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Hey everyone

A while ago I was working on the bike and I have been thinking ever since that I think I've stuffed it. I had a nervous breakdown a couple years ago so I tend to try and forget stuff that's bad; this happened probably about 9-10 months ago and I haven't rode or done anything to the bike since. Anyways, here is the problem:

I removed the exhaust decompression stuff. That went fine, but I had to remove a spark plug to turn the motor over so I could get to all the decompression parts. When I reinstalled the spark plug, I think I stripped the thread.

Anyone who has seen a removed head; will an insert work?

I really don't want to spend over $2000 on parts to get this fixed, but right now that's what I think is coming.... What annoys me is that while I can't remember for sure, I'm almost certain that I was using a torque wrench set at the correct setting, so this should not have happened...

Keen to hear what others think.

Sent from my LM-V500 using Tapatalk
 

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10 months is a long time. Take a deep breath, get out the torque wrench, and check it again. You may be concerned about nothing.
 

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It is fixable but why worry bout a problem that might not exist? Pull the plug out and try it again. It can't hurt as if the thread is tripped then it won't make it worse. If it is not stripped then refit it and rest easy.
 

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When an aluminum thread begins to get rough and gall, it usually continues to get worse until it either strips or binds and locks up.
When removing a plug for the first time, I coat the plug threads lightly with aluminum anti-seize compound(just a light smear, no blobs). Then I'm careful that I start the plug thread into the hole smoothly without cross-threading. The plug should spin in easily with your fingers. When encountering resistance, I use light clockwise pressure with the wrench with just a fraction of a turn, then back out counter-clockwise, then repeat the process again and again reforming the thread until the plug spins freely. Be sure to use the anti-seize compound when doing this.

Be sure that both threads are clean and free of grit when installing plugs. Be careful that the anti-seize compound doesn't acquire dust or grit. One little particle of sand can start the whole process of thread destruction.

Don't over tighten plugs. As long as they are tight enough to resist vibration which would cause them to loosen and spin... they're tight enough. Best to follow recommended torque specs.


Never clean plugs with a revolving wire wheel. It will deform the steel threads on the plug so that they deform the aluminum threads in the head.
 

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Use a spark plug back tap tool similar to: https://www.jegs.com/p/JEGS/JEGS-Back-Tap-Spark-Plug-Thread-Repair/954483/10002/-1
Additionally there are how to videos on "You Tube" on proper use of the tool. Do not use a thread chaser.
Additionally don't care for my Harbor Fright Torque Wrench as I don't know the accuracy of the calibration. My personal preference are the directions on the spark plug box...believe it to be 1/4 turn after finger tight....could be 1/2 turn. Don't recall offhand.
 
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