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It's very weird !

Has a real sharp forks angle but won't turn in , the engine is held in by a large bolt just behind the steering stem

Erik Buell was an engineer but some of the things really make you scratch your head

Owned this bike the longest and find it the most intimidating !
Has issues that would bankrupt the make if warranties were fully taken up

It's a real love/hate bike and I ride it the least

If the belt breaks. it's £200 for replacement and you have to semi drop the engine out to fit it

Will I sell it...... NO LOL
 

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Beautiful bike. Tempted to get a Monster next. 821 is on the radar.
Delaware? Not sure where to send you. Looked on the dealer directory and Ferracci is no longer listed as a dealer, so I'm assuming he retired. YMMV but IMO these are not DIY bikes. Having owned 8 since 1973, am very fussy about the tech who does my valves and belts. Still have Donnie Unger for mine but you'd have to ask the knowledgeable on the DMF whom to trust. And bring your VISA. :)

Glad to have the last middleweight 2-valve, air/oil cooled before Euro 4 kicked in personally. If you like wheelies, the last 1100 EVO's might be fun if you can find one nearly stock. They don't really need much in the way of mods. 821 will be smoother as 4-valves usually are, but much more expensive to maintain and like working with fine jewelry.

Not for everyone but can be habit-forming... :D Set up properly, they go where you "think" them.
 

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Delaware? Not sure where to send you. Looked on the dealer directory and Ferracci is no longer listed as a dealer, so I'm assuming he retired. YMMV but IMO these are not DIY bikes. Having owned 8 since 1973, am very fussy about the tech who does my valves and belts. Still have Donnie Unger for mine but you'd have to ask the knowledgeable on the DMF whom to trust. And bring your VISA. :)

Glad to have the last middleweight 2-valve, air/oil cooled before Euro 4 kicked in personally. If you like wheelies, the last 1100 EVO's might be fun if you can find one nearly stock. They don't really need much in the way of mods. 821 will be smoother as 4-valves usually are, but much more expensive to maintain and like working with fine jewelry.

Not for everyone but can be habit-forming... :D Set up properly, they go where you "think" them.
DE is a weird sport for anything not Suzuki/Kawasaki/Honda. I have plenty of dealerships within 60-90 minutes away which I suppose could be worse. I’m not sure where to go for Ducati either, though a test ride may be in order soon none the less.

As beautiful as they already are, I can’t imagine many asthetic improvements. Not looking for wheelies but a nice step up that I’ll never outgrow would be nice. They’ve lengthened their maintenance schedule from what I understand to around every 10k or so which seems promising.
 

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As beautiful as they already are, I can’t imagine many asthetic improvements. Not looking for wheelies but a nice step up that I’ll never outgrow would be nice. They’ve lengthened their maintenance schedule from what I understand to around every 10k or so which seems promising.
10K vs 7.5K is 4-valve vs 2-valve. Frankly, once they settle, 2-valve don't need shims much if you run Redline 15W50 religiously. Costs a lot more to check 4-valves. Now if it were 20K and you had the SBK timing chain...

Belts are every 2 years technically. If you bounce off the red line a lot, probably required. If you visit there rarely, maybe less. The belts switched to Kevlar-reinforced a few years back, (red lettering). Gates thinks they might go ten years, but this is a stressful application.
 

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It's very weird !

Has a real sharp forks angle but won't turn in , the engine is held in by a large bolt just behind the steering stem

Erik Buell was an engineer but some of the things really make you scratch your head
He was forced to use the tractor engine. He's really something of a genius. Taught Harley what they needed to do to keep their rubber mounted crap from sending their riders into speed wobbles. Taught the entire motorcycle world the importance of mass centralization. Developed the underslung exhaust and perimeter rotor. Used the frame as an oil tank.
 

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He was forced to use the tractor engine. He's really something of a genius. Taught Harley what they needed to do to keep their rubber mounted crap from sending their riders into speed wobbles. Taught the entire motorcycle world the importance of mass centralization. Developed the underslung exhaust and perimeter rotor. Used the frame as an oil tank.
The frame was used as the fuel tank(not original) and the swingarm made by Brembro held the oil. When he left that idea on the new Helicon engine, he said the sloshing of the oil affected the rear behavior. Not so sure the perimeter rotor as being anything of note. They had problems with rotors warping. When braked hard on the track with the stock pads, the pads would melt. If the oil had been in the frame, certainly not original. Not dissing him, I liked what he tried to do. I'm not an engineer. Hard to re-invent the wheel. BMW has been better at introducing odd ball engineering than anyone.
 

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The frame was used as the fuel tank(not original) and the swingarm made by Brembro held the oil. When he left that idea on the new Helicon engine, he said the sloshing of the oil affected the rear behavior. Not so sure the perimeter rotor as being anything of note. They had problems with rotors warping. When braked hard on the track with the stock pads, the pads would melt. If the oil had been in the frame, certainly not original. Not dissing him, I liked what he tried to do. I'm not an engineer. Hard to re-invent the wheel. BMW has been better at introducing odd ball engineering than anyone.
Yeah, I was reaching back on the frame bit. Saw an old Yamaha dirtbike that stored its oil in a steel downtube frame. Kinda skinny, must not have used much oil.
You could register the same complaints at BMW. Their tele/paralever designs that I find work great on street bikes are not prefered by track riders.
 
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