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Discussion Starter #1
I rode in the cold weather for the first time yesterday, so I decided to throw on some winter gloves. Unfortunately, it completely threw off my finger dexterity to the point where I didn't feel confident operating the controls in the event of an emergency. I don't know if it's just a matter of getting used to or what. Does anyone else have this problem?


In the event that there really is no way around that problem, I considered Triumph's heated grips. I quickly decided they weren't for me and that they only keep your palms warm.

I then considered either heated gloves or winter gloves designed specifically for riding. I would imagine, however, I would still have the same dexterity issue.

Thoughts?
 

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The heated grips make a good difference, but yeah don't do it all on cold days.. I've been looking to get a set of handguards to block the wind. Most motorcycle winter gloves suck.. gloves marketed more towards snowmobiling are decent.
 

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Medium duty snowmobile gloves will keep your hands warm and still allow you to operate the switches and controls. They are wind and water proof and have gauntlet cuffs to prevent cold air from entering through your sleeves. They're also happy with heated grips. Don't go overboard with the full Arctic styles. Remember that your coldest day riding a motorcycle is likely to be warmer than your hottest day on a snowmobile.
 

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Try silk glove liners for a cheap, quick fix.

Also winter gloves with Thinsulate backs and plain or reduced insulation on the palms are available. These are mainly used with heated grips.

I use Oxford heated grips and am very happy with them.
 

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You'll get used to wearing thicker gloves. At first it feels a little disconcerting, but you'll adjust quickly enough to the added thickness. I wear Dainese Scout Gore-Tex gloves when the weather dips in the 40s (likely get into the high 30s with windchill, that's as low as I my fingertips will take it), and have no issues whatsoever with the controls, you build up a different muscle memory to compensate.
 

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- You can have the warmest gloves in the world, if they are too tight, you'll freeze your hands off.
- Good heated grips make a big difference (I like the Oxfords, they get much hotter than most OEM grips)
- Handguards can help deflect wind from the hands
- One of the reasons we freeze our hands and feet is that our body is reducing the blood flow to the extremities to protect vital organs. Keeping your core warm will help with keeping hands and feet warm (same applies to boots, if you have thick socks but boots are tight you'll freeze).
- Putting a rainsuit on top of your riding jacket will help not only cut down on the wind, but will help retain your body heat, therefore contributing to keeping extremities warmer.
- I bought a 10$ USB heating pad that I just insert inside my vest on the chest, and it does warm up nicely.
- The faster you go, the colder it feels. Sometimes just slowing down 10-20km/h can help.


I'm in Canada and ride down to around -5C, so had to learned quite a few of these earlier on hehe
 

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If your gloves are not windproof, you won't be warm. I use both Gerbing heated gloves and Oxford heated grips. I have small hands so I know what you mean about thicker gloves. Hippo Hands really do work with heated grips and thinner gloves. Looks weird, but fashion is not the point.
 

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Those who mentioned keeping your core warm are spot on, IMO. A heated vest will go along way to keeping your hands warmer in combination with heated grips and warmer gloves. I have an older version of Held's 2in1 gloves.

https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/held-twin-gore-tex-2-in-1-gloves

With the heated grips, I put all the insulation on the top of my hand. That allows more heat from the grips to get to my hands, and puts more insulation against the wind. Here's Anthony showing how the previous generation - one newer than what I have - work. The new 2in1 is the same.

 

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I too have cold hand issues. I've tried a number of winter gloves and found these to be the best for me. I also swear by heated grips and have found Symtec Heat Demons to work very well.
 

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Try silk glove liners for a cheap, quick fix.

Also winter gloves with Thinsulate backs and plain or reduced insulation on the palms are available. These are mainly used with heated grips.

I use Oxford heated grips and am very happy with them.
I tried heated liners last year under my winter gloves and they were wonderful
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Powerlet has a reference tool for this, but it doesn’t explicitly list the 765 Street Triple. From what I see it should be safe to run a jacket liner and gloves at the same time:

https://www.powerlet.com/shop-by-vehicle

As far as I know, the STR 765’s alternator puts out 476 watts peak.
Thanks for the link. I hope it's accurate. I just did some research on a new stator with installation, and it's $$$.
 

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Heated gloves are a godsend.
Get a temperature regulator as otherwise they'll be on Full Char setting.
I can now attest to that. I did a long ride (840 mi. over three days, two of them half day rides) on the 1290 over the weekend. It has heated grips but no handguards. Fortunately I found a pair of Gerbing heated gloves just before I left and fitted the wiring to the bike in the hotel parking lot. Three hours Friday in the low 40's F and three on Saturday in the mid 30's. My hands were fine (feet, not so much). Google how to run the wires through your jacket (along the back, use safety pins and duct tape to secure). I'll be wiring the Stripler next.
 
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