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As posted by others, "scrambler" in the UK used to mean motocross bike, probably not registered for the road, perhaps using Castrol R. Modern day road-legal scramblers are better described as "bloated trail bikes" . There was a time when trail bikes made excellent commuter bikes in London, potholes not a problem, handlebars higher than the mirrors on most cars.

With a bit of modification, modern bloated trail bikes can make good progress on a trail

 

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Discussion Starter #123
I think there is a distinct difference between riding off road in the UK, it is mainly mud over here, than in the drier climates.
 

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As posted by others, "scrambler" in the UK used to mean motocross bike, probably not registered for the road, perhaps using Castrol R. Modern day road-legal scramblers are better described as "bloated trail bikes" . There was a time when trail bikes made excellent commuter bikes in London, potholes not a problem, handlebars higher than the mirrors on most cars.

With a bit of modification, modern bloated trail bikes can make good progress on a trail

Those bikes on that clip are nothing more then bikes ridding on gravel roads, I guess I have a different definition of off roading, hell here in Iowa half the roads are gravel, I never knew that when I went out to see my girlfriend that lived in the country that I was "off roading"
 

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Where to you find gravel roads like those in the video. They looked almost groomed and have no wear lines from car tracks. I am used to gravel roads that have bare sections where the cars tires travel and loose gravel between them.
 

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Where to you find gravel roads like those in the video. They looked almost groomed and have no wear lines from car tracks. I am used to gravel roads that have bare sections where the cars tires travel and loose gravel between them.
Yea most gravel roads are as you describe but right after a maintainer has groomed the road they are similar to the clip that was posted, still gravel roads though, nothing off roading about em, just less traveled is all.
 

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Yea most gravel roads are as you describe but right after a maintainer has groomed the road they are similar to the clip that was posted, still gravel roads though, nothing off roading about em, just less traveled is all.
I'd like to have seen how he would have rode if they had not just been maintained.
 

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Discussion Starter #129
Well not all of the U.S. is a desert. I use to regularly run my honda 250 Elsinore through lots of mud, here on the east coast.
No sorry, I wasn't trying to say that America is a baron desert or anything, I meant that other than tarmac roads the UK is mainly a muddy bog.
 

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Those bikes on that clip are nothing more then bikes ridding on gravel roads, I guess I have a different definition of off roading, hell here in Iowa half the roads are gravel, I never knew that when I went out to see my girlfriend that lived in the country that I was "off roading"
In the UK, a trail could be an unmetalled or unpaved road, it could be a track, it could be both. Different people probably have different definitions for "offroad".
 

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The scrambler thing is just a nostalgic tip-of-the-hat to how off-roading started. That's all. There are obviously better technical solutions to every possible niche of off-roading imaginable now. Then, the pipes got raised for clearance and a sprocket might have gotten changed for the task. I remember obsessing about the dessert races out west when Triumph, Bultaco, other Euro brands, and early Japanese bikes were all in it. They were the best...then.

But this feeling is what Triumph is after as far as the scrambler is concerned.

 

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I guess you could say they are the two wheeled version of a 4 wheel drive car. The vast majority will never go off tarmac so its more of a style thing IMO..
 

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There was a time in the 1970s / 1980s when a Range Rover was a useful utility vehicle in London: excellent visibility over cars / small vans, potholes/kerbs not a problem, surprisingly nippy. 15 miles per Imperial gallon was a bit of a downside though.

The original Range Rover looks positively restrained compared to modern utility vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter #140
There was a time in the 1970s / 1980s when a Range Rover was a useful utility vehicle in London: excellent visibility over cars / small vans, potholes/kerbs not a problem, surprisingly nippy. 15 miles per Imperial gallon was a bit of a downside though.
Yes but so was a Transit van and being in London the van would have also been a lot more use.
The original Range Rover looks positively restrained compared to modern utility vehicles.
Have you seen the new 'Defender'
718147


Personally I think Land Rover has completely missed the mark on this one, is this not just another 'Discovery' or 'Range Rover' clone? I can't see how your average hill farmer in Wales could make any use out of this at all. I've owned a couple of series 3's in my time when I used to do off roading as a hobby, they could be fixed with very basic tools and you didn't really mind if they got beaten up a bit.
 
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