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I've just moved house and the garage has a very rough floor which is mostly concrete with stones and packed earth. The garage is slightly damp, but not too bad. I'm planning to have it renovated with a new floor etc.
In the meantime what would you suggest to keep the bike in good condition? Should it stand on some sort of mat and/or have a cover?
 

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I've just moved house and the garage has a very rough floor which is mostly concrete with stones and packed earth. The garage is slightly damp, but not too bad. I'm planning to have it renovated with a new floor etc.
In the meantime what would you suggest to keep the bike in good condition? Should it stand on some sort of mat and/or have a cover?
Just make sure the bike is stable and won't fall over... or there's always the living room.
 

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If the roof is OK then I would not fit a cover as this keeps the damp in rather than out. I know winter is a problem but open / air the garage any day it is dryer / warmer outside than in.
My brothers wife had a problem with him keeping his bike in the kitchen. He doesn't have a problem anymore, she left him.
 

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If the concrete is old and getting a bit crumbly you might lay a mat over it. The damp alkaline concrete can react over time with the tyres. It's not a problem if the bike is moving in an out, but left standing for months might see some reaction. It's a long shot but I've known riders who take it seriously if they are wintering their bike.

Heavy plastic from a builder's supply store is probably the cheapest.
 

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Pick up a hygrometer and put it in the garage.
Long as it's not higher than 60-65%, you should be ok. A dehumidifier would be an option, if not, then you'll need air circulation. Put a fan in, or open door regularly. Keep the bike polished, will help to.
 

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My I suggest, if you have to park there invest in a sheet of plywood to park it on. That should mitigate some of the moisture coming up from the floor. I always park mine in my workshop, but I cover them with a nylon breathable cover, not something that can trap the condensation. I wait to cover it until the engine is cold. As the engine cools and the surfaces drop below dewpoint, the moisture in the air can condense on the metal surfaces. ...J.D.
 

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I like WW's plywood idea.
And I'll just throw this out there; Some rat poison and a couple of mouse traps directly under the bike might be a good idea. They love making cozy homes in airboxes in the winter. And those tasty wires in our bikes? Yum!
 

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I ran a dehumidifier in my previous very damp garage. Of course I could only run it in the warm season. It helped keep it from becoming too nasty-humid in there.
 

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My I suggest, if you have to park there invest in a sheet of plywood to park it on. That should mitigate some of the moisture coming up from the floor. I always park mine in my workshop, but I cover them with a nylon breathable cover, not something that can trap the condensation. I wait to cover it until the engine is cold. As the engine cools and the surfaces drop below dewpoint, the moisture in the air can condense on the metal surfaces. ...J.D.

This^ and a plastic tarp over the plywood as a moisture barrier
 

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Plastic tarp over the plywood would be an improvement. But I would not put plastic over the bike itself. ...J.D.
 

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If the concrete is old and getting a bit crumbly you might lay a mat over it. The damp alkaline concrete can react over time with the tyres. It's not a problem if the bike is moving in an out, but left standing for months might see some reaction. It's a long shot but I've known riders who take it seriously if they are wintering their bike.

Heavy plastic from a builder's supply store is probably the cheapest.
I agree completely with the heavy duty plastic. It will cut off all moisture below the bike (if you’re just using in a single spot. And don’t forget, when you redo the floor completely cover the gravel with that heavy duty plastic and overlap the seams and pour the concrete directly on the plastic. You will never have a moisture problem again from your floor
 

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I spray mine with wd40 or mos2oil or similar, especially fork sliders and rear shocks, and all bare alloy.
 

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I would put the bike on a swing arm stand and front fork/ head lift stand. It’s good for the tires and keeping the suspension unloaded during storage. Using them in between rides isn’t too tough either. If the floor is real bad then maybe the plywood idea for stability and the stands over it.
 

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Sheet of plywood, sealed, no plastic on it. The tarp will trap moisture in the wood and make it rot. Probably too drafty for a dehumidifier, you'd waste time and money on one. Coat unpainted and chrome surfaces with a corrosion inhibitor. Keep the gas tank full with ethanol free gas during the coldest months while not ridden. Don't forget the battery tender, Bonnies hate low voltage.
 
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