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Discussion Starter #1
Hello my name is Will. I'm 25 on on the verge of buying a 2006 Triumph Thruxton 900 in Caspian Blue from a family friend. This baby is mint with only 3,800 miles and it came with quite a few goodies (all either from Triumph or Newbonneville.com).

I'm an active member on a couple other forums; S2KI (Honda S2000 forum) as well as Kawiforums. I know it takes time to build trust on forums (if you can call it that considering this is the internet). I fully intend to be a contributing member on here and will be looking for some tips as I've never owned a Triumph or a fuel injected motorcycle (aside from my little Honda XR100).

I'm a sportbike guy and do follow Moto GP, World Superbike etc, but there is something very special about the whole Cafe scene. That's really the only other style I'm into, and soon enough I'll be part of it!!!!


Please feel free to jump in and give me some beginners tips. I only test rode this beautiful machine but haven't really gotten my hand on it to mess with it yet.

Since the seller included a whole lot of parts with the sale I'm gonna have a few aftermarket and OEM parts to sell all in either mint or new/unused condition including: D&D slip-ons, OEM mufflers, rear fender w/tail light, new bonneville tail light kit, etc
 

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Discussion Starter #4
my apologies I mean never owned a non fuel injected bike...I'm actually not looking forward to messing with the jets but it'll be something else to learn
 

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Welcome to the forum. Blue is such a nice colour. I often look down at my tank when I am riding and admire my blue tank :D
 

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You should be looking forward to messing with the jets :) Carburetors are wonderful pieces of machinery not appreciated by the impatient society of today. Like the carbs themselves, they take a little while to warm up to but once you do you'll love ever minute of them. Once you've done some work on them and know exactly how it all works, there is a bit of satisfaction in being able to understand and visualize the entire process of the bike instead of having this 'magical' electronic elf that chooses how and when to put fuel in your engine. It somehow makes that 3 minutes of warming up before you ride and occasional cold weather hard starts a comforting experience.
 
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