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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you properly break in a new scrambler. I never had a new bike before, always bought used bikes. I have heard different opinions, but I would like to hear from triumph riders. Any advice will be appreciated.
 

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Just take it easy for 500 miles, especially don't lug the motor at low revs in a high gear, keep it spinning. Give it bursts of power through the gears as you get towards 1000 miles, helps knock off any rough edges. You have to give it work to do, but avoid constant high speed running till after 1000 miles.
 

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On 2007-02-19 16:37, Jimbonnie wrote:
There's a different school of thought that says break them in hard to seat the piston rings as soon as possible. Here's a link to one site:

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
When the dude at mototune offers as good a warranty as Triumph, I'll start braking in street engines that way...
 
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Yeah, do like the manual states. Just be certain to vary the rpm's and load on the engine. Do not go to extremes with rpm's above 4k, or lug the bike. Be sure and use 'reverse' pressure on the rings by using the engine to slow you down....especially on downhill runs. Going up and down hills at moderate throttle and rpm should do you fine.
 

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ahhrgh - don't lug it early, don't wanna load up the bearings, but give it some***** after 500kms, as you don't want to baby it too much - run them in fast, you wind up with a fast bike, you can ruin them by dollying them too much. They're tough, hard, over-engineered motors, make them work early on. Follow your instincts and feelings as you run the beast, bond her to you .. cheers Pat
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all, for your inputs. I'm picking up the bike today from the dealer. This is my first Triumph motorcycle. I hope it be reliable.
 

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"When the dude at mototune offers as good a warranty as Triumph, I'll start braking in street engines that way..."

That dude would probably respond that Triumph, and every other manufacturers break in techniques, are designed more to protect the manufacturers from defects in materials and workmanship than to ensure you have an optimum running motor.

After reading motomans articles, and many others, I came to the conclusion that there was some truth in what he espoused. Since that time I’ve used his approach to the half dozen or so BMW engines I’ve rebuilt and in my experience those motors run significantly stronger, have lower oil consumption, are cleaner internally, and are at least as reliable as motors I’d rebuilt earlier and broken in using the manufacturers recommendations.

I guess the bottom line is that the worst thing you can do to your motor is to lug it; beyond that I doubt there is much you can do, within reason, to hurt it, and unless someone at Triumph screwed up, you should have an extremely reliable motor.
 

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First,
you gotta realize that you're getting nothing more than a collection of opinions from a bunch of strangers. That outa the way, here's another opinion from yet another stranger:

Put picking up your Scrambler off for one more day, or better still.... trailer it home. The whole idea is NOT to ride it without first doing a couple things.
1) You may or may not want to remove the AIS. I recycles HOT air & unburned gases into you headers..... which in turn contributes to some REALLY hot, REALLY blued, and sometimes REALLY burned looking pipes. If you're not inclined to be REALLY clean & green, remove the AIS and reduce some of the burning heat that discolors your headers. The dealer may not want to do this for you as it could be a legal issue.
2) Regardless of whether you choose to remove the AIS, you CAN take steps to reduce the likelihood of an ugly mottled finish to your headers. Clean your headers real well, then take some mineral spirits and wipe 'em down. You are trying to remove any body oils, finger prints, hand prints, grease, oil, etc. from off your pipes. I read once to let it sit over night with it's cleaned headers, presumably to let the solvent/mineral spirits/alcohol evaporate completely. Fingerprints, oil, 'stuff' will etch/burn into the pipes on the first ride, unless you take steps to reduce the stains. Same thing for the first few rides, avoid riding through water, clean them of road grime and particulate, and polish & wax them often in their infancy.
3) You CAN consider taking your headers off the bike and having them ceramic coated on the inside IF it hasn't been ridden. Or you can save some money and buy some -Kreem- and line your headers with this blue cement in the comfort of your own home, using your oven to set it. It works!

Okay, so much for yer pipes......
Breaking/"running" your new engine in.

For the first 300 miles:
Don't accelerate hard, vary your speed, shift often, ride through town, ride on the freeway but don't hold a steady speed, don't lug the engine, don't spin her up past 4,000 rpm, go easy on your brake pads, don't sit at lights for extended periods, don't ride for any less than a half hour at a time, don't ride any longer than a half hour at a time, don't get back on the bike and fire it up any sooner than a half hour......

