Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of this month's Bike of the Month Challenge!

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,882 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read that one should never kick start their bike while it's on the side stand. This makes sense to me that you could be surprised to not be in neutral and the bike could fall. (Are there other good reasons?)

However, there are several videos on youtube showing owners doing just that.

The bike is leaning to the left, resting on the side stand. They are standing beside the bike on the right (not straddling or astride) with their left hand on the throttle and jumping through the kick-starter with their left foot.

This is ill advised, no?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
I've read that one should never kick start their bike while it's on the side stand. This makes sense to me that you could be surprised to not be in neutral and the bike could fall. (Are there other good reasons?)

However, there are several videos on youtube showing owners doing just that.

The bike is leaning to the left, resting on the side stand. They are standing beside the bike on the right (not straddling or astride) with their left hand on the throttle and jumping through the kick-starter with their left foot.

This is ill advised, no?
People say you could break the kick stand doing that, I usually kick it on the center stand. Today however I tried starting it while I was standing over the bike. Not that easy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
625 Posts
The side stand lug on vintage Triumphs is simply brazed in place. The 'Triumph Lean' (you've seen it ... the bikes that lean WAAAYY over) is caused by the lug tearing loose from the frame. This is caused in large part by starting the bike while it's leaning on the side stand.

I *DO* it sometimes (stand beside it and start it) but I at least lift the weight off of the stand while I do ...

I really don't like to start it on the center stand, either as mine has already been horribly bent once and I went through a lot of work and effort to fix it. (the 500 center stand is tubular ... mine seems to like to bend ... I suspect it is a reproduction and NOT genuine)

In other words ... you can start it on the side stand if you want ... but you really shouldn't ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
482 Posts
Up to '67 the side stand lug is weak, 1968 onwards they beefed up the lug supporting the stand as there were a lot of breakages. It's never a good idea to start using the side stand, it's just a parking stand, always stand astride and just kick it with purpose and hate, think of your boss whilst kicking!!!!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,731 Posts
I've never understood kicking it while on the side stand or center stand. I hold my bike upright, and then kick it to life.

Of course, my bike is set to fire no later than the second kick. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,847 Posts
looseparts
there are lots of dumb f**k's on you tube. Start you bike on the side stand the lug WILL brake off maaaybeee not today or tomorrrow. BUT it WILL break off eventually. Starting on the cstand will also result in a failure. Type of failure depends on the bike model. Also if you dont break the clutch plates free on a cold bike interesting things can happen in the trans.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,991 Posts
I've done that for the past 33 years on the same bike without issues with the stand.

If it wasn't for using, why would they put it there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
When I first got my 140 a month or so ago I kicked it while on the stand. I heard that was not a good idea, I got used to balancing the bike and learned to hold it upright. I do know this, I am 5'11" at about 13.5 stone,190 lbs. down from about 210, I am concerned I will not have enough a** to kick this thing over if I loose much more weight. However, we have a minor league baseball team here, the season starts next week, mass quantities of very cold beer in a plastic cup and hot dogs will end that concern.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,271 Posts
I have weighed 125 for most of my motorcycling life, only in the last 15 years has it crept up to 142-145.

I've NEVER had too much trouble kickstarting old bikes, once the fuel and spark issues were sorted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Hi
I am not a large person(130lbs)
I find Triumphs easy to kickstart
even the 750s. I have bad knees,
so often I stand next to the bike and
kick it with my right foot.
Jeri
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
601 Posts
It is all about where you start to kick the bike that makes it
easy or hard to do. If you place the bike into gear and then
back it up untill you hit resistance,(compression). Then take
the bike back out of gear, and now kick to start. It give you
a little momentium before you get to the next compression
stroke. Should be easier to start that way.

Me I just give it a kick and keep the welder ready.

Pookybear
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
It's the rude 'big fellow' that spots a Triumph and says 'wow, what a cool bike'> the next thing he does ,he plops his big arse on it, places his feet on the pegs and grabs the bars, all while the bike is on the prop stand. The owner spots him and yells'hey but#$%^& get off my bike."
Or the owner lets his chick sit on the back of it while he refuels or drinks beer. Then there is the 'cool' guy lays on top of the bike> acts like he's comfortable with his feet between the bars, his legs on top of the tank and his head laying on the rear seat propped under his jacket.
The damage is done,and the owner kicks it over while the side stands break and everyone says "Don't do that!"
I'm usually off the right side ,with the stand down. I take the weight of it by uprighting it,break plates; then find the 'right spot' on the engine stroke with right foot, pull the clutch in and have it parralel with the street. Balance bike with left hand;One swift kick or repeat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,847 Posts
Red1959
rarely have wiser words been spoken. I start my bikes as you describe 'cept I usually grab a handful of front brake also. Also if your going to sleep on the bike like the "cool guy" put it on the centerstand first. It's not that bad REALLY and you don't roll off.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,271 Posts
I start my bikes on the sidestand pretty often (not always), but I've long since perfected my technique which is focused on concentrating all my weight on the starter right at the optimum point of it's arc, leaning to the "off" side, so as not to put too much pressure on the sidestand; this usually results in me immediately kicking free of the starter and landing on that foot to support the bike.

Don't do it that way unless you get the physics right, or you WILL break the mounting.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top