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This has been an interesting thread, and very thought-provoking. Personally, I don't get the whole 'brand loyalty' thing. I've owned bikes from most of the major manufacturers in my time (exceptions are Kawasaki and KTM, but there is plenty of time yet), and all of them had their good and bad points. I'm presently chairman of my local branch of the Triumph Owners' MCC, and I get a bit of stick from some members for not being 'passionate' enough about the brand, but to me Triumphs (and BMWs, and Harleys, and the rest) are only bikes that either do what you want or fail to do what you want. I've liked each of the Triumphs I have owned and have good memories of them all, but then I could say that about most of the bikes I have owned. Triumph make some great motorcycles and there's no shame in riding any of them, but that's about as far as I can go. I'm passionate about bikes, and about riding, but not so much about the name on the tank or the shape of the frame. Anyone on two wheels is a brother - from 50cc twist'n'goes to full-dress GoldWings.

But then I am not a 'club' person. I have always ridden mostly on my own, and in fact the TOMCC is the first bike club I have joined, so the whole tribal thing passes me by. I'd agree with triumpt120v above: the only Harley that appeals to me is the Sportster, but the Harley ownership/lifestyle thing puts me off. That, and the fact that riders of the big Harleys regard Sporties as 'entry level' or girls' bikes, and would probably get nearly as much derision at a meeting as a Jap four. No thanks; my life is too short for that.

Having said that, I have found individual HD riders to be fine, but this is in the UK, where there isn't the whole US Harley scene to deal with, and non-bikers don't immediately think bike = Harley. I live near Fishguard (ferry from UK to Ireland), so I see a lot of touring bikers on my travels. Two groups stand out as less than friendly - patch club HD riders who studiously ignore any other form of two-wheeled transport and snarl if you wave, and the LWR wannabees on big BMWs, in groups with matching BMW suits and all the Touratech gizmos, who also ignore any attempt at communication. Solo BMW riders seem fine.

Seems like some people just like to feel exclusive and better than the rest, and some choose to do this through the medium of motorcycles. I would imagine they are probably pr!cks in other areas of their lives too.
 

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= 1k words :)

As a side-note, an observation on people who wear sunglasses indoors:

1. Frustrated men who use them to stare at women's parts and think no-one notices

2. Old people with degenerative eye disease

3. People who want others to find them intimidating (applies to genuine badass persons and mild-mannered accountants equally)

4. Z-list celebrities who want people to think they are important enough to want to be anonymous in public but really crave the attention

5. D!cks

Not sure if this pic doesn't actually hit all 5 categories.
I've worn sunglasses indoors when I was hungover (once or twice). :eek:
 

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= 1k words :)

As a side-note, an observation on people who wear sunglasses indoors:

1. Frustrated men who use them to stare at women's parts and think no-one notices

2. Old people with degenerative eye disease

3. People who want others to find them intimidating (applies to genuine badass persons and mild-mannered accountants equally)

4. Z-list celebrities who want people to think they are important enough to want to be anonymous in public but really crave the attention

5. D!cks

Not sure if this pic doesn't actually hit all 5 categories.

6. Some people wear them on stage, as their eyes are sensitive to the bright lights used in stage and film productions.

7. Some people who have just come in from the outdoors, and simply forgot!:D
 

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I forgot to mention earlier that my stepfather actually rides Harleys as well as all of his friends (minus the Victory Dealer owners who ride everything). My folks' reaction to me buying a Triumph was supportive; in fact my mom said "you seemed like a British bike guy anyway". But the real kicker is, while I love all bikes, I've always felt specifically drawn to Triumphs. Then one day last year my mom plops down a picture of her around 21 years of age on the back of my real father's customized 1960's era Triumph 650. The hair on my neck stood up. My father passed away when I was 4 and I had no idea he even rode motorcycles, much less Triumphs.
 

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I'll chime in: while I love my Trident for a daily ride and have a serious want for a Tbird Storm, if I want to go a long way in comfort I break out my '80 Tour Glide. If I want to haul the grandsons, there's an XS1100SF with a sidecar. If I'm going to a local car/bike night, I have several BSAs to choose from. I worked in the motorcycle industry for years and have ridden scores of different bikes, from Derbis to Ducs, and they're ALL more fun than my Volvo!

Some H-D riders are arrogant A-holes, but that's certainly not all of them - and there is plenty of bad attitude to be found in the other brands. Snooty Beemer yuppies, hotshot 'Busa jockeys, ancient antique snobs and that guy who trades four times a year for whatever some magazine tester called "the greatest bike EVER" are equally abrasive.

Up on two wheels is the most important thing, unless it is on one of the No-Ped likkersickles. Feel free to hate those all you want!
 

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+1 on that Smaug... but that very same abrasive guy who trades 4 times a year is how I ended up with an awesome just barely broken in and nicely mod'd Thruxton. We need them to generate a good supply of just like new/used bikes. Now when he gets tired of his Ducati Monster...nahhhhh! :p
 

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all my friends (almost all of them) drive HD, mostly baggers. they all like their bike but they do have a lot of troubles. and they are not bad guys, they just love to ride just like us
 

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+1 on that Smaug... but that very same abrasive guy who trades 4 times a year is how I ended up with an awesome just barely broken in and nicely mod'd Thruxton. We need them to generate a good supply of just like new/used bikes. Now when he gets tired of his Ducati Monster...nahhhhh! :p
Not always a positive. These are the guys who do so few miles on their steeds that the average mileage expected of a secondhand bike is about 300 per year. It means that there are plenty of low-mileage bikes around, but those of us who actually use their bikes as transport get hit badly at sale time. A 6-year-old bike with 20k miles on is worth a lot less when there are bikes of a similar age with 3k.
 

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My Thruxton was maybe 3 or 4 months old with about 2000 miles and sitting right on the dealer floor. They gave me a great deal because I have a long history with them. Do you really expect I should have looked harder for an older bike with more miles?
 

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My thought about which motorcycle to own: Look at the faces of the riders of various brands. If they look like they are enjoying riding the machine it is probably a good one. If the rider looks unhappy, disdainful, sneering, or aloof then the motorcycle is probably not a fun bike to ride.
 

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My thought about which motorcycle to own: Look at the faces of the riders of various brands. If they look like they are enjoying riding the machine it is probably a good one. If the rider looks unhappy, disdainful, sneering, or aloof then the motorcycle is probably not a fun bike to ride.

Excellent point.

But think you need to totally disregard the 1%er wannabees and groupies. They are not riding for enjoyment or for sport, but for filling some sort of odd fantasy.

Everyone else... YES!:welldone


Bob
 

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Yeah, but how does that work if they're wearing a full-face helmet?
 

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My Thruxton was maybe 3 or 4 months old with about 2000 miles and sitting right on the dealer floor. They gave me a great deal because I have a long history with them. Do you really expect I should have looked harder for an older bike with more miles?
Of course not. That would not be sensible.
 
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