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I did the MobilOne V Twin 20W50 thing yesterday, along with the Bosch 3000 filter.

Today, I stopped off at Walmart and purchased an inexpensive scissors jack. Put Bonnie on her center stand, slipped the jack under the frame, gave it a couple of cranks to lift the front tire off the ground, and pulled the front wheel. Took it, along with a new GT501 Dunlop and tube to Dougherty's shop for a mount and balance job. I'll pick it up tomorrow. Bob D. called and left a message .... wheel is ready to pick up. Don't you love shops that actually care?

Came home, and removed each fork tube, which means you remove the front fender also. This isn't as big a deal as I once thought it would be. After doing it a couple of times in the past, it's sort of like field-stripping an Army M14 rifle .... no big deal.

Changed the fork oil, and lowered the level from 140mm to 175mm below the top of the fork tube. Progressive suggests a range for fork oil level between 140mm (max) all the way down to 190mm below the top of the fork tube. We'll see how this does tomorrow, once I pick up and install the newly-mounted tire from Dougherty's.

The hardest part of this job is getting the fork caps back on the tubes. And I'm not a patient guy! A few curse words, and things were back together.

Since I had the fork tubes off the bike, I also installed a set of 'official' Triumph gaitors. Hard to tell without the front tire installed, but I think I'll like the looks of these vintage things.

BTW - whoever suggested warming the stock Triumph fork protectors under warm water ... thanks! They might not have been too hard to 'drift' off without heating them, but after hitting them with hot water in the kitchen sink, they practically fell off.

During all this unbolting and rebolting, I checked the brake pads .... fortunately they looked like they had approximately 50% left. Not bad!

So, now what's left to do next week is to check the valve clearance, and correct clearances where necessary.

Bonnie is nearly ready to go for another riding season. Love this little bike!

Bob





[ This message was edited by: ohiorider on 2007-05-10 22:31 ]
 

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Sounds like a good wrenching experience indeed. It's great when things go smoothly and puts you in a pleasing state of mind. I have to remember to ignore Murphy's Law the next time I work on the bike and hold positive thoughts.
 

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Murphy's law is one thing..
Have you ever heard of Macgregor's Maxim?
" Murphy was an optimist "
:cool:
G
 

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Hey Buckeye! I think a good day wrenching, like you described, can be just about as good as a good day riding. Course I like to spend more time riding than wrenching, but there are days when the garage beckons. And when it all goes well, ah, the gods are smiling. There is such a great feeling from doing it yourself too. Most of the time, I'd rather worry about what I screwed up than what the dealer screwed up. Another nice thing about wrenching can be the combination of a nice relaxed pace, radio on, maybe a brew or two, then just sitting there on the rolly stool looking over the finished job.
 
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