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Lurked alot, but still at 47 I haven't aligned things until now for my first bike....

I have been looking at Triumphs the last several years, not really wanting to get the cliche' fringe and chrome at HD. I ran into two Triumph riders at a gun shop I'm in from time to time...and I really want one...I love their looks, especially the older bobbers and cafe bikes

Too late at 47 to start to ride?
 

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Wearing my Mr Know-it-all hat.....

I cringe when someone your age (or even way younger) says they're going to take up motorcycling. I ask them to get a little used 100cc dirt bike and spend about 100 hours running the hell out of it in the nearest field. When you can stand on the pegs and go through anything, when you can do donuts, drop it and get back on, use both brakes to compliment each other, even pop a wheelie, you'll begin to understand how to control the machine far better than taking some driving school (although I'd suggest doing that as well.)

You then might want to start out on a used 250 or something; riding around in your neighborhood at first. Stay way the hell away from big highways and rush hour traffic.

There's just a ton of things to be doing when riding. And watching for traffic is priority #1. So control of the machine should be second nature. Priority #2 is always knowing in a split second what evasive maneuver to take or where to ditch it. Far better to instinctively drive around a car than hitting the brakes and slamming into the rear of a car...for example.

I could go on but you get the idea.

Least anyone think I'm being discouraging; I don't mean to be. It's never to late to start. And so it's never to late to start having a passion to be the best at it. Every motorcyclist should have that passion.
 

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Sign up for a Motorcycle Safety Foundation basic course. You'll learn how to ride and more importantly how to think like a motorcyclist. Provided bikes are small and maneuverable plus you need buy only minimal gear.

It'll give you the introduction to start riding for real; but, be prepared for a serious addiction with little or no rehab.
 

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There's never a "late" time to learn. As others have suggested, take the MSF course, that's the ultimate learning experience. You can quickly learn things about riding from that course, I've taken it several times, and every time I learn something new.

Learning to ride a motorcycle is an exponential learning curve. You are always learning something at every point, sure in the beginning you will be learning the most, but you will always be learning something new when you ride. I ultimately started there in hopes to see if riding was for me, and I absolutely loved it and am where I am today because of it. It's an awesome way to start your riding career off, you meet awesome people who share the same passion, and share the same dream of riding. You quickly learn of how awesome the riding community is.

The MSF courses also offer more basic/intermediate/advanced riding classes down the road, so after the basics, you can continue to learn more, and hey if riding is not your thing, no shame, at least you took the class and tried it out.

Course if you do love riding, remember, Triumphs are best ;)
 

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I'm starting again at 50 after a 20yr hiatus, maturity and respect for the machine go a long way but I agree completely with the idea that the mind should be on the externals (other traffic, road conditions, etc,) and not on controlling the machine. I've actually been surprised at how quickly the riding feel has come back, just like riding a bike as they say.
 

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I started at 46. Having wanted to for long time but for some reason didn't. So I signed up for the MSF and bought a CBR250 that I put 6000 miles in over a year. The course was really helpful and some of the things I learned saved me in the street. A lot of crazy cagers in florida. I just bought a Tiger 800 last week. I'm so glad I rode the 250 for so long -- really! Yes I spent money on something I only owned for a year but as careful as I was, I can think of two times that would have ended bad if I was on the bigger bike. I wouldn't do it differently, there are many benefits to waiting for the Triumph.
 
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