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Discussion Starter #1
Ok so a couple years i had new tires put on t 140 with new tubes.

Fast forward couple days ago parked the bike the tire just goes flat the rim lock pinched the tube ordered a new tube changed it out but the rim locks are giving me fits one was shifted off to on side I tried to fix it and pinched the brand new tube. Damn it all.

So what are the tricks to get the tube in the tire get the locks installed and not pinch the tube ?

I'm using tire spoons and a 5 gallon bucket. what do guys use as tire lube ?
 

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I took the rim locks out 20 odd years ago and never had a tyre creep on the rim.Just blank off the hole in the rim with a bolt.Make sure the bolt head is very flat,or grind it down to be flat.The correct tyre lube is obviously the best to use,however,i use a silicone lubricant spray and the tyres still never creep on the rim.Just keep the pressure up where they should be.
 

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Pull the rim locks up as close to the rim as possible then insert the partially inflated tube; when you're installing the final tire bead, make sure to push the rim lock down into the tube when the tire bead is at it, so to speak, so that the tire bead seats properly. It's a pain to do this job (I once spent 8 hours on one), but by taking your time and using the proper tire irons, you should be o.k. For a lube, I used hand soap, but some say that will cause rusting on the rim; there are specific lubes out there for the job.


Not a lot of fun, for sure: Jim
 

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It also helps to heat the tire so it's more flexible. I bought some long spoons at Harbor Freight and I use something similar to Armor All as a lube. Even after all that it still wasn't any fun. I ended up leaving the locks out and taping over the holes from inside.
 

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[ame]http://www.amazon.com/1-7-Formula-Tire-Mounting-Lube/dp/B007GFML72[/ame]

I used this lube on the last tire changes, radials.
Went right on.
 

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Hi,

a couple years i had new tires put on t 140 with new tubes.
couple days ago
the rim lock pinched the tube
With respect, if a rim lock really pinched the tube after two years, the rim lock cannot be the problem, something else is wrong and you're missing it blaming the rim lock.

Fitting a tyre and tube on a rim with locks is easy:-

. Put the lock between the rim and the rim tape (you did check new tapes were fitted with the new tyres and tubes?). Saves weakening the tape with holes for the lock threads and the tape holds the locks in place. :thumb

. Screw each lock nut just on to the end of the lock thread.

. Fit the tyre on one side of the rim. As the "spoons" (or the fitting machine) get close to a lock, simply push on the end of the thread to move the lock into the tyre - the tape'll hold the lock in position in one direction, the nut on the thread will stop the lock dropping into the tyre. :thumb

. Fit the tube. The tape is holding the locks against the rim so they can't pinch the tube (you are putting a little air into the tube to give it shape?).

. Fit the tyre on the other side of the rim. Again, as the spoons or the fitting machine get close to a lock, simply push on the end of the thread to move the lock into the tyre - the tape and the tube'll hold the lock in position.

. Seat the tyre in the rim, set the correct pressure, fit the rim lock washers and tighten the nuts.

Job done. :doublethumb

what do guys use as tire lube ?
Whatever the tyre fitter uses.

I took the rim locks out 20 odd years ago and never had a tyre creep on the rim.
Just keep the pressure up where they should be.
How do you do that when you have a puncture? ;)

Cure: Remove Locks. Place trash can about five feet away.
This is a good cure if you never have a puncture on the move afterwards. Otoh, if you have a puncture on the move, my personal, first-hand experience is having one in a wheel with rim locks is infinitely-less underwear-staining than having one in a wheel without rim locks.

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Yesterday I was out on my lardy but not so tardy T160. The old slug started wallowing around through turns. And yep, nail punctured rear.

No rim locks & 2 km from home. Ahhhhh decisions, decisions. I thought screw this so I took it real easy and rode home, no way was I ringing you know who :wink2:for a ute pickup. Tends to squark off a bit if that happens. :smile2:

Tyre stayed on the rim but I still think they are a good safety investment in case of a high speed blowout. I did have a front blowout about 6 years ago on my old Busa, was very lucky to get away with it, on a bend with a semi big rig coming the other way, still don't know how I pulled that one off :headscratch
 

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2XS: I'm using tire spoons and a 5 gallon bucket. what do guys use as tire lube ?
Hello 2XS,
For tire lube, I used baby powder! Less of a mess. I rubbed it all over the tube and the inside of the tire before sticking the tube in the tire. Then put air in the tube temporarily to straiten the tube out so it didn't have any kinks. I watched a couple video's on YouTube before attempting to mount the tire and found it really helpful. Again, all I used was the talcum powder and it work great.....Gary
 

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Always good if you have a helper and about 5 levers.I get the tyre on fairly easy that way without the security bolts.I have only had 2 rear tyre punctures since 1969 so not too worried about a future puncture.I only use roads so not likely to pick up prickles.
Normally,a rear tyre puncture will go down at a controlled pace if it is a tubed tyre and you might get a chance to slow down in control.Most important is how old the tyres and tubes are, and to replace the tube at every tyre change .Of course,there is a product that can be squirted into the tube to mend a puncture as it happens.I have this in a bicycle and it has worked fairly well in allowing a very slow let down.
 

