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1999 Triumph Trophy 1200
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey everybody

I just have a question which the collective may(or may not) know the answer to

Does anyone know what happened to the last Triumph made at Meriden? Was there such a motorcycle? If so, is it with a private person or does Triumph have it?

I am just interested thats all. Hopefully its in a a museum somewhere

Cheers and thanks

Gary
 

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If anybody knows It is going to be someone active on this website, lots of really knowledgeable folks lurking here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thats exactly what I thought 👍👍

I am not a member of the Vintage Triumph Club, maybe someone who is knows the answer??
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ooops sorry cant spell lol I meant to say Meriden 😊
 

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When was the last Meriden style (non Hinkley) bike made?
 

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Does anyone know what happened to the last Triumph made at Meriden? Was there such a motorcycle? If so, is it with a private person or does Triumph have it?
Well, logically, OF COURSE there is a "last Triumph made at Meriden".

It's quite likely that it was either a TSS or a TSX, but I have NEVER seen anyone say it was one or the other, nor have I ever seen information regarding who owns the last one, or where it might be.

For all I know, I owned the last one; I had a TSS, but sold it along a few years ago...
 

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Chris Buckle and Roebuck Motorcycles were my local dealer, literally walking distance from where I lived.

They made it possible for me to keep my T140 going round the clock and more as my 'working' bike. Didnt have to mention year or model of bike when I went in there, he knew it as well as I did. The numberplate on my T140 is a Roebuck supplied one, with their name and phone number on the bottom of it, although my bike was originally sold by Slocombes.

Roebuck took out a dealership for Moto Guzzi after Meriden closed, I went to the opening day - I do remember drooling over a black and red 1000S in the window.

I last saw Chris when he was working for Colin Collins at Harrow, must have been 2002 ish - I took my T309 Trident in for servicing knowing that Chris would be looking after it.
 

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The last Meriden models were probably better performing and more reliable machines than the classics that came before them but they also lacked the classic lines and stylings of the classic beauties. I much prefer the modern Triumph (classics) of today over those years.
 

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Hi Dave,
Roebuck took out a dealership for Moto Guzzi after Meriden closed, I went to the opening day - I do remember drooling over a black and red 1000S in the window.
Ha! You and me both. :)

However, Chris carried on with Harris after Meriden closed, he took on the Guzzi dealership in the 1990's (the 1000S is 1992?) after Bloor's new sales director refused him a Hinckley dealership (having given it to Roger Etcell over at Harrow). Guzzi then shat on him by announcing they weren't going to launch any new models for three(?) years ... That's when he rented the showroom to a hairdresser and retreated to the basement to sell just spares for Meridens.

Regards,
 

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Why am I not surprised it's Erum who knows? He's in a few FB groups I'm in & appears to know everything ever about classic Triumphs. A very knowledgeable & helpful guy.
Very cool.

My TSS had to have been less than 238 bikes from the last one built! (I believe it was less than 100 from the end, actually)
 

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The last Meriden models were probably better performing and more reliable machines than the classics that came before them but they also lacked the classic lines and stylings of the classic beauties. I much prefer the modern Triumph (classics) of today over those years.
Perhaps the best came 79 onward. Several in our club, the Special truly is a fantastic machine.
 

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Although not assembled at Meriden I understood the last bikes made from components made there were actually put together by LF Harris (Intl) Ltd after Les Harris secured a five year license from John Bloor to continue making them in 1983. Once the parts cache that came with the deal started to run out he began small batch production of parts as needed since he also picked up most of the jigs, dies, and machine tools along with the all the engineering drawings. He elected not to renew the license when it came up for renewal in 1988.
Happy to be corrected if my understanding is wrong.
 

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Although not assembled at Meriden I understood the last bikes made from components made there were actually put together by L F Harris (Intl) Ltd after Les Harris secured a five year license from John Bloor to continue making them in 1983. Once the parts cache that came with the deal started to run out he started small batch production of parts as needed since he also picked up most of the jigs, dies, and machine tools along with the all the engineering drawings. He elected not to renew the license when it came up for renewal in 1988.
Happy to be corrected if my understanding is wrong.
That is my understanding of the story.
 

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Hi
Just before the New Hinkley Bonneville was released (1999), the army’s Royal Signals motorcycle display team (the white helmets) approached Triumph to see if they could supply replacement machines for their ageing Meriden Triumph Tigers.
Unfortunately the new Bonnevilles being rather heavy were not suitable for the off road display teams needs.
The army then approached LF Harris and he agreed to make one final batch of Meriden style Bonnevilles after production had ceased for 11 years.
These they used until 2017 when they were disbanded under the government of the days austerity cuts. The army would not let the team riders buy the bikes and they were auctioned off, so a 90 year tradition was destroyed.
The bikes occasionally come up for sale.

Wheel Land vehicle Tire Vehicle Motorcycle
 

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Hi
Just before the New Hinkley Bonneville was released (1999), the army’s Royal Signals motorcycle display team (the white helmets) approached Triumph to see if they could supply replacement machines for their ageing Meriden Triumph Tigers.
Unfortunately the new Bonnevilles being rather heavy were not suitable for the off road display teams needs.
The army then approached LF Harris and he agreed to make one final batch of Meriden style Bonnevilles after production had ceased for 11 years.
These they used until 2017 when they were disbanded under the government of the days austerity cuts. The army would not let the team riders buy the bikes and they were auctioned off, so a 90 year tradition was destroyed.
The bikes occasionally come up for sale.

View attachment 765376
Watched their displays and they were superb. These machines you speak of would be made with love.
 

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I believe you will find that part of the stipulation was that the bikes were assembled by the Royal Signals personnel themselves from Harris supplied parts. Th he bikes were heavily modified Tigers.
The last true production bikes were a batch of TSS Bonnevilles, 30 odd I think. subsequently a few prototypes and specials including the police -AV.
I have been told by several dealers of the time that after the factory closed, that they were able to go to the factory and buy half built bikes and the spares to finish them, which they did.
 
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