Then change your oil (don't even bother with the filter yet unless you really wanna). Lubricate your chain with PJ1 Black, the "BEST" and the messiest..... or PJ1 Blue, or Bel Ray Clean Chain 'wax', or WD40, or motor oil, or........
This is the ONLY bike I've ever had that prefers ONE kind of oil over ALL others that I've tried.... ready for this? It shifts smoother and doesn't clunk, and runs quieter with the expensive Triumph sold Mobil 1 'T'......
300 miles to 600 miles:
Pretty much the same as above, but I like to tease it with a little more throttle, a little more top end, and harder acceleration with more aggressive shifts.

Take it to the dealer for it's 600 miler
- or -
Check that your headers are tightened at the heads, check for the chain having stretched and in need of cleaning/lube, walk around the bike with sockets, allens, screw drivers and tighten stuff. Check those danm bolts that hold your seat to the bike!!! Inspect for leaks, DON'T soak/wash your bike with water but only four times a year, and wax it often. Keep all of your receipts!

600 to 1000 miles:
Start to beat it up a little, progressively more as you near the thousand mile mark. Become familiar with the brakes, top it out somewhere, accelerate hard through the gears. It's at this point that I apply the age old, "break it in like you plan to ride it"...... I'm sorry, but I'm NOT gonna beat the sh!t outa my engine ('cause that's how I ride my bikes) before I've got about 750 miles on the bike.

Change your oil & filter at 1,000 miles, ride it like you stole it!
 

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excellent rundown Pat!!! Wish I'd realised about the headers when I got Scramblor...after taking the trouble to make sure she was NOT started till the AI was removed, I stroked the headers before riding out the showroom... my fingerprints are now indelibly burnt in there, but that's Ok I guess.
Might mention one small complication: unless one has the tacho fitted first up one can't really tell what revs the new bike's doing, have to go by the feel and sound. However, it's a good way to get very empathetic with your motor. I gave mine its first quick squirt to the ton at 650kms. Now at 5000 she pulls like a schoolboy... So far so good.
 

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hmm...must be an untranslatable Antipodean expression... sorry... Suffice it to say, the motor is running strongly -cheers, Pat
 

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It can't be an untranslatable Antipodean expression. Cos I understood it ahh hang I am an Antipodean too :-D
 

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You probably don't want to hear this but; drive it like you stole it for 100-200 miles and change the oil, you'll be broken in.

I know there's allot of controversy over that method; but if you wasn't looking for an alternative method in the first place you wouldn't have asked right? :-D

Greg
 

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By the way,
I could subscribe to Motoman's (and possibly 'bonnieblackinfl') break-in procedure.......
BUT your Dyno man (it has to be done on a Dyno) must have a Dyno print out of a Bonnie already broken in, AND Motoman's instructions must be followed. His is a variation of 'ride it like you stole it' right off the showroom floor..... but under controlled and monitored conditions.

In addition, my having posted how to break a motorcycle engine in may not exactly be the ritual I follow..... I just don't wanna go on record posting what I have made a practice of for years on my various bikes..... and they always seem to be a bit faster than others exactly like them. THAT'S why I can put stock in what the Motoman advises.

In addition, given the modern machinery used to manufacture and assemble today's modern engines made of modern material, I'm thinking a "correct" break-in is no longer as important as it use to be.

[ This message was edited by: FattRat on 2007-02-21 08:39 ]
 

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True, I know there are differences in everyones opinion.

I found out in 2001, with the introduction of the NEW Chrysler PT Cruiser, I bought one and babied it the first 1000 miles like the book said. It burnt oil from day one, 1 quart in 3000 miles, up to 25000 miles, until the rings finally seated.

Another person had bought one, on a PT forum I used to frequent, and drove it like he stole it from day one and had NO problems with burning oil.

From that day on, I've changed my ways of break-in procedures. Coincidence, perhaps, but I have not had any problems with any vehicle burning oil since.

Greg
 
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