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Hey all,
So I picked up a 2021 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally Pro last Sunday. I did a few jaunts around town over the week, but nothing substantial. This past Saturday I got to get the bike out on it's first "real" ride-just a bit over 500 miles. A bit of background on where I am coming from; my other stabled bike is a 2000 Honda Goldwing SE.

Here are my quick thoughts:

I am new to adventure bikes, and know you can tour on these, but I got a bit saddle sore at about the 400 mile mark. No issues with any other discomfort aside from that; arms, shoulders, legs, and back felt great. Granted this isnt a rolling sofa like my 'wing, but breaks are/will be needed for any serious mileage (unless you are a trooper).

If I had to pick one word to describe the bike, it would be "nimble". Quicker than I expected, and you can get quite a lean angle in the corners. Slow speed maneuvers way easier on the Tiger than I expected. When I broke off my group, I stretched the Tigers legs a bit, and hit triple digits pretty easily.

Great fuel economy. My trip computer showed 47.5mpg (average speed about 65-80mph). Seems the fuel gauge takes a few minutes to register after filling up.

It was 50 degrees Fahrenheit, and was probably a bit under-dressed in a mesh jacket, so the heated grips and seat were very welcome, and work great.

I currently have no bags, so all I carried was a backpack on the tail (I immediately missed the storage on my Goldwing). But, already on course to fix that. Triumph Racks on order, and getting soft luggage once they arrive. I also have a Giant Loop Bar Bag on order.

Brakes are amazing.They grab fast.

Cruise control "shuts off" pretty rough when you even tap a brake.

Lights are amazing. Normal, high-beam, fog...all great visibility.

Quick shifter was fun, but I am used to using a clutch..so that's what I did majority of the ride. It does seem "clunky" when using the quick shift from 1 to 2 (also posts on here about that), so when I was playing with the QS, I only used to from 2 up.

I am loving the bike so far, and plan on putting many more miles on it, as well as a lot of accessories to suit my needs. I'll keep haunting the forums looking for input and ideas, and share what I got.

V/R
Ryan
 

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Tiger 900 GT
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To turn off the cruise control, roll the throttle forward from 0% (negative throttle) to gently release the cruise without the lurch. Grabbing the brake lever drops the fuel input to idle and can be surprising if you are not grabbing a big handful of brake to make an emergency stop / slow.

The dealer is supposed to warn you about brake lever vs negative throttle disengagement when they tell you about the safety systems.
 

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2017 Bobber & 2022 Tiger GT PRO
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Hey all,
So I picked up a 2021 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally Pro last Sunday. I did a few jaunts around town over the week, but nothing substantial. This past Saturday I got to get the bike out on it's first "real" ride-just a bit over 500 miles. A bit of background on where I am coming from; my other stabled bike is a 2000 Honda Goldwing SE.

Here are my quick thoughts:

I am new to adventure bikes, and know you can tour on these, but I got a bit saddle sore at about the 400 mile mark. No issues with any other discomfort aside from that; arms, shoulders, legs, and back felt great. Granted this isnt a rolling sofa like my 'wing, but breaks are/will be needed for any serious mileage (unless you are a trooper).

If I had to pick one word to describe the bike, it would be "nimble". Quicker than I expected, and you can get quite a lean angle in the corners. Slow speed maneuvers way easier on the Tiger than I expected. When I broke off my group, I stretched the Tigers legs a bit, and hit triple digits pretty easily.

Great fuel economy. My trip computer showed 47.5mpg (average speed about 65-80mph). Seems the fuel gauge takes a few minutes to register after filling up.

It was 50 degrees Fahrenheit, and was probably a bit under-dressed in a mesh jacket, so the heated grips and seat were very welcome, and work great.

I currently have no bags, so all I carried was a backpack on the tail (I immediately missed the storage on my Goldwing). But, already on course to fix that. Triumph Racks on order, and getting soft luggage once they arrive. I also have a Giant Loop Bar Bag on order.

Brakes are amazing.They grab fast.

Cruise control "shuts off" pretty rough when you even tap a brake.

Lights are amazing. Normal, high-beam, fog...all great visibility.

Quick shifter was fun, but I am used to using a clutch..so that's what I did majority of the ride. It does seem "clunky" when using the quick shift from 1 to 2 (also posts on here about that), so when I was playing with the QS, I only used to from 2 up.

I am loving the bike so far, and plan on putting many more miles on it, as well as a lot of accessories to suit my needs. I'll keep haunting the forums looking for input and ideas, and share what I got.

V/R
Ryan
Thanks for taking the time to write this initial impressions review. I’m in the market for a Tiger 900 GT Pro and this was very helpful.
 

