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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The photos are the LH bearing housing on the rear conical hub of a
'72 650 Bonneville.

It easy to see that some clown has had a field day on this, and I could go on about what caused it, but that is not necessary for you to assist me in getting this repaired.

The photos show a fracture, commencing at the edge of the locking ring thread and across to one of the reinforcing ribs. The housing has spread, causing the thread to misalign, and thus the locking ring will not grip or tighten. The bearing has, understandably, started to turn on its outer ring because it too is no longer a press fit.

Solution? I thought if I clamped the hub , and with the thread realigned, tacked a very small weld to hold it. Then place the lock ring into place and weld the fracture complete. The hope is that the welding might also just shrink the area a little (if cooled reaonably quickly) and thus allow for the bearing to be refitted as a snug fit with some Loctite 242 on both bearing and lock ring.

Has anyone been there, done that? And for the metalurgists out there, can this hub section be shrunk back, given the beating its taken??

Trust someone can give me some confidence about a repair here!!

RR



 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you one and all for the replys. Deep down I knew a replacement was the go, guess I just wanted to avoid the hassle.

RR
 

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hey retro , if you can source a whole new replacement wheel you're good to go . if you don't/can't and are going to get a hub and relace DO NOT just rip things apart thinking you'll be able to just get it back together somehow .

there's several critical measurements you'll need to take along with pictures to guide you .

i'm not familiar with your particular wheel but i am with lacing wheels . you're going to have at least 2 different types of spokes , maybe 4 .

yes you need to replace that hub . so good luck in your hunting and get back to us :)

cheers , Woody
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hey Woody,

Thanks for the input. I've been around long enough to know that respoking and truing the wheel is no job for the rash amature. I doubt that I even want to try. The prospect of all the effort to replace the hub (sourcing one even) was underlying my vain hope that I could repair this one.

RR
 

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"I doubt that I even want to try."

ya you do and you know it . you own a vintage triumph , that automatically makes you a mechanic :)

get on ebay , go through your sources links and find one or a whole wheel .

it does take a lil finesse , but it isn't rocket science . if you get to that point just pm me and i'll give you my phone # .
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the encouragement Woody, It's a skill I would like to have, and I may well yet have to do it if the outsourcing costs are prohibitive. I did a lot of my own mechanical work when I was younger, but I have gotten lazy as I've aged.

The Triumph manual discourages amature wheel building, but as in the past, "necessity is the mother of invention".

The worst I can do is to pass on a wobbly wheel to the "expert" to fix (at premium rates!).

Perhaps this is just the thing to get me going again.

Thank you. RR
 

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You can do it Retro. Study up first. Helps to start with a hub and a rim that are round in the first place. Just take your time. Remember, you can always loosen the spokes and start over.
 

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Hey Retro,

I had no trouble finding complete wheel assemblys for my '72 TR-6 on Ebay last year. Got a rear one (complete with tire) for around $50

TD
 

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What GPZ said. But I wouldn't assume the wheel was laced with the correct offset in the first place. Do you know if this is a factory lace job? Did you happen to check the wheel alignment before you took it apart? I think I would try to reassemble it to the extent necessary to get an idea at least of how close to correct the offset is on the wheel now.

Wheel alignment is critical to good handling, and the harder you push when you ride the more important it is. But you have to make sure the rest of the chassis is straight and true too, with good bearings and bushes in the steering head, swing arm, forks and wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Good to hear from you all. Seems I night be able to avoid respoking. These hubs aren't just lying around everywher he in OZ. I have located a new hub and rim complete. Just add bearings and tyre and go. Not inexpensive at $407US, but it does overcome a number of obstacles for inexperienced me. Thank you. RR
 
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