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Greetings
New to Triumphs. I am about to purchase a 2000 tbird and would like to know how I can verify the bike's history e.g. repairs, maintenance, mileage.
Thanks
 

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ok, i'll put this out there...Receipts? Otherwise, carfax is the only commericially available means of checking that stuff. Pretty sure they are kept the same as cars are. Though that will not give maintenance history. Other option could be the dealer if he kept with the same one though its years. good luck. Plenty of info on here, if there is a repair you're not sure is legit. search for it, you'll likely find it.
 

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Carfax and the like only list accidents which were reported to the insurance company, so it is near useless. I once helped a girl look for a used Toyota, and at one dealer we test drove a beautiful looking Corolla. I immediately noticed a drivebelt whine, which happens when pullies are not on the same plane. Looking over the body carefully, I noticed some overspray near one door, and the left fender had been improperly mounted. Basically, the car had seen front end damage serious enough to misalign two engine pullies and require bodywork and repainting. It had a clean Carfax record and had the Toyota certified used car badge on the window. When I asked how the professional mechanic who did the certifictaion inspection could have missed the fact that the car had been in a major accident, the sales manager said, and I quote: "Well, obviously that car is not the one for you." - never been back to that dealer!
Option 1: Forget all of the paperwork, and take the bike to an older experienced mechanic and pay him his time to do a thorough pre-purchase inspection. Accident damage is usually obvious on a bike, and these models are old school in design and should be an easy job for an experienced mechanic to inspect.
Option 2: You don't list your location, but if you are close to one of us, you could probably have someone ride over to look it over for you. Honestly, the mechanic is the better option, unless you plan on doing your own work, as you could begin to establish a good working relationship from the very start.
 
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