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cheerfulljerry, you are correct a Scrambler is a modified Bonneville. That's how it started its life and style. So when you buy one you are also buying into that era of motorcycles
 

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Discussion Starter #107
cheerfulljerry, you are correct a Scrambler is a modified Bonneville. That's how it started its life and style. So when you buy one you are also buying into that era of motorcycles
I'm honestly not trying to come across as an arsehole trying to take the piss or anything, but Triumphs Scrambler as they are now just look too big and heavy for the job, Steve Ford posted this earlier on in the thread

717705


which I get completely, it looks to be specifically design to be a 'Scrambler' it also looks to be smaller and lighter than the new bikes so therefore more competent off road.

I really think I'm going to have to try and get hold of one for a test ride so I can get a proper feel of new Scrambler for myself.
 

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I think the original Bonnies were almost 100lbs lighter than the modern versions. Same goes for vintage HD vs new, Indians, BMW, etc. Check out Honda's CL vintage line or the Elsinores.
 

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I really think I'm going to have to try and get hold of one for a test ride so I can get a proper feel of new Scrambler for myself.
Oh please do. Those of us with Scramblers would benefit enormously from your insight to help us understand why we ride them, and knowing we have your approval will be amazing. I’ve always thought I was enjoying riding mine but clearly I’m not using it for the correct “job”. Thanks in advance!
 

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Discussion Starter #110
Oh please do. Those of us with Scramblers would benefit enormously from your insight to help us understand why we ride them, and knowing we have your approval will be amazing. I’ve always thought I was enjoying riding mine but clearly I’m not using it for the correct “job”. Thanks in advance!
Wit is not your strong point is it Grandad? You obviously didn't get the memo. The title of this discussion say's 'I don't get Scramblers' not 'YOU don't scramblers', the emphasis being on the letter 'I' at the start of the sentence, but it is obviously beyond your intelligence to read it properly. I'm trying to gain an insight into such machines but as always all you want to do is be offensive
 

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I think the original Bonnies were almost 100lbs lighter than the modern versions. Same goes for vintage HD vs new, Indians, BMW, etc. Check out Honda's CL vintage line or the Elsinores.
You naught want to rethink that. BMW’s flagship sport touring bike in 1977 was all of one pound lighter than the 2020 R1200RS. The Harley Sportster was also only 32 pounds lighter in 1977 vs today.
 

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I should not have implied the 100 lbs difference for all those marques. I can tell you that the '42 Indian Chief that I sat on once seemed to be half the size of a current Indian Chief. My Daytona dwarfed it in height. Look at what the original GL1000 was vs today's Gull Wing. Only seems that current sport bikes have dropped their tonnage from years ago. Roll a Meriden Bonnie next to today's version and the size difference is quite noticeable. To me anyway. Not to mention how better the vintage bike looks.
 

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Discussion Starter #114
I should not have implied the 100 lbs difference for all those marques. I can tell you that the '42 Indian Chief that I sat on once seemed to be half the size of a current Indian Chief. My Daytona dwarfed it in height. Look at what the original GL1000 was vs today's Gull Wing. Only seems that current sport bikes have dropped their tonnage from years ago. Roll a Meriden Bonnie next to today's version and the size difference is quite noticeable. To me anyway. Not to mention how better the vintage bike looks.
Most bikes as well as cars have got 'fatter' over the years. Just because they get bigger in size doesn't necessarily mean they get heavier due to the use of modern materials, more plastic's and less steel. but this also gives them a cheaper look, I'm not digging at Triumph here but all manufacturers including car manufacturers do the same. I feel the same as you, stick a new Bonneville next to an old one and there is a significant size difference, which is the point I'm trying to make and the question I have been asking. I used to do a bit off on/off roading back in the late 80's early 90's on an XT500 which was great fun, but I'm not sure if I would want such an 'extreme' bike now because of the amount of road miles I need one for. So perhaps someone out there might be able to give me some good information without getting cocky about it and putting me off Scramblers all together.
 

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Discussion Starter #117
I think though if I were to get a Scrambler it would have to be a Ducati Desert Sled, far better looking than the Triumph, lighter and more powerful too.
717731
 

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I think though if I were to get a Scrambler it would have to be a Ducati Desert Sled, far better looking than the Triumph, lighter and more powerful too.
View attachment 717731
Here is a revzilla review of the sled, after a 700 mile trip, both on and off road.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #119
Here is a revzilla review of the sled, after a 700 mile trip, both on and off road.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Very insightful thanks Gabriel, I think the 800cc version would be the one to go for though. Looks to be much more 'flickable' than the larger engine machines. I am definitely looking at getting one, there's one in a dealer a couple of miles from me, I think i'll check it out. (y)
 

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I bought a Street Scrambler for a number of reasons.

One was that when I began riding, bikes like this Norton Ranger/P11 (a Norton Atlas 750 engine in a Matchless 500 scrambler frame)

Norton P11 Ranger (24).JPG


were being sold off cheaply through the likes of Pride & Clarke because the Americans weren't buying them any more, but 16/17 year old me couldn't afford one. :)

At the same time Triumph were making the TR6C Trophy

unnamed.jpg


and I loved the look - small tank, high bars, high pipes.

Even 50 years ago, nobody was scrambling (in the UK, scrambling = motocross) those things. Their only real use in off-road competition was as desert racers in the US. Even as trail bikes they made little sense in the UK - too much mud, but as "street scramblers" they were great.

My Street Scrambler may occasionally be ridden up a dry, stony, Welsh trail, but, really, it just reminds me of those 1960s "street scramblers" that were available from all the British, and Japanese, manufacturers.


As for the 1200 Scramblers, again, the mud must make them pretty useless (unless you're an off-road ace) in the UK, but I'd imagine that they make more sense on dry trails in Australia or the US.
 
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