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Discussion Starter #1
OK, stupid question here....

I want to change the top caps of my forks to the TEC preload caps.
I dont have a jack to raise the front while on the center stand. Hoping I dont need to buy something that will only use once in a while that take up storage space

Anyway, I was wondering if it would be safe to take the cap off, one at a time, to just change the caps? or would the pressure from the weight of the bike cause the cap and oil to leak out when the cap is removed?

thanks
 

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The oil won't come out. The oil level should be 10cm or more below the top of the cap when fully compressed and the spring out. The spring will displace the oil up a bit, but it should not come flowing out. You'll have a fun time compressing the spring while turning he cap, though. Load the rear of the bike with enough weight to lift the front wheel up as much as possible. If you are going to be pushing and turning on the same time, please consider strapping the bike down for safety.
Don't forget to cut down the size of your spacer tube to account for the additional depth of the pre-load fork cap, or else you may end up with more pre-load than you planned. Best of luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
ah, I did not think of the screwing back in with the spring being compressed.

Might consider using the car jack to lift the front up then
 

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I'd suggest using a piece of wood between the jack and the underside of the engine so that you won't be jacking directly on the engine and to spread the force to both frame members. IIRC there are a couple of small brackets down there that are on either side of the catalytic converter that the small sheet of wood can contact - they are strong enough to take the weight of the bike. Yes, don't try to remove the caps with the front end loaded in any way, you could either damage the caps and/or yourself. Not sure if both sides of the bikes suspension are the same. On my '16 T120, they are not.
 

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Just a reminder, it'll make getting the old caps off easier if you loosen the top fork clamp bolts. You'll need a good torque wrench when nipping things back up.
 

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Just a reminder, it'll make getting the old caps off easier if you loosen the top fork clamp bolts. You'll need a good torque wrench when nipping things back up.
It won't only make it easier, this is absolutely necessary.

When screwing the caps back in:

Use a matching socket in your hand, press down gently and evenly, slowly turn CCW until thread "clicks"--you'll feel it--then start turning CW, maintaining the even downward pressure. If you encounter any resistance to turning, back out and start again. The fine aluminum threads are susceptible to cross-threading. (I suspect that my current caps are cross-threaded in spite of my best efforts, but I'm not removing them just to find out.)

Only tighten until the cap is snugged down. That's all it needs. The o-ring seals it, so there's no need to tighten it any further, at risk of damaging the threads and accomplishing nothing.
 

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That is solid advice and best be used exactly as described.
 

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That is solid advice and best be used exactly as described.
What Baltobonneville said about loosening the top triple clamp pinch bolts IS absolutely necessary...I forgot that! Absolutely necessary before attempting to remove the caps!
 

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Cross threading the caps on install happens all the time too. The backing up before going forward is a super good point. They are fine thread & they are aluminum and to make things even more interesting - their under load.
 

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Okitoki do you own your home and work in your garage? If so you might consider doing as I did.
I drilled into the cement and installed 1/2 inch threaded anchors deep enough to be flush with the surface and spaced about 16 inches apart. These are located in the floor roughly where the rear axle is when the bike is on the center stand and an equal amount to either side of center. Buy some 1/2 inch all thread rod to fit the anchors and cut 2 pieces about 10 inches long. You also need 2each 1/2 inch nuts and large area washers and about 3 feet of chain large enough to go over the 1/2 inch rod.
With the bike on the center stand and the rear wheel centered between the anchors place a rag over the rear wheel then feed the chain thru the wheel. Screw a piece of all thread rod into each anchor as deep as possible. Slide the end of the chain over 1 rod and secure with a nut and washer. Run the washer down the rod about half way. Now push the rear end of the bike down until the rear tire is on the floor. While holding the bike down pull the chain as tight as possible and put it over the remaining rod. Add the washer and nut and you are good to go. Storage of the parts to do this is a breeze.
I used this method to do front end maintenance on a Sprint ST, a 900 Thunderbird and a 1200 Trophy. I do it alone and it is rock solid.
If you have a newer home with a post tension slab floor you need to be sure you don’t drill into a cable.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
That's a good idea....

Might be my Christmas project
 

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Okitoki do you own your home and work in your garage? If so you might consider doing as I did.
I drilled into the cement and installed 1/2 inch threaded anchors deep enough to be flush with the surface and spaced about 16 inches apart. These are located in the floor roughly where the rear axle is when the bike is on the center stand and an equal amount to either side of center. Buy some 1/2 inch all thread rod to fit the anchors and cut 2 pieces about 10 inches long. You also need 2each 1/2 inch nuts and large area washers and about 3 feet of chain large enough to go over the 1/2 inch rod.
With the bike on the center stand and the rear wheel centered between the anchors place a rag over the rear wheel then feed the chain thru the wheel. Screw a piece of all thread rod into each anchor as deep as possible. Slide the end of the chain over 1 rod and secure with a nut and washer. Run the washer down the rod about half way. Now push the rear end of the bike down until the rear tire is on the floor. While holding the bike down pull the chain as tight as possible and put it over the remaining rod. Add the washer and nut and you are good to go. Storage of the parts to do this is a breeze.
I used this method to do front end maintenance on a Sprint ST, a 900 Thunderbird and a 1200 Trophy. I do it alone and it is rock solid.
If you have a newer home with a post tension slab floor you need to be sure you don’t drill into a cable.
Holy Sh!$. This also doubles as a hurricane anchor as well?
 
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