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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi its a bit bitter sweet I've just inherited a 1972 bonneville 649 from my dad who I only got in contact with 3 years ago and he sadly passed away from covid late last year and at the weekend I took delivery of his bonneville which was his favourite bike, it hasn't run for about 10 years and my dad was going to restore it when he retired so had brought all the parts needed to get it up and running although I'm still waiting for them as they are still clearing out his garage to find all the parts for the bike.

When the bike was put away I was in full working order and I want to fully restore it to working order just after some advice on where to start. The engine turns over ok on the kick start and I've brought myself the Haynes and workshop manual just trying to get an idea of where to start
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Many experienced and knowledgable peeps on this website will tell you, ditch the Haynes manual and pickup a copy of the factory workshop manual. The Haynes tome is full of errors and omissions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Many experienced and knowledgable peeps on this website will tell you, ditch the Haynes manual and pickup a copy of the factory workshop manual. The Haynes tome is full of errors and omissions.
Yeah I already discovered that. My mums husband already ordered one for me as a surprise and after reading through it. It does look allot more in depth and detailed
 

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How about posting some full shots of your new baby during the daylight hours, in focus, 360 (all sides), and in profile? The bike looks fairly complete as-is but its hard to tell with the photos you posted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
How about posting some full shots of your new baby during the daylight hours, in focus, 360 (all sides), and in profile? The bike looks fairly complete as-is but its hard to tell with the photos you posted.
I will do that in the morning
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Very sad about your dad.
I see the bike has some TT stickers, are you in the UK?
Yes on the outskirts of milton keynes. Dad had taken it and his bsa to the TT through the 80's up to 91 when he started using more modern bikes
 

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Sorry for your loss. I had a similar T120, same year but with the UK tank rather than the (more desirable in my view) US one you have. If you are planning on keeping it I would get a Boyer electronic ignition. I would also ditch the velocity stacks and put the original air cleaner back.
 

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Hi Daniel, thoughts are with you for the sad loss of your dad, it's good you have a connection through his machine and I'm sure he'd be pleased it's in your keeping. Classic bikes are a little like dogs I think. Though we like to think we own them, they are merely in our custody and reward us with how we treat and respect them.
There will be plenty of knowledgeable advice available here should you require it. I would first be tempted to simply check the machines fluids and ride-ability regarding safety and use it as it is until you have an impression of it's foibles before doing anything to it's character.
I'm sure you will find things along the line that are required, few machines are perfect or customized to suit each preference.
Best regards.
 

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It has been modified quite a lot. Out of respect, i would tidy it up and keep it as your dad enjoyed it. It will be happy in the UK without air filters. I have not used filters for many years. I would, and have an oil filter fitted on my 1971 bike. Plenty of knowledge here especially on the 650 twins. Regarding the Haynes book, it is useful as there are some sections that you can compare against other publications. I use a factory manual, a Clymer, a Haynes and a factory parts book and all are useful. i rarely have to read much out of them as i have worked on the same year T120r since 1978. I use them to check some figures. I can take it apart and refit all parts of the bike from previous experience. Looking forward to see some better pictures.

Welcome to this excellent forum Daniel.
 

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Our brotherly condolences on the passing of your Dad, he seems to be of the best sort, owning a nicely loved Triumph big twin.

Some have said to clean it up as a "sympathetic" restoration to the happiest state your Dad had it in, others may say to thoroughly refurbish or restore it, still others might go so far as to say it would make a great bobber/scrambler/whatever. There is no wrong advice in any of those options, it is entirely up to you. If it's an opinion poll, I vote sympathetic restoration as best remembered. (you can always change it up later)

As to getting it going, you won't miss any details if you breeze thru this: Waking the Sleeping Beast
Be aware some specifics refer to the triple, yours is the twin, so consult the shop manual.

You'll find no shortage of assistance, resources, and camaraderie here; so get on with it!
 

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I think dad was a bit of a sporting rider. He has made it lighter, easier breathing and has a catch tank on the engine breather so i assume it was ridden hard. Isle of Man sticker gives a good idea of how he was when younger. It has his DNA living in that bike. Get it running and enjoy what he built. I enjoyed a visit and ride around the Isle of Man TT course. Would be nice to put that bike around it again.. Take a break at the Joey Dunlop memorial and have a nice walk around Laxey. Good Italian restaurant in Laxey too. i went to Milton Keynes recently, to the Museum with the Enigma history.
 

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Thats a cool period machine, looks like your Dad seriously enjoyed it.

Something looks very wrong with the way the rear brake rod is fitted. Ideally it needs to be as straight as possible.
 

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That is standard fitting brake rod for a 72 model. Odd that it has part of another brake adjuster added for some reason.That bike has some very nice period parts fitted and i guess your Dad knew quite a bit about these bikes. It looks like a Hyde oil cooler is fitted. The Hyde part might be an oil Thermostat for the oil cooler. I cannot see the cooler though. It has an external oil filter. Strange position but that was his choice of location. Possibly fitted so it gets some air cooling.
The crankcases look to be from an older bike as the engine number is not on a raised pad. The engine breather added to the primary case might also confirm it is an earlier set of cases and it might even be a 650 engine. Rear shocks are fitted upside down. These gas shocks may be Hagon and can be fitted upside down although i prefer the other way up. Not sure if any advantages with that arrangement.
Look at the carbs and find the number as looking at the manifolds, i think maybe he has fitted 32mm Amals.
You may well have a very well tuned engine in that bike so more looking around needed by people here.
It is a well thought out bike having years of alterations carried out. That aluminium reverse cone megaphone will sound perfect.
Edit, i just noticed the Hyde oil cooler, it looks like a spring between the frame tubes at the front.
That is a magical bike.
 

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Agreed, lots of cool and well sought upgrades but seat looks atrocious to me, makes a bike look heavy and awkward instead of lean and light, how it should look like.
 

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Cases appear to be from a 68 TR6C. The spacer on the brake rod somewhat suggests that the linings are heavily worn, the kink in the rod means that some of the braking force applied at the pedal will be used up trying to straighten the rod.
 

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I'd be tempted to leave it how you're dad left it

Just get it safe and going and ride it

Its a bloody cool bike

Except for the seat but that's an easy fix

Sent from my SM-T510 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Cases appear to be from a 68 TR6C. The spacer on the brake rod somewhat suggests that the linings are heavily worn, the kink in the rod means that some of the braking force applied at the pedal will be used up trying to straighten the rod.
After doing some checking and talking to one of his friends you are correct the engine number does say it is from a 68 TR6C the original engine is still in his garage and his friend is unsure or can't remember why it was changed. But after his garage is cleared out i will be getting all the original parts and replacement parts for the bike. And after doing some investigating found images from the day he brought the bike and it looks like it was a ex uk police bike as when he brought the bike it had the police bike body still fitted
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