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Discussion Starter #1
I am thinking about replacing al the fuel and vacuum lines on my 98 Trident and, whilst I am at it, stripping the carbs down and giving them an overhaul. It seems like a reasonable little winter project! Can you get a kit for the carbs, or is it a matter of finding the parts as seperate items? I am UK based, if that matters.

Enjoying my bike, it is a minter with only 12400 miles on it from new. I expect it has been sitting idele for periods over the past 10 years and, a lthough it runs well I think it could be a bit more willing. Any info about the kit or refurb generally would be appreciated.
 

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IF you feel you must strip the carbs best replace the airfilter at the same time.
To remove carbs and to replace them is challenging and painfull on the nuckles .
If you think they are gummed up you could try running the bike on
REDEX for a bit then draining the carbs to see if any muck comes out. It might save you a lot of hassle.
 

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If it runs fine then to perk it up a bit bung a 45 tooth rear sprocket on it...that adds willing ;-)

When was the last service done... & what was done ?

You could start by draining the float bowls and seeing what comes out..? is the inside of the tank rusty ?

Sometimes if the bike doesn't seem willing enough it could be a dragging rear brake (or front for that matter)...little things like plug condition and carb balance can make all the difference.
 

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I "went through" my Keihins after about 8 years and 44,000 miles when I rejetted. About all that I did was clean a silty deposit out of the bowls, increase the jet sizes to 125-120-125, drill the covers from over the fuel screws and turn them out about 2 1/2 turns, and serviced the air filter and balanced the carbs. The only other parts that I've given my fuel system is a throttle cable and a carburetor boot.

Where I live I've lowered my air filter service interval to 10,000 miles. I ride in dusty air a lot unlike our British friends who get to ride in wet air. The 26,000 service interval is just too long for a U.S. bike.
 

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I "went through" my Keihins after about 8 years and 44,000 miles when I rejetted. About all that I did was clean a silty deposit out of the bowls, increase the jet sizes to 125-120-125, drill the covers from over the fuel screws and turn them out about 2 1/2 turns, and serviced the air filter and balanced the carbs. The only other parts that I've given my fuel system is a throttle cable and a carburetor boot.

Where I live I've lowered my air filter service interval to 10,000 miles. I ride in dusty air a lot unlike our British friends who get to ride in wet air. The 26,000 service interval is just too long for a U.S. bike.
Lol...oh yeah the air is pretty wet here at the moment, just call me Noah !!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Perhaps a decent service might be all that is required. It has been serviced by a reputable dealer in the past, but at the milegae intervals, which did not ome up with any regularity as it has only done an average of 1000 miles a year from new (until I got it). I may be being a bit unfair on it as I ride my other bike one day and the triumph the next. As the other bike is an Aprilia, which is essentially a sports bike, the Triumph is always going to feel a bit less urgent, by comparison. It is not slow though!

I think the carbs might need balancing and I will try flushing them. I am not up for doing work for the sake of it and their are other things that I might fiddle with first - like the brakes. I intend to ride the bike to Spain next year so my thoughts are turning to preparing it for the trip. So much to think about - like luggage, seat comfort, brakes, scottolier etc, but there are a few winter months to do it...
 
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