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I've had a Tiger 900 GT Pro now for two weeks and have to echo your enthusiasm about the bike. I'd been riding Honda VFRs for 20 years and realized in my late 60s that my neck was no longer as nimble, so riding in traffic on the VFR was beginning to feel less comfortable. In 2017, I picked up a Honda NC700X and despite the modest power, really enjoyed the visibility and upright riding position. Unfortunately the NC is a machine built to a price, so the suspension, brakes and gearbox all felt quite inadequate compared to my four year-old VFR, and the wind protection at highway speeds was terrible. When the Africa Twin was upgraded in 2020, I ordered one, thinking it would have more juice, better brakes and a well-sorted suspension along with ABS and traction control. I discovered that while the 21" front might be just the ticket for off-road travel, the street riding was not even as enjoyable as it was on the 50hp NC700X. I sold the CRF-1100 after owning it for less than a year and kept the NC700 and the VFR. I started looking around for to find a cure to the NC's econo-bike ills and thought about both the BMW R850 GS and the Tiger 900. The test ride convinced me that the Tiger was the way to go and I've not been disappointed. It's very nimble in the twisties, the brakes are excellent and the electronics are light years ahead of the Africa Twin. This is not to say that the Africa Twin's controls are bad, but they're just not as intuitive as those on the Tiger. I haven't yet had the 500 mile day as you did, but I've never ridden any bike for that length of time that didn't leave me with a numb butt. However, after 500 miles in a car, I've got a numb brain, so I much prefer the motorcycle. Triumph did itself proud!
 

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I've had a Tiger 900 GT Pro now for two weeks and have to echo your enthusiasm about the bike. I'd been riding Honda VFRs for 20 years and realized in my late 60s that my neck was no longer as nimble, so riding in traffic on the VFR was beginning to feel less comfortable. In 2017, I picked up a Honda NC700X and despite the modest power, really enjoyed the visibility and upright riding position. Unfortunately the NC is a machine built to a price, so the suspension, brakes and gearbox all felt quite inadequate compared to my four year-old VFR, and the wind protection at highway speeds was terrible. When the Africa Twin was upgraded in 2020, I ordered one, thinking it would have more juice, better brakes and a well-sorted suspension along with ABS and traction control. I discovered that while the 21" front might be just the ticket for off-road travel, the street riding was not even as enjoyable as it was on the 50hp NC700X. I sold the CRF-1100 after owning it for less than a year and kept the NC700 and the VFR. I started looking around for to find a cure to the NC's econo-bike ills and thought about both the BMW R850 GS and the Tiger 900. The test ride convinced me that the Tiger was the way to go and I've not been disappointed. It's very nimble in the twisties, the brakes are excellent and the electronics are light years ahead of the Africa Twin. This is not to say that the Africa Twin's controls are bad, but they're just not as intuitive as those on the Tiger. I haven't yet had the 500 mile day as you did, but I've never ridden any bike for that length of time that didn't leave me with a numb butt. However, after 500 miles in a car, I've got a numb brain, so I much prefer the motorcycle. Triumph did itself proud!
I traded my 2017 Africa Twin DCT for the 900 Rally Pro and couldn't be happier. Difficult to really compare the two, but the Tiger feels significantly lighter, better made, and much better quality. The Honda was fine, but felt cheap. The biggest problem with the Honda was the weight - it felt like a tank and weighed pretty close to one too. I'm much happier with the Triumph. Its a great bike so far.
 

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Have to agree. I traded an Africa Twin Adventure Sport DCT for a Rally Pro. The ATAS felt very big & heavy and I never really gelled with the DCT, especially when trying to do low speed manoeuvres eg, U turns, although I thought the quality of the paintwork etc on the Honda was very good.
The Rally Pro feels so much more manageable & nimble, and the quality of the components & equipment is very good. Have had mine for 18 months now & still very happy with it.
 

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Mcmu7280, Maxply, how do you like the engine compared with the AT / ATAS? How the engine pulls from down low RPMS?
I had a 2019 ATAS which I sold and ordered a 900 RP (not yet arrived) and the main reasons why I did not like the ATAS was weight (very heavy with protection and luggage racks) + how the lack of responsiveness from the engine until 5000 RPMS.
 

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Mcmu7280, Maxply, how do you like the engine compared with the AT / ATAS? How the engine pulls from down low RPMS?
I had a 2019 ATAS which I sold and ordered a 900 RP (not yet arrived) and the main reasons why I did not like the ATAS was weight (very heavy with protection and luggage racks) + how the lack of responsiveness from the engine until 5000 RPMS.
When I test rode the 900, I was immediately struck by how torquey the motor felt from low rpms and this gives it quite a relaxed feel to the ride, but it will certainly get a move on when you want it to. I think it feels more sporty compared to the ATAS, although I can't recall feeling that the ATAS was unresponsive, but the added weight of the bike & the DCT was a big factor in the way the bike felt.
 

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I second that. The Triumph feels absolutely light compared to the AT. Both bikes produced about the same HP and torque, but the Triumph seems to use it better - probably because of the weight difference, steering geometry, etc. The AT had a relatively smooth engine at highway speed, but lugged around like a single at slow speed. The DCT never seemed to pick the right gear, so I always ended up in manual anyway. It was fun flicking up through the gearbox with the trigger, but outside of that I'd much rather have a clutch. Overall, I'm happier with the Triumph. I especially like how easy it is to work on. The AT was a nightmare - too much plastic and always overlapping. It was an all day job just running an accessory outlet. Never again!
 

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"I especially like how easy it is to work on. The AT was a nightmare - too much plastic and always overlapping. It was an all day job just running an accessory outlet. Never again!"

Thats the truth...!!!
PLUS ++....tubeless tires and cruise control...!!!
Had a 2019 AT standard DCT.
 
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