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Of course,there is a product that can be squirted into the tube to mend a puncture as it happens.I have this in a bicycle and it has worked fairly well in allowing a very slow let down.
I've never used 'Slime / Goop / call it what you will' in motorcycle tyres. I was a little worried about how the stuff sloshing about in the tube would affect the wheel balance. I do, however, use it in my off road bicycle tyres. I cover a lot of miles on byways and bridle paths and I can honestly say that I've never had a tyre go flat on me. I've certainly had punctures... when I've changed tyres and tubes there has been plenty of evidence and thorn and flint damage but the hole has always been sealed by the 'stuff' before much air has leaked away.
 

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Chucked my tyre locks away years ago , never had any trouble at all with tyre creep , you don't see em used on modern bikes that have loads more power .
 

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The gloop apparently works the same as the tyre beads in that it balances the wheel as it rotates?

I didn't fit the rim locks when I fitted stainless rims
 

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For tire lube, I used baby powder! Gary
I looked high and low to locate some powder without fragrance, not knowing if the chemicals had an effect on the tube materials. All the baby powders I found had it.

I ended up having to spend quite a bit for "tire talc" but the container will last my lifetime.

I think the tube needs that lubrication but I'm not confident that having a non-evaporating lube on the bead is a good idea.
 

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BION, the use of talc in tire tube boxes or SCUBA diver wet suits it to keep the folded rubber from melting or cementing together. Nothing useful in applying it to a tire tube in a rim. Lots of bicycle tires to show for the effort.

(A quart of used Mobil 1 (imperial or US) to first to define SCUBA.)
 

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Notes for a Saturday morning.
On a street bike rim locks are not to keep the tire from moving on the rim. They were used before rims were designed to hold the tire in place when the tire rapidly deflates. I can speak from experience. You want the tire on the rim when you have such an experience! Of course you pay your nickel and take your chances!

If you need tire irons to mount a vintage tire longer than 6-7" you are doing something wrong. In fact the guys doing the Six Day Trials learn to change tubes without tire irons. That is WITH rim locks and stiff dirt tires.

When offering the bead from the first side to be mounted you locate the part of the rim between the tire stem and one of the rim locks. With the bead lubricated with your committees favorite tire lubricant push the edge of the bead over the edge of the rim and as up close to the rim strap as you can get it. Your problem is the inner diameter of the tire bead is going to be inches smaller than the diameter of the rim. The only way you can get the tire bead over the rim is by moving the far edge of the bead away from the rim. You did this when you first offered the bead and pushed in up against the center of the rim strap. Then you should be able to put all but 6" of the bead over the the rim by hand. Take up the last 6", or so, with a small tire iron (our your hand).

Wet the iron with rubber lube. Slide the tire iron between the last 6" of the bead and the rim. Then slide the tire iron sideways as far to one side of the unmounted bead as you can. Then lever a little bit of unmounted bead at a time. If you lube the bead well you should be able to push the last 4" or so over the edge of the rim with the base of the palm of your hand. Do the same to the second bead starting at the same point between the valve stem and one of the rim locks.

I prefer to put one side of the tire on the rim before offering the rim locks. Then offer the locks, then the tube and when all of this is in place mount the second side.

While in my younger days I did all this on the floor (or the turf when woods riding), today I prefer using a round steel trash can (don't know what you call them in the UK. This raises the tire and is a bit easier on the back. The one i use has a rubber tube around the top edge to protect the spokes.

The tire should be inflated to seat the bead, but never to more than the maximum figure printed on the side of the tire. Then the tire should be deflated by removing the valve in the tube stem. Then inflate to the pressure recommended by your committee, board of directors, or manual if you think it is correct. NEVER fail to use a valve stem cap especially if it is one of the dice varities :)

Good points already mentioned:

Points already made:
The tube should be partially inflated. Just enough so that it will bend over and form a "V" when supported at diametrically opposites points.

The tube should be coated with any form of talc... smelly or not.

When offered, the rim lock and tube stem should have the nuts threaded on a couple of threads until the tire beads are seated and tube is ready to be inflated for the last time.

Although there is a lot of people who like putting the rim strap over the rim locks, I am a bit old school about this and like the option of moving them out of the way easily. I use the ball end of a ball peen hammer, and another hammer to strike the blow, to cut the holes in the strap for the rim locks. Place the strap on the rim. Locate the rim lock hole in the rim. Place the ball portion of the hammer head over the rim lock hole with the rim strap in between. Strike the small hammer which will cut a nice round hole.

The guys on my tire lube committee prefer using P-80, but its what ever you have available.

If you are struggling with a vintage type Dunlop, Avon, Michelin, etc. tire stop, take a break and go over in the head what needs to be done. You are trying to move one edge of a smaller circle over a larger circle. It just happens the larger circle has a drop center which will allow you to move one edge of the smaller circle away from the opposite edge of the larger circle. When you get all things in line, just like those Six Day riders you will be mounting tires with your hands, or using a couple turns with a very short tire iron.
 
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