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Discussion Starter #1
Those of you not using a center stand, how do you do things like lube chain and change oil? I guess oil isn't that big of a deal, just a hassle. Can't use a swing arm stand with factory exhaust (that I can figure). t-214.
 

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So it clears underneath? Harbor Freight sells something similar
Yes, now I do have the cruiser variant of the twin family, but think the rails are the same.
The lift fits just past the rails and inside of the mufflers/headers. I paid less than the link I provided, it was just the first search to pop up.

edit: I have also used a strategically placed piece of 2x4 on occasion to make contact on recessed area when needed.
edit 2: came back to suggest what justalurker posted. I park in a wheel chock. makes parking & maintenance easier
 

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Done it a lot of different ways but for everyday maintenance I use the HF Wheel chock...
720718

Easy roll in and out then for oil and filter changes. then use a small bottle jack under a steel rod inserted across the center stand mounting holes to R&R rear wheel or to lube and adjust chain,

You can use a couple tie downs from handlebars to eye bolts if you like but the bike stands really firm without.

Costs about $62 USD and there's always 20% off coupons around.

EDIT: if the two included rubber feet slide on the garage floor use a couple button head allen bolts instead and set the stand with the button heads in the expansion groove in the garage floor.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Done it a lot of different ways but for everyday maintenance I use the HF Wheel chock...
View attachment 720718
Easy roll in and out then use a small bottle jack under a steel rod inserted across the center stand mounting holes.
You can use a couple tie downs from handlebars to eye bolts if you like but the bike stands really firm without.

Then it's EZ to R&R rear wheel, lube and adjust chain, and do an oil and filter change.

Costs about $62 USD and there's always 20% off coupons around.
does the wheel chock hold the bike upright alone? I do have a bottle jack.
 

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does the wheel chock hold the bike upright alone? I do have a bottle jack.
As my post said..."You can use a couple tie downs from handlebars to eye bolts if you like but the bike stands really firm without".

I've found this chock from HF holds the bike really stable once you get it adjusted for the wheel diameter.
 

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I use one of these Harbor Freight wheel cleaning stands. Roll the rear wheel onto the rollers, and turn the wheel while you spray the chain. I have picked up a center stand from Craig's recently, so haven't needed it since.

 

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I just got a wheel chock stand and it has its uses, but for chain lube and anything where I need to spin rear wheel (chain tension etc), I really love having the center stand. Just get one and you're good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Center stands are discontinued. I found some but doesn’t seem worth the cost. I am going to see if my floor jack will work with some wood. The wheel cleaning stand makes sense too, thanks. Never had a bike with a frame, just different.
 

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I have both of these. Can't get much cheaper than the above to raise the rear wheel for chain lubing, removing the rear wheel etc., and also allows access to change the oil and filter. For larger jobs and storage over the winter months I use the lift below. Raises the bike completely off the ground, and reasonably stable removing pressure on the suspension and tires. Adding anchor straps will give you all the stability needed. Great for servicing, fork, brake and power train work, as well as wiring and tuning, just about any other project.

 

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Center stands are discontinued. I found some but doesn’t seem worth the cost. I am going to see if my floor jack will work with some wood. The wheel cleaning stand makes sense too, thanks. Never had a bike with a frame, just different.
Wow didnt know that.
Seems I can get new, old stock parts like centerstands and just about every other part as newly made pattern or aftermarket parts for my 45 year old Norton but we have no such luxury for a 7 or 8 year old Bonneville!
Sad

EDIT:
Wait a minute: Norman Hyde and TecBike make aftermarket centerstands for Bonneville.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well, yeah. The TEC one every thread about it people had to cut it or fight with it in some manner. The Norman Hyde one is almost as expensive as stock. Which I was going to do until I got suggestions here that would save me a bunch of money. Still not sure.
 

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Mine is similar to @yrunvs's: $20 Bike Lift. You need to be careful on the height if you make one. Mine was perfect, but then I put on longer shocks and oversized tires, so now I need to put mine on a couple boards to get the height. Not a big deal, but I should make another one. That one works well on wife's mag-wheel Bonnie, almost too tall.

It's quick and easy to pop up the rear tires to service the chain. or the front wheel. Or pop up one end with the stand and pile blocks of wood under the other to get them both up.

720751
 

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I had originally fitted a Scottoiler, to continually lube the chain. However, not being massively mechanically minded, I couldn't get itnto operate properly (totally my fault and not the fault of the product). However, I recently realised I didn't need it.

I have changed the stock chain guard with a nice black anodized one from MAS. It has holes all along it. The chain lube I have has a long nozzle to focus the spray in tight spaces.

Therefore, when I get home, as long as it's not raining, I bust out the lube spray and spend a couple minutes going all along the chain (that's exposed) and spray. I found that doing this two days in a row meant I had lubed the entire chain and I didn't need to raise the rear wheel or anything.

I'm sure there will be some riders with decades of experience who may chastise me for this method, but it works for me. Not lube on the wheels or anywhere else I don't want it. Chain lubed and good to go.😁
 

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Seems like all bikes with tubed tires (tyres) need a center stand for emergency tire repairs. I mounted one on my Thruxton.
After doing one rear tire last season, in my garage, with full access to my tools etc., I will not be trying this again. Can't imagine anyone doing this on the roadside & carrying all the needed tools all the time.
 

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Mr. 99- It's not always real easy (and you could get by with laying your bike down on its side to remove the whee)l ,but fixing the tire on your own might be the only way you will get going again. Good luck! GWW
 

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Dealing with the chain was my dilemma, too. Used to have a small lift but got rid of that a couple of bikes ago, didn't think I'd need it again, ha! I was brainstorming how to make a cheap lift out of a scissors jack when I found a Triumph brand center stand on Ebay for $90! Problem solved.
 
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