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2018 T120 & 2000 Ducati Monster 900
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That is a very nice collection of rides. I remember a very beautiful black and silver K1100RS BMW sold around 1996. I rode one of then newly released K1200RS in 1997 while on a Edelweiss tour. I always thought the FJ series was underated but I never got around of trying one.

If I went Ducati it would have be one those Mike Hailwood Replicas or a single cyclinder 250 or 350.
Had three of the 250 singles including a scrambler, those are the ones that should have stayed but young and dumb then, now I'm not just not young 馃檭
 

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Discussion Starter #22
# 1 1979 Honda CX500. Well, I rode one around the world in '79/'80 so how could it not be my first choice.
# 2 1977 Suzuki PE250. Although only ever a clubman level rider it made me look like like an expert whenever I rode an enduro.
# 3 2002 Triumph 955 Speed Triple. It was Nuclear Red, gotta be on the list.
# 4 2005 Triumph Speedtona. A speed tripled Daytona 955i. Triumphs best iteration of it's 955/1050 engine series.
Around the world...that puts you in a very rare club.

My buddy Rapid Roy bought a 1983 CX650 Turbo new and still has it we did a video on it. It only has about 2000 miles.

Triumph use to make some pretty spectacular colors didn't they?
 

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Tastes differ so of course it would not be right to fault anyone's choice of bikes nor feel offended if someone does not like your choice. It is important to do a good job of choosing a bike that you will continue to like so you don't have to soon trade for another bad choice.

It's good to own at least two bikes so you have an alternative to ride when you tire of a bike that you will enjoy again after time away from it. That all said, I have owned a minimum quantity of one bike during 54 years; most of the time owned two and presently have three for a grand total of only 11 since 1966.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Tastes differ so of course it would not be right to fault anyone's choice of bikes nor feel offended if someone does not like your choice. It is important to do a good job of choosing a bike that you will continue to like so you don't have to soon trade for another bad choice.

It's good to own at least two bikes so you have an alternative to ride when you tire of a bike that you will enjoy again after time away from it. That all said, I have owned at least one bike continuously over 54 years; most of the time owned two and presently have three for a grand total of only 11 since 1966.
It sounds like you made some better fitting choices than I did at least until fairly recently . Keeping one bike for 54 years reflects well on your ability to choose.
 

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It sounds like you made some better fitting choices than I did at least until fairly recently . Keeping one bike for 54 years reflects well on your ability to choose.
retjustdad53, I apologize for my wording; fixed it. I didn't mean the same bike. I have one bike since 1981, another since 1986; the third since 2017. Choose the right bike and keep it! My present three road bikes are each very much unlike the other two. It is good to have owned at least a small variety of bikes and ridden a few others so there is then no need to think that you might be missing something imagined as better.
 

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2016 Bonneville T120 Black
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Favorite bike is my 2016 T120 Black that is my current ride. Worst bike was my first - Yamaha RT2 360. Kicked like a mule if you didn't get the kickstart right. And dont mention the electrics! Favorite dirtbike was a Sherco 300SEF. Numerous bikes in between all those, road and dirt.
 

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2019 T100
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Favorite bike is my 2016 T120 Black that is my current ride. Worst bike was my first - Yamaha RT2 360. Kicked like a mule if you didn't get the kickstart right. And dont mention the electrics! Favorite dirtbike was a Sherco 300SEF. Numerous bikes in between all those, road and dirt.
I had one of those 360s around '93 or so. They're cool little bikes. I wish I still had it. Their value (along with anything else "vintage" has shot up) Mine was silver and in pristine condition. It would be a blast to run back and forth to work on now
 

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For me I鈥檇 have to choose what鈥檚 in my current garage.
80 Yamaha XT500 (had one new in 1980 and had to get another 38 years later. Absolutely love this bike)
08 Speed Triple
12 Thunderbird Storm
20 Rocket 3R (pick her up today. In love all over again)

Would have to mention other bikes I鈥檝e had which I鈥檝e enjoyed
76? Honda Elsinore125 (my first bike)
77 XL 250
86 TT600 (A pig. Major CDI issues but a grunt machine)
97 Daytona T595
98 Adventurer
02 Speed Triple (great bike)
08 Rocket 3 Classic ( no ground clearance so had to go)
 

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Discussion Starter #30
For me I鈥檇 have to choose what鈥檚 in my current garage.
80 Yamaha XT500 (had one new in 1980 and had to get another 38 years later. Absolutely love this bike)
08 Speed Triple
12 Thunderbird Storm
20 Rocket 3R (pick her up today. In love all over again)

Would have to mention other bikes I鈥檝e had which I鈥檝e enjoyed
76? Honda Elsinore125 (my first bike)
77 XL 250
86 TT600 (A pig. Major CDI issues but a grunt machine)
97 Daytona T595
98 Adventurer
02 Speed Triple (great bike)
08 Rocket 3 Classic ( no ground clearance so had to go)
Very nice variation for current bikes and same could be said about past bikes. You must be pretty cool to ride R3s most riders over here seem to be. Good luck with the new one.
 

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Almost bought a 77 Yamaha triple but went with the GS750 ( only bike I bought new ) .Kept it for over 30years and 65k miles . Have owned 50+ bikes and have special memories that go with each . Not all good times but memorable
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Almost bought a 77 Yamaha triple but went with the GS750 ( only bike I bought new ) .Kept it for over 30years and 65k miles . Have owned 50+ bikes and have special memories that go with each . Not all good times but memorable
You made a better choice on that one.
 

