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Can someone talk me through the removal of the tank, fuel lines, etc, in order to install a chrome cam cover. I just got it in and there are no instructions with it. I did read in another threan that the 4 cover bolts are torqued to .10nm. My '08 T100 is one week old and it is just screaming to have that gray cam cover removed.
 

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Turn off the petrol petcock and remove the fuel outlet line from it.
Go to the other side of the tank and underneath you'll see the overflow/vent hose.
Pull it off.
Remove the seat then remove the two small bolts at the back end of the tank.
Now carefully lift and pull off the tank (if it has fuel in it, keep it horizontal).
Put the tank down on something soft (the sofa!)

I found it best to remove the ignition coil which is above the cover.
This gives a little more room.
Also bend slightly the carb cable "noodles" out of the way a little.

Now remove the 4 screws holding the cover on.
And remove the cover itself, being careful not to damage the seal.

At this stage do not drop anything into the open cam space!!

Take the seal off the cover and, with the aid of some gasket goo, stick it to the new cover.
Also remove the 4 rubber seals which sit under each cover bolt.

Now do everything in reverse to fit the cover.
Use more goo on the seal face and the bolt seals.
DO NOT overtighten the cover bolts.
Tighten them equally to 10Nm torque and no more!

Easy!!..................

V.
 

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Well,

The 10Nm value on the torque for the 4 bolts is CRITICAL. Do not overtighten those or you will strip the threads in the cam bearing caps. Repairable, but a bit of a PITA that you don't need.

Without wishing to talk diwn to you - if it is not somewhat obvious to you how to remove the seat and tank to get access to the cam cover, I strongly advise getting the workshop manual. Actually I advise that anyway - I ordered mine at the same time I ordered the bike, definitely a worthwhile referenec. Haynes, OEM or both - definitely worth having.

The basic procedure is:

Remove seat (two hex head screws under the seat at the rear)

Remove Tank :

1. Turn off petcock (assuming carb model here) pull off fuel line.
2. Remove two screws at rear of tank, under the seat.
3. Pull tank back to slide tank off of rubber bushings at the front of the tank.
4. Lift tank slightly, pull off vent hose from tank underneath right hand side.
5. Lift tank up and off, place well out of the way on something soft.

YOu now have enough clearance to get at cam cover.

Remove the 4 cam cover screws.

Lift cam cover up, shifting hoses and cables out of the way, clear all the mechanisms and slide cam cover out.

Carefuly remove gasket.

Clean sealing surface on cylinder head, don't drop anything in there.

Install gasket into cam cover, place in position carefully. INstall bolts, do not overtighten.

Should be good to go - reinstall tank and seat.

Good luck!

PS this thread is techy in nature, so I am moving it into twins tech talk. Cheers!

EDIT: Ventura types faster than I do!
 

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You should replace the 4 rubber seals that the bolts go through .That is what the bolts tighten againest .Once they get flated to much the cover will never get tight as it should be and will leak later.If you buy a new gasket and glue it place with weatherstrip glueit will be alot easyer to put on and you can R&R the cover many times with just replaceing the 4 rubber seals.Most leaks are due to those 4 seals not the gasket.The 4 bolts bottom out on the head when they are tighted down ,thats why they ring off if over tighten,most people dont think about that.The 4 seals are all that pushes down on the cover.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Cam Cover

Thanks for the tips.....one of you mentioned using a casket seal on the rubber gasket. Since its not really a gasket is that necessary. It just seems like the rubber seals itself...maybe a dumb question....tks all
 

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Gasket sealant is cheap. Anything worth doing is worth overdoing. You'd hate to have it leak when you're all done if you could have prevented it with $3 worth of sealant.
 

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valve cover

Make sure to replace the 4 rubber seals that go into the valve cover. The small cost ensures no leakage. That of course with the new gasket.
 

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....one of you mentioned using a casket seal on the rubber gasket. Since its not really a gasket is that necessary. It just seems like the rubber seals itself...maybe a dumb question....tks all

I guess a better term would be to use "sealing compond".
For what it costs, and if it helps in avoiding an annoying leak which means you have to do the job over again, then yes I'd say it is necessary.

But its probably more good practice than absolute necessity.
Belts and braces as they say!

One other factor is that it also helps to stick the seal onto the cover when you're replacing it, making the job a whole lot easier.

V.
 

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Cam cover won't move!

I've removed the four cam cover screws along with all the other stuff around the area. I've applied a bit of force, but nothing..
Removed quite a few cam covers of other bikes in the past without any problems.

Is there a trick for this particular bike (Bonnie '09 efi)?
 

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kgood, is that chrome cam cover made of metal or plastic under the chrome? (If metal, aluminum or steel?)

Always been curious about that.

From the comments you're hearing, you can tell there are lots of cam cover leaks on this bike. One of its few issues, and easy to fix by the methods described here.
 

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Having just replaced the gasket on mine a couple of weeks ago, the gasket goo is necessary for holding the gasket in place on the cover. It's a complex shape and difficult to have it stay in place without a little sticky goo.

I had some seepage from the gasket, so I replaced it. No more seepage!

As long as I had things disassembled, I put in a pair of iridium spark plugs -- seemed a lot of work to not include some kind of upgrade!

One question, though, under the tank I found an electrical connector that didn't seem to be in use -- anyone know what it's for?



 

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One question, though, under the tank I found an electrical connector that didn't seem to be in use -- anyone know what it's for?
I have already replied to the exact same question, by the same poster, on the thread on the link below, less than 10 days ago:

http://www.triumphrat.net/twins-technical-talk/197064-unused-electrical-connector-under-tank.html

Curiously enough my reply remains the same. It's for the carburettor vent valve connector used for purging the EVAP emission systems fitted to California bikes. It has two wires going to it: One Black and the other Green/red tracer. It's for the purge valve. Trust me. That's what it is, or do you need a second opinion? :)
 

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thanks to a quite a bit of force and not entirely without cursing, managed to remove the cover Killed the gasket though.. What the h... do they use to stick it?!
Well, no more excuses to install a new one then!
 

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kgood, is that chrome cam cover made of metal or plastic under the chrome? (If metal, aluminum or steel?)

Always been curious about that.

From the comments you're hearing, you can tell there are lots of cam cover leaks on this bike. One of its few issues, and easy to fix by the methods described here.
The cam cover is made of aluminum and chrome'd.

Plasma.
 
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