dry!
Just saying :peepwall
J
 
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