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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone ever dealt with importing a Triumph into Japan? I am told that the brakes have to be tested to register the motorcycle, but a letter from the manufacturer that states the brakes pass all Japanese limitations will make this test not required. I have had no luck trying to find contact info on the Triumph website.
I have an 09 S3 (American spec) that I would like to register early next year. Any help would be appreciated.

-Spinnacak
 

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Dana Gould was the actual person that came up with your quote. If you are him, howdy, if not don't take credit for other people's work.

Jesus.
 

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Dana Gould was the actual person that came up with your quote. If you are him, howdy, if not don't take credit for other people's work.

Jesus.

Hi Jesus.
He didn't quote anyone, nor took any credit. He asked a question.


As far as getting the brakes tested, I can't see it being a big deal, although I am no expert, but if the bike passed various EU and US qualifications for brakes, I don't see how japan would be any different.
 

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Hi Jesus.
He didn't quote anyone, nor took any credit. He asked a question.
You need to look at the bottom of his post.

"We all enter this world in the same way: naked; screaming; soaked in blood. But if you live your life right, that kind of thing doesn't have to stop there." - me

That is a quote that's not his, and he's taking credit for it.

That's what Jesus is referring to.
 

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You need to look at the bottom of his post.

"We all enter this world in the same way: naked; screaming; soaked in blood. But if you live your life right, that kind of thing doesn't have to stop there." - me

That is a quote that's not his, and he's taking credit for it.

That's what Jesus is referring to.
OH, I hardly ever read the sigs. Thanks for clearing that up
 

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Discussion Starter #6
who cares

Thanks for the info Jesus. I'm sure that the Japanese Customs and Vehicle Registration Dept would be glad to know who said that quote.

Please read below for the REAL purpose of this thread.

"According to the Government of Japan, all imported motorcycles made after 01 Jul, 1999, must have a New Japanese Standard Brake System Certificate (250cc and below not required). If you have an ECE mark label or a WVTA label on the motorcycle, it may not require having the paperwork from the motorcycle company. If neither label is present, you must compare the serial numbers from the lists posted below [not attached] before registering your motorcycle to see if your motorcycle is exempt from having the certificate. If your serial number or motorcycle company is not listed here, please contact your motorcycle company before registering here." - as stated on a website and NOT a Jewish comedian (GFYMM)
 

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I took my 01 Bonne to Japan in late 01 and had to wait three months for the brake safety certificate from the UK before I could register it. Unfortunately the Japanese laws have tightened even further but it all depends on the year of the bike.
Before a certain month in 99 you won't need either the brake or emmisions certificate.
Check out this forum in Okinawa as they have a whole section on importing a bike. It will be cheaper if you're in the mainland and upwards of $3k if you're in Oki.
ggok.com
I'd show you a shot of my original brake cert letter from Triumph but it's at home and Im not.

Edit - If I read your info right your S3 is an 09 and as far as the guys currently in Oki say it will have to be inspected in mainland (this is a change from when I last left Japan in 05. Its a good thing Im taking my 95 Daytona when I go back in a few months!
 

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Too bad you just bought a new bike. It might have been more fun to pick up a Japan-only or non-US available Japanese bike. Maybe the new Honda streetfighter - then bring it back to the US. (Which is likely a huge PITA.)

FWIW - I lived in Tokyo for two years, so believe when I say, whatever you do, where ever you ride - be friggin careful. Roads are narrower and the traffic flow in some cities can be damn confusing. My friend got nailed going through an intersection inTokyo, totalled his bike and would up in a Japanese hospital for over a month.

Oh, and there are speed cameras everywhere and speed traps in areas but you generally won't get pulled over by a Japanese cop if you are moving fast on a highway. They don't see the point in trying to chase you. Happy travels!
 

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Back in the early 90s the JPs in Naha had nets they would stretch across the road to catch bikes... mainly against the bosozuka though. They also had long white sticks with a weighted red end and if you didn't pull over for a traffic stop (speed trap or driving in the bus lane) they would crack your windshield.
Okinawa is a little unique as we occupied it for so long. The roads are fairly wide so its easy to lane split. The biggest issue is waiting for pappasan to pull ever so nonchalantly out in front of you or mamasan to stop in the lane and then turn left. Max speed limit on the rock (excluding the one expressway) is 35kph.

I also forgot to add in both my posts....
LEAVE IT BONE STOCK!!! If you can't then at least have the OEM parts to put back on the bike. You will need to do this every time you have to pass a Japanese Compulsory Inspection (JCI). It's very difficult to find a shop that will just "inspect it" for a case of beer or some extra yen. A few things you'll most likely have to change are the front headlight (US bulbs point down/away when on low beam... into traffic in Japan as you're on the left side of the road) and the speedo has to have kmp scale.
 

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Back in the early 90s the JPs in Naha had nets they would stretch across the road to catch bikes... mainly against the bosozuka though. They also had long white sticks with a weighted red end and if you didn't pull over for a traffic stop (speed trap or driving in the bus lane) they would crack your windshield.
Okinawa is a little unique as we occupied it for so long. The roads are fairly wide so its easy to lane split. The biggest issue is waiting for pappasan to pull ever so nonchalantly out in front of you or mamasan to stop in the lane and then turn left. Max speed limit on the rock (excluding the one expressway) is 35kph.

I also forgot to add in both my posts....
LEAVE IT BONE STOCK!!! If you can't then at least have the OEM parts to put back on the bike. You will need to do this every time you have to pass a Japanese Compulsory Inspection (JCI). It's very difficult to find a shop that will just "inspect it" for a case of beer or some extra yen. A few things you'll most likely have to change are the front headlight (US bulbs point down/away when on low beam... into traffic in Japan as you're on the left side of the road) and the speedo has to have kmp scale.
Are you saying you can't even put a slip-on exhaust on the bike and pass rego?
 

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Are you saying you can't even put a slip-on exhaust on the bike and pass rego?
That has been my experience.
I'll caveat it with I'm not Japanese so I have a distinct disadvantage when it comes to interpetation of their laws. I do know most of the Japanese riders mainy perform non-visible modifications and/or keep their OEM stuff for JCI.

A friend of mine bought a brand new Harley and two years later when JCI was due, he FAILED! Nothing had been modified on the bike. It seems whoever measured it the first time varied from the next inspector (they literally pull out a tape measure and eyeball the lengthm height, and width). He had to go back to the Japanes transportation office and pay to retitle the bike (with the new measurements), then get it reinspected to pass. Many things can cause you to fail the JCI.

My 95 Daytona 1200 is modified and I'll try to pass JCI when my bike gets there as is. I like testing the system sometime! (That and I do have all the OEM stuff to put back on if necessary)
 

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That has been my experience.
I'll caveat it with I'm not Japanese so I have a distinct disadvantage when it comes to interpetation of their laws. I do know most of the Japanese riders mainy perform non-visible modifications and/or keep their OEM stuff for JCI.

A friend of mine bought a brand new Harley and two years later when JCI was due, he FAILED! Nothing had been modified on the bike. It seems whoever measured it the first time varied from the next inspector (they literally pull out a tape measure and eyeball the lengthm height, and width). He had to go back to the Japanes transportation office and pay to retitle the bike (with the new measurements), then get it reinspected to pass. Many things can cause you to fail the JCI.

My 95 Daytona 1200 is modified and I'll try to pass JCI when my bike gets there as is. I like testing the system sometime! (That and I do have all the OEM stuff to put back on if necessary)
That is crazy cause here in Australia there is a brake test with a few other trivial tests. There isn't even a noise test at most places.
 
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