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In 66 years of riding I've owned over 60 motorcycles.
Liked almost all of them. Probably the most uninspiring were the Sears Allstate, and the Montgomery Wards Benelli, oh, and musn't forget the Rockford.

There were many favorites for a variety of reasons, they included a 1925 BSA (used to ride it in parades), Suzuki Wankel, Honda CBX, 76 Honda Gold Wing Limited Edition, Bultaco Metralla, Yamaha RT360 and 250 DT1, Hondamatic 750, CZ 250, Greeves Griffon, Honda Superhawk, Yamaha Warrior 1700, and Honda 305 Dream.

My current favorite is my 2006 Triumph Bonneville T100. Except for their similar great looks, there's no comparison between my T100 and my early 60's Bonneville which I had in the 60's; the 650 Bonnie could be hard to kickstart, leaked oil, sometimes it shed parts like a stripper, and it could vibrate your teeth out.

As we all appreciate, it's inspiring to know Triumph has come a long ways in improving the reliability and functionality of their bikes while maintaining (and perhaps even improving) on one of the most classic looks in motorcycling with the current editions of the Bonneville.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
In 66 years of riding I've owned over 60 motorcycles.
Liked almost all of them. Probably the most uninspiring were the Sears Allstate, and the Montgomery Wards Benelli, oh, and musn't forget the Rockford.

There were many favorites for a variety of reasons, they included a 1925 BSA (used to ride it in parades), Suzuki Wankel, Honda CBX, 76 Honda Gold Wing Limited Edition, Bultaco Metralla, Yamaha RT360 and 250 DT1, Hondamatic 750, CZ 250, Greeves Griffon, Honda Superhawk, Yamaha Warrior 1700, and Honda 305 Dream.

My current favorite is my 2006 Triumph Bonneville T100. Except for their similar great looks, there's no comparison between my T100 and my early 60's Bonneville which I had in the 60's; the 650 Bonnie could be hard to kickstart, leaked oil, sometimes it shed parts like a stripper, and it could vibrate your teeth out.

As we all appreciate, it's inspiring to know Triumph has come a long ways in improving the reliability and functionality of their bikes while maintaining (and perhaps even improving) on one of the most classic looks in motorcycling with the current editions of the Bonneville.
I rode what I remember was an Allstate when I was young. As I remember it was a funky 2 stroke with siamese cylinders.

The T100 is probably the cleanest and stylish Triumph around along with being easiet to ride.
 

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Yep rejustdad53 ;
Your recall is very good about the Allstate and its siamese two stroke twin cylinder way back when.
The apropos name back then was the moniker, Twingle.
According to Wikipedia they describe twingles as follows :

The advantage of the split-single engine compared to a conventional two-stroke engine is that the split-single can give better exhaust scavenging while minimising the loss of unburnt fresh fuel/air charge through the exhaust port. As a consequence, a split-single engine can deliver better economy, and may run better at small throttle openings. A disadvantage of the split-single is that, for only a marginal improvement over a single-cylinder engine, a split-single engine is larger, heavier and more expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Yep rejustdad53 ;
Your recall is very good about the Allstate and its siamese two stroke twin cylinder way back when.
The apropos name back then was the moniker, Twingle.
According to Wikipedia they describe twingles as follows :

The advantage of the split-single engine compared to a conventional two-stroke engine is that the split-single can give better exhaust scavenging while minimising the loss of unburnt fresh fuel/air charge through the exhaust port. As a consequence, a split-single engine can deliver better economy, and may run better at small throttle openings. A disadvantage of the split-single is that, for only a marginal improvement over a single-cylinder engine, a split-single engine is larger, heavier and more expensive.
Did Wikipedia mention how the dang thing would seize馃槃馃槃馃槃
 

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This is mine from number one the Norton I have owned since new and built it my way back in the early 80s View attachment 747597 View attachment 747598 View attachment 747599 View attachment 747600 View attachment 747601 h
I have owned and build a few other great bikes but these are my favorite ones, the Norton will always be my number one owned since new and I converted it to the Featherbed frame back in the early 80s by my own hands, its my hot rod bike, the 81 Triumph Thunderbird was also one of my favorites was brought new and clocked up a lot of trouble free miles on it and one of the biggest mistakes I ever made selling it, all the other bikes I still own and all brought new.
If I had the money and the space I would have kept most of the bikes I have owned in the 48 years of riding, but there comes time when you do have to let go of somethings in our lives.

Ashley
 

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Discussion Starter #40
I have owned and build a few other great bikes but these are my favorite ones, the Norton will always be my number one owned since new and I converted it to the Featherbed frame back in the early 80s by my own hands, its my hot rod bike, the 81 Triumph Thunderbird was also one of my favorites was brought new and clocked up a lot of trouble free miles on it and one of the biggest mistakes I ever made selling it, all the other bikes I still own and all brought new.
If I had the money and the space I would have kept most of the bikes I have owned in the 48 years of riding, but there comes time when you do have to let go of somethings in our lives.

Ashley
Yes sir. I have sold a few on mine over the years to go to Bonneville.
 
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