Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,032 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just installed my B-C igniter module this weekend and had a heck of a time getting the bike to start up (drained the batt). It was pretty cold outside when I did the install (couldn't wait...runny nose and all) and the battery required a jump before the bike fired.
Anything I should be aware of with these, like having to re-adjust the air fuel mixture screw...smelled like it ran a bit rich? Only took the Bonnie out for a short ride of less than 20 miles, got gas and had to have my daughter come and give me a jump at the gas station. Once I got the bike home...no problems, it fired up every time. Kinda weird seeing the Tach needle past the south side of 8000.
The battery is less than a year old and I got new sparkplug cables and nology coil. Any thoughts?

Shorty
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,995 Posts
You wont need to make any carb adjustment's due to the install of the ignitor. Probably smelled a bit rich due to spinning it so much w/out starting, loaded up with fuel.

I havent had any issue's like this with my unit, I'm sure you probably did this but make certain all your connection's are tight, and that your tps hasnt somehow gotten unplugged.

I have heard of people getting bad ignitors but I thought this was a thing of the past.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,472 Posts
Initially this was a problem they were having with the first ProCom igniters. They later discovered that the igniters "designed" for the 865 worked better in the 790,
or.................
the igniters thought to work in the standard Black 790's worked with the Thruxtons
or.........
the bike fired up easily when cold, but wouldn't start later on down the road when it was warmed.....
and.....
well, it was all rather confusing, and supposedly all sorted out.
AND I WAS STUPID ENOUGH TO TAKE A CHANCE AT ONE.
But mine worked, and 23,000 miles later..... is still working (in a 790 Black).

- However -
There was ONE occasion (maybe two) when I had difficulty starting my bike too. The first time I wrote it off to having cleaned my bike with bunches of water, and the second time was with my current bike.... I wrote it off to poor jetting or some'n.

I unplugged my igniter and smeared that dia'some'n grease on the contacts, and was VERY careful plugging it back in. Try that, put your battery on a Tender for a slow charge, and if the bike doesn't start easily with no throttle and choke pulled all the way out..... presume that it might be your jetting and NOT the igniter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
505 Posts
I just posted a thread about mine last week. Bike was very hard to start hot, and I sent it back to Procom. They were very nice about it and are replacing it. I suggest you call their CA number and ask for Sales. Don't E mail the enginmeering dept- it goes to China and some idiot replies in non english that they no can help you. Seems like about 50% of them don't work from researching these archives
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,787 Posts
"I unplugged my igniter and smeared that dia'some'n grease on the contacts, "

Sigh.....one more time.......do NOT use dielectric grease on anything which you want to conduct electricity. A dielectric is an INSULATOR, not what you want on contacts which are supposed to CONDUCT. You want CONDUCTIVE grease, the white stuff between power transistors and heat sinks. It conducts both heat and electricity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Dood, I've had dielectric grease on my ignitor connections for two and a half months, about 3000 miles worth. No problems or hiccups whatsoever to speak of. Same with spark plug leads and coil connections, and battery terminal connections.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,515 Posts
Dielectric grease is an insulator, it's true. Isn't the idea behind using it that the grease gets forced out of the actual metal-to-metal contact points and forms an insulator around them, thus preventing moisture entry and corrosion?

So it's really more of a protective coating than a conduction enhancer. If you put enough in, you might interfere with conduction. OTOH, that would be a buttload.

Anyway, I don't use the stuff. Everything seems fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,472 Posts
I don't know any better. I simply read the wisdom of those who do and come to my own conclusion.

I was told that the reason headlamp bulbs, indicator lights, and the tail lights "burn out" so easily, is because of the arcing that goes on between the contact areas. WITH the dielectric grease between the surface areas, a better more consistent conduction is established between the contact points, reducing (if not eliminating) any arcing.

Oddly enough, since I began keeping the stuff around (and using it), I have fewer bulbs freaking out on me. And as coincidence would have it, the "burned out" PIAA in the FZ1 I bought used recently had contacts dry as a bone when I took it out. Could it be because it was absent any 'conduction enhancer'?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,588 Posts
Sorry Shorty, I'm a pessimist--they began with problems...marketed them with problems...did the microsoft thing of letting the consumer test for flaws. I wouldn't hesitate to ask for a replacement or my money back. If it's HARD starting cold and HARD starting hot, what else is left?

Good luck,
Larry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,032 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Appreciate the feedback guys. Maybe this weekend, weather permitting, I'll get a chance to play with it a little more (I hate intermittent problems). Meanwhile I e-mailed the Mfg to see what they have to say.

Regards,
Shorty

PS: Pat, I'm with you on the dielectric grease. If it's good on Phantom F-4's it's good enough for my Bonnie :-D . I would think that conductive grease could create a current path between the pins on the plug assembly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,609 Posts
After reading this thread, I went to the web (where else) and began searching for whatever I could find about dielectric and conductive greases. I'm still not certain, since I couldn't find a sites that discussed the merits of each type of grease. One site, dedicated to waterproofing wiring on Jeeps, presumably off-roaders, recommended dielectric grease because it filled in areas in connectors that would over time corrode due to condensation and moisture. The author also mentioned not using conductive grease on multi-pin connectors, since the conductive properties of the grease, which he claimed contain metallic silver particles (for conductivity), could cause 'cross-over' between the pins.

I have not yet found any info posted by a company who mfg'd both types of grease who had posted info on 'where to use' each. I'll continue to search.

Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,032 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
If I'm not mistaken, non conducting grease is used on my wife's Toyota Camry computer diagnostics plug in the engine compartment to keep the moisture out.
If you guys are looking for a good insulating / protective spray, I would recommend LPS3 which we use in the Aviation industry. Goes on wet but dries to a waxy film like chain wax. I used it and sprayed all the relays, battery terminals, and all other connectors (including the igniter). I also use it on exposed frame hardware and have yet to see any signs of rust on any bolts.

Shorty
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,032 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Just a quick update on the original problem with the igniter.
Got a phone call from Jason at British-Customs who stated that they have experienced this problem with (3) other units of various years of manufacture and both engine displacements and can't honestly say what the problem is because they don't know.
He offered an exchange, a Procom unit or my money back, no problem (I didn't even ask). I told him that I will play with it a little more to see if it's not some other problem that's causing this.
As far as I'm concerned, that's pretty good customer service because I really wasn't expecting a phone call. It seems that these units with the 3 degree advance after 2500 RPM are not Procoms like some of us thought.
Maybe this weekend I'll get a chance to play with it a little more.

Shorty
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,073 Posts
As for dielectric grease, I've been using it on my spark plugs and wires on both of my cars without any problems.

It is also on the connection for my headlight on the Bonnie and its been working fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,787 Posts
Keep the contacts clean and grease the connection AFTER assy. For real waterproofing, use raw lanolin. I used it extensively in marine hydraulic and engine applications. Stinks and collects dust. But it will keep the underlying part corrosion free. There are more convenient substances available and I believe LPS 3 is almost as good. Pull the connector apart, slip on a short length of shrink tubing, assemble and then spray, then shrink the tube.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
873 Posts
Awright I can't stand it gotta chime in.

First British Customs, Jason & Matt are excellent folks, I'd take him up on the offer for a replacement. I've personally seen a new Proc-Comm unit installed that wouldn't fire, the same time another one was installed and worked just fine & as far as I know is still working.

Second. Dialectic Grease.

I've used it for more than 30 years as an insulator and moisture barrier in electrical connections & it does just that! Works Great.

I also used LPS products on my Antique Airplane & they work really well too.

The last thing you want to do is use a "conductor" on multi-pin plugs... them little computer chips are expensive